Peace protestor Brian Haw is pictured at his peace camp in Parliament Square on February 2, 2005 in London, England.  Mr. Haw began his vigil in June of 2001.

In April of 2005, the Labour Government passed the Serious Organised Crime and Police Act of 2005, several provisions of which were designed to eject Mr. Haw from Parliament Square, as well as to severely limit all demonstrations within a 1-kilometer Exclusion Zone around Parliament Square.  Due to a drafting error, however, the law was initially found not to apply to Mr. Haw, which until an appeals court reversal in May of 2006 made him the only person in Great Britain eligible to demonstrate within the Exclusion Zone without prior police permission.  

After Mr. Haw lost his May 2006 appeal, police dismantled and confiscated much of his large antiwar display, which included works by the famous graffiti artists Banksy.  In January of 2007, former Turner Prize nominee Mark Wallinger unveiled a meticulously crafted recreation of the display in the Tate Britain art gallery, which is within a kilometer of Parliament Square but which falls outside of the Exclusion Zone.  In February of 2007, members of the British public voted Mr. Haw the “Most Inspiring Political Figure” in the Channel 4 News Political Awards. (image by Geoffrey King)
Peace protestor Brian Haw is pictured at his peace camp in Parliament Square on February 2, 2005 in London, England. Mr. Haw began his vigil in June of 2001. In April of 2005, the Labour Government passed the Serious Organised Crime and Police Act of 2005, several provisions of which were designed to eject Mr. Haw from Parliament Square, as well as to severely limit all demonstrations within a 1-kilometer Exclusion Zone around Parliament Square. Due to a drafting error, however, the law was initially found not to apply to Mr. Haw, which until an appeals court reversal in May of 2006 made him the only person in Great Britain eligible to demonstrate within the Exclusion Zone without prior police permission. After Mr. Haw lost his May 2006 appeal, police dismantled and confiscated much of his large antiwar display, which included works by the famous graffiti artists Banksy. In January of 2007, former Turner Prize nominee Mark Wallinger unveiled a meticulously crafted recreation of the display in the Tate Britain art gallery, which is within a kilometer of Parliament Square but which falls outside of the Exclusion Zone. In February of 2007, members of the British public voted Mr. Haw the “Most Inspiring Political Figure” in the Channel 4 News Political Awards.
©Geoffrey King
lightstalkers.org/geoffking | View all images in this gallery | Play slideshow | Feed-icon-10x10-dim Subscribe via RSS
http://www.geoffreykingphotography.com
Icon-previous Icon-next