When I got to his usual spot, Bob's CD stand wasn't set up. He told me he would open in the afternoon. He was dressed up, wearing silk instead of his usual t-shirt and jeans. It was International Human Rights day, and he was going to hang prayer flags near the Dalai Lama's house. He invited me to join him. It was a quiet walk through the woods, with Balou only getting into two or three dog fights along the way. Bob explained to me that he was going to hang four strings of prayer flags: one for his parents, one for his wife and unborn child, one for His Holiness, and one for world peace. Bombing the train, or world peace. I thought about that while Bob and his friend hung the flags and murmured their prayers. It was his Tibetan Buddhist culture, or aggressive politics. It reminded me of Tenzing and his friends in the pool hall in Lhasa. (image by Ryan Gauvin)
When I got to his usual spot, Bob's CD stand wasn't set up. He told me he would open in the afternoon. He was dressed up, wearing silk instead of his usual t-shirt and jeans. It was International Human Rights day, and he was going to hang prayer flags near the Dalai Lama's house. He invited me to join him. It was a quiet walk through the woods, with Balou only getting into two or three dog fights along the way. Bob explained to me that he was going to hang four strings of prayer flags: one for his parents, one for his wife and unborn child, one for His Holiness, and one for world peace. Bombing the train, or world peace. I thought about that while Bob and his friend hung the flags and murmured their prayers. It was his Tibetan Buddhist culture, or aggressive politics. It reminded me of Tenzing and his friends in the pool hall in Lhasa.
©Ryan Gauvin
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