Indelible, irreversible and imposed during childhood, Scarification is a cultural practice common in many countries in Africa. The ceremony which is to cut the skin with a knife seems to have crossed times without ever losing its importance. In the 21st century, scarify still is an act of bravery, a way to state an identity, a proof of his pride in belonging to a family or a social status, a way of beautify,  and to avert bad luck .

The project "Scarification" took place in Benin from 2005 to 2008. During those 3 years, the Belgian photographer Jean-Michel Clajot has traveled across the country in search of a face, a body, a history.An exceptional privilege, he was able to attend a ceremony usually reserved for the family. Be immersed in traditional Africa or the beauty and strength in the form of eternal scars.  (image by Jean Michel Clajot)
Indelible, irreversible and imposed during childhood, Scarification is a cultural practice common in many countries in Africa. The ceremony which is to cut the skin with a knife seems to have crossed times without ever losing its importance. In the 21st century, scarify still is an act of bravery, a way to state an identity, a proof of his pride in belonging to a family or a social status, a way of beautify, and to avert bad luck . The project "Scarification" took place in Benin from 2005 to 2008. During those 3 years, the Belgian photographer Jean-Michel Clajot has traveled across the country in search of a face, a body, a history.An exceptional privilege, he was able to attend a ceremony usually reserved for the family. Be immersed in traditional Africa or the beauty and strength in the form of eternal scars.
©Jean Michel Clajot
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