Tenzing ushered me to the common room and brought me a cup of milk tea. The children were giggling and pointing at me. I pointed and giggled back. They burst out laughing. I asked Tenzing about his past. He told me his parents had sent him and his two brothers to India seven years ago to receive a proper Tibetan education and to be close to the Dalai Lama. Tenzing and his brothers, led by mercenary guide, walked across the Himalayas into Nepal, before being transported to McLeod Ganj, a small town near Dharamsala, India which acts as the center for the Tibetan exile community. There, the boys were educated and cared for at the Tibetan Children's Village. That's where Tenzing learnt english, as well as hindi, nepali and some french and german. His two brothers still live abroad, one in Varanasi, and the other in New York City. I asked Tenzing why he came back. He told me his parents were getting old. He wished he was in New York City though. It was dangerous here, the women were no good, and there were hardly any jobs. Tenzing was lucky, he spoke english so he had a good job as a tour guide, but nobody else in the room had one. It was getting late. And I didn't want to find myself locked out of my guesthouse again. I told him we'd talk tomorrow. (image by Ryan Gauvin)
Tenzing ushered me to the common room and brought me a cup of milk tea. The children were giggling and pointing at me. I pointed and giggled back. They burst out laughing. I asked Tenzing about his past. He told me his parents had sent him and his two brothers to India seven years ago to receive a proper Tibetan education and to be close to the Dalai Lama. Tenzing and his brothers, led by mercenary guide, walked across the Himalayas into Nepal, before being transported to McLeod Ganj, a small town near Dharamsala, India which acts as the center for the Tibetan exile community. There, the boys were educated and cared for at the Tibetan Children's Village. That's where Tenzing learnt english, as well as hindi, nepali and some french and german. His two brothers still live abroad, one in Varanasi, and the other in New York City. I asked Tenzing why he came back. He told me his parents were getting old. He wished he was in New York City though. It was dangerous here, the women were no good, and there were hardly any jobs. Tenzing was lucky, he spoke english so he had a good job as a tour guide, but nobody else in the room had one. It was getting late. And I didn't want to find myself locked out of my guesthouse again. I told him we'd talk tomorrow.
©Ryan Gauvin
lightstalkers.org/ryangauvin | View all images in this gallery | Play slideshow | Feed-icon-10x10-dim Subscribe via RSS
www.ryangauvin.com
Icon-previous Icon-next