Members of the ancient Samaritan community pray during the pilgrimage for the holiday of the Tabernacles or Sukkot at the religion's holiest site on Mount Gerizim near the West Bank town of Nablus, early Monday, Oct. 13, 2008. Named for Samaria, a region in the northern West Bank, the Samaritans believe themselves to be the remnants of Israelites exiled by the Assyrians in 722 B.C. They practice a religion closely linked to Judaism and venerate a version of the Old Testament, but are not Jews (image by Kobi Wolf)
Members of the ancient Samaritan community pray during the pilgrimage for the holiday of the Tabernacles or Sukkot at the religion's holiest site on Mount Gerizim near the West Bank town of Nablus, early Monday, Oct. 13, 2008. Named for Samaria, a region in the northern West Bank, the Samaritans believe themselves to be the remnants of Israelites exiled by the Assyrians in 722 B.C. They practice a religion closely linked to Judaism and venerate a version of the Old Testament, but are not Jews
┬ęKobi Wolf
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