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A Call to all Editor-Members of LS to Contribute Advice

More and more photographers here are asking how to deal with editors and starting threads asking for advice; meanwhile editors are beginning to scan LS for talent. If editors are expected to use LS as a viable resource, then the members have to respond in a professional manner, but they need to know the protocol. We need to review the process whereby editors and photographers interact, and try to improve things a bit, not only here on LS but in general.

With this in mind, would the editors on LS could possibly lend us their time and expertise and define for us what they look for in photographers, what sort of methods they prefer when we approach them? This should save both photographers and editors a lot of time.

So here are some of the major themes or questions that seem to plague people. Feel free to answer any or all of them. Feel free to bring up other themes, or make any complaints about things that really bug you. I will consolidate the material and turn it into a sort of quick how-to guide. Btw, you do not have to identify your magazine or publication, but it would help if you state the category of your publication, whether you are in the newspaper biz, news magazine, travel magazine, etc.

A. What are the best ways to approach an editor, either with a specific story pitch, or a more general appeal for work, using one’s previous work as evidence of the ability to carry out such work?  What is the preferred medium these days to show one’s work — website, pdf files, html pages, hard copy portfolios?

B. What sort of approaches work best? Should photographers research the magazines and make proposals with the magazine’s special interests in mind? Make a very specific approach or just show their general work?

C. Having decided upon a particular means of introducing one’s work to an editor, how should a photographer proceed? If one sends an email or mailer, should one call the editor after a given period to follow up and discuss the matter further? Should one make repeated mailings? Sometimes silence is hard to interpret, and it is certainly frustrating to the photographer after making an effort to present the work,  so what can we do to clarify things a bit without being importunate? Also, some of us live and work outside the usual media centers, so we cannot be there for face-to-face meetings and it is difficult to present hard-copy portfolios — does this pose any problems for the editor?

D. What is it that you look for in a photographer generally? What sort of factors enter into your decision to work with a photographer? Be honest and think broadly: personality factors, professional experience, professional manner, their aesthetics or viewpoint, previous recommendations or an inside contact, the resume or reputation of the photographer (if any), agency representation or the fact that they are independent, whatever enters into the equation.

E. As for contractual matters, how do you prefer to see the photographers handle things like expenses and fees and the like? Are there any things that photographers do that you would want to encourage or discourage?

F. What is your general advice to new photographers without contacts who want to break into the business? What should they be doing to get recognition or to get editors to start paying attention?

by Jon Anderson at 2006-02-16 12:23:43 UTC (ed. Mar 12 2008 ) Santo Domingo , Dominican Republic | Bookmark | | Report spam→

Ah, let me add here, that if you prefer you may simply PM me and offer some comments in that manner in order to protect your identity or the name of the publication.  

Let me stress that this is NOT about the particular workings or inside details of any particular publication, and I do not intend in any way to reproduce any such information in the guidelines I want to prepare.  This is simply a means to develop a set of rules or guidelines that will be of use to photographers who want to contact editors and to editors who hopefully will see that their email inboxes eventually take on saner proportions!!!  We are in this together folks, so let us try to define a way in which we can work together profitably and sanely and not waste each other’s time.

nuff said.

And thanks a bunch to those of you that have already responded privately.   Your efforts are deeply appreciated.


by Jon Anderson | 16 Feb 2006 16:02 | Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic | | Report spam→
A. What are the best ways to approach an editor, either with a specific story pitch, or a more general appeal for work, using one’s previous work as evidence of the ability to carry out such work? What is the preferred medium these days to show one’s work — website, pdf files, html pages, hard copy portfolios?

The best approach is to research, research, research the magazine you’re approaching. The best approach is to know who you’re talking to, some details of the magazine, and have some concrete story ideas. Bob Gilka, former Director of Photography at National Geographic, use to say, “I’m up to my neck in photographers but only up to my ankles in ideas”.


B. What sort of approaches work best? Should photographers research the magazines and make proposals with the magazine’s special interests in mind? Make a very specific approach or just show their general work?

A specific approach plus showing their best work. And please. If you’re talking to an outdoor magazine don’t show a bunch of pictures of suits in offices.



C. Having decided upon a particular means of introducing one’s work to an editor, how should a photographer proceed? If one sends an email or mailer, should one call the editor after a given period to follow up and discuss the matter further? Should one make repeated mailings? Sometimes silence is hard to interpret, and it is certainly frustrating to the photographer after making an effort to present the work, so what can we do to clarify things a bit without being importunate?

Unfortunately, no good answer here. Personally, I hate eMail solicitations. I consider them spam. My preference is for a well-done mailer. Please no suits in offices. Unless it’s a monkey wearing a suit. That’s funny. Humor is sadly lacking these days. We need more of it and there just isn’t much in today’s photography. I like the little books or foldouts of multiple pictures. A well-timed phone call as a follow up to the promo is good. The promo should lead to a website. Please make it easy and fast to navigate. No flash. If your page has to “load” forget it. If your page has a “skip intro” I’ll probably just skip the website. No time. Contact sheet page is preferred. I hate “slide shows”. I don’t want music. A phone number on every page. I want to look at pictures. Contact sheet pages with 15-20 images is great. Remember your portfolio is only as strong as the weakest picture so edit, edit, edit. And get help from somebody you respect on the pictures. A phone number on every page. You may not hear from me. For a while. Chill. I don’t want a bunch of follow-up calls. One is fine. Either I’m going to remember you or not. Oh, and if you’re a professional photojournalist and you’re going to be in my town I’ll almost always see you, talk and look at your stuff. I always have time for a visit.




D. What is it that you look for in a photographer generally? What sort of factors enter into your decision to work with a photographer? Be honest and think broadly: personality factors, professional experience, professional manner, their aesthetics or viewpoint, previous recommendations or an inside contact, the resume or reputation of the photographer (if any), agency representation or the fact that they are independent, whatever enters into the equation.

I work for a magazine that involves photographing children. Most every assignment. I have to be confident in the personality of the photographer. Loose canons, if they somehow get an assignment, don’t get called back. I also don’t appreciate complainers or those who need a lot of hand holding. A confidence that says, ‘I can take the ball and run with this….’ is a real plus. Accurate notes and identification of persons photographed is expected and assumed. This is all assuming you’re a very good photographer.




E. As for contractual matters, how do you prefer to see the photographers handle things like expenses and fees and the like? Are there any things that photographers do that you would want to encourage or discourage?

I pay fairly for all expenses and promptly. I spell out ahead of time what we pay. It’s in a follow-up letter, too. But no contract. No rights grabs. And we pay (probably overpay) for web usage. I’d rather not pay for an assistant unless you can convince me of the need.




F. What is your general advice to new photographers without contacts who want to break into the business? What should they be doing to get recognition or to get editors to start paying attention?

Work on your portfolio. Knock me out with your pictures. Promote yourself in a unique way. I can tell you what promo piece got me to look at a photographer’s work. The AD also wanted to see his website. And the website is a gas, as are the pictures. The photographer ripped a piece of lined notebook paper out of a notebook and scrawled his URL on it. He put in a brown craft envelope and mailed it to me. It was so low tech, cheap and almost crude that it worked. Best promo I’ve gotten. BTW, word-of-mouth is important. That is if you know somebody I know, or can get a reference. There aren’t many degrees of separation in this business. Usually, if I talk to somebody for a few minutes we can come up with mutual acquaintences. This gives an editor confidence in the photographer. So do a lot of networking. For USA photographers go to the PJ seminars. Meet people and try to get people to remember you. And be a good listener. Listen and understand. Oh, and carry your camera with you. How can you sell yourself as a photographer and not be carrying a camera. I am flabbergasted by the number of photographers I see NOT carrying a camera. Do you only photograph “assignments”? Please. Give me a break.

by John Robert Fulton Jr. | 16 Feb 2006 19:02 (ed. Feb 17 2006) | Fort Worth, TX., United States | | Report spam→
This is the best post in LS, since months. Not offense


by [former member] | 16 Feb 2006 23:02 | Santiago, Chile | | Report spam→
Not offense to previouly posts in LS


by [former member] | 16 Feb 2006 23:02 | Santiago, Chile | | Report spam→
I agree! Been waiting for a post like this since I started here.

by Erik Lacson | 16 Feb 2006 23:02 | Manila, Philippines | | Report spam→
John

Great stuff, thanks for taking the time to post, I’m sure all will find the comments useful.


by Nayan Sthankiya | 16 Feb 2006 23:02 | Seoul, Korea (South) | | Report spam→
thanks a lot for the precice information!


by Ruediger Carl Bergmann | 17 Feb 2006 01:02 | Augsburg, Germany | | Report spam→
Thank you!!! To Jon Anderson for posing such direct questions. And to John Robert Fulton Jr. for such direct, detailed replies. They’re much appreciated. Could any other editors spare a few minutes on this? It would be great to know how we can save your time by making submissions that are both appropriate to your publication, your exact needs, and in the best format for you to receive.

by Jenny Lynn Walker | 17 Feb 2006 03:02 (ed. Feb 17 2006) | At Home, United Kingdom | | Report spam→
This post is excellent! It IS a jungle out there and we all need maps and compasses to get to our destination. John, great of you to shed some light! Thanks!!! Do you have any advice on outside USA photographers that may help us? The global village thing is happening but still, some places are still better to be in than others (business wise).

by Willem de Lange | 17 Feb 2006 04:02 | Port Elizabeth, South Africa | | Report spam→
FOlks, be patient, I am collecting many such responses from editors,most of which are coming to me via email and PM, so once the responses reach a critical mass I will work on summarizing them and presenting them to everyone on LS as  a permanent resource.  I have contacted the editors listed on LS individually via PM, so as they begin to pick up their emails, they will learn about this initiative and hopefully respond.  Give them time.  Some have already asked me to wait a week or more.

This is just one article: there is also an article on grant writing, and another on agency representation.  Be patient, I am not a paid employee, just a drone down here in Kiskeya la Bella.


by Jon Anderson | 17 Feb 2006 04:02 | Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic | | Report spam→
A. What are the best ways to approach an editor, either with a specific story pitch, or a more general appeal for work, using one’s previous work as evidence of the ability to carry out such work?  What is the preferred medium these days to show one’s work — website, pdf files, html pages, hard copy portfolios?

On approach this depends very much on a variety of factors – one is the direct approach – email (not so effective as email is often easy to trash as it often comes across as spam-like), call for appt, etc. it’s tough at first depending on the editor and the time they can spend and often this may start with portfolio drop off. However, having said that if there is a way to have someone call on your behalf to an editor (whether your agency, a fellow editor, photographer who is known to the magazine/newspaper etc.) this often bypasses the portfolio dropoff route.  Even those editors who are notorious for drop off only – when they get a call or other referral to see a photographer they often will make room in their schedule.  This speaks to the importance of the relationships that your agency maintains with editors, your networking with your fellow photographers, writers etc. and it is often the way to get your foot in the door for a face to face.  When you have the opportunity for a face to face, remember that the editors’ time is limited so be prepared with your portfolio, promo / leave behind cards and it is best to have a few stories to pitch.  As Jon mentioned research, research, research!!! Don’t go into a magazine and pitch a story without checking on if they not only did it in the past but also if it was awhile back and it is still a subject you’d like to possibly cover with research you should be able to bring a fresh angle to the story/subject.  Even stories which have been done to death all still have possible new angles if you do your research. Also, know what type of stories the magazine / source publish – it’s not a good idea to pitch a story that is too far off base from the type of story a magazine etc. publishes – the magazine editor wants to know that there is a reason why you are coming to them in particular. Of course they understand that you may be shopping the pitch around which is fine but have an understanding of what aspect of the story would work for their magazine. Stories have various angles to them and the same story can be tailored to different magazines depending on which aspect you are highlighting.  Editors appreciate photographers who are active and knowledgeable about the subjects that they are pitching, you don’t need a doctorate on it but they want to know that it is something that you are interested in. If it comes across that your just throwing it out there and not much info/ideas behind your brief pitch they will figure that your fishing and not really into it and won’t have much faith in your executing it.  Also, when an editor gives you a referral or advice on a pitch – follow through!  I’ve met with many photographers over the years who fail to follow up – which dumbfounds me.  Why not followup?  Here is your chance to connect with another editor, writer, or possible publishing of your story and the ball is dropped.  Follow up! This again shows your serious and you and your work will be respected. Also, it keeps you in the editors mind if you don’t followup you fall off the radar in a way.

B.

C. Having decided upon a particular means of introducing one’s work to an editor, how should a photographer proceed? If one sends an email or mailer, should one call the editor after a given period to follow up and discuss the matter further? Should one make repeated mailings? Sometimes silence is hard to interpret, and it is certainly frustrating to the photographer after making an effort to present the work,  so what can we do to clarify things a bit without being importunate?  It is good idea to followup as editors get 30 or more promos a week, often more.  So, sometimes you may not hear from them but if they liked the work they have either filed you in their listings for future reference or dumped it in the trash if it didn’t strike them.  It’s unfortunate but with the number of images that come through not everything sticks.  However, there should be some form of contact to the editor as rarely will they be in touch unless someone referred you to them or they have you in mind for something possible in future.  So, although it is a bit of a guessing game reach out to them – you may be on their "to do" list but a little push is good and better to be proactive on your end.

D. What is it that you look for in a photographer generally? What sort of factors enter into your decision to work with a photographer? Be honest and think broadly: personality factors, professional experience, professional manner, their aesthetics or viewpoint, previous recommendations or an inside contact, the resume or reputation of the photographer (if any), agency representation or the fact that they are independent, whatever enters into the equation.  Being a professional through and through is the single most important factor, also how you represent your work is crucial.  If you go in there with " I brought some of my stuff for you to look at" introduction you’re losing the editor. They want to know that your work is more than just "your stuff" it is important to you, your committed, your a thinking/active journalist and you want to start a relationship with the publication in a serious, professional way.  Personality is also important as one’s rapport with others gives an idea of how things may go with your approach to people out in the field. Obviously things aren’t the same sitting in an office with an editor and being in the field but if a magazine etc. editor is working with you it is based on a relationship.  Look the relationship doesn’t have to be all roses it can even be contentious etc. but that is after you begin working with them and it is a matter of give / take, compromise, brainstorming etc. which has its ups and downs like any other relationship – but the one thing that remains constant is your professionalism and theirs.

E. As for contractual matters, how do you prefer to see the photographers handle things like expenses and fees and the like? Are there any things that photographers do that you would want to encourage or discourage? Keep your expenses/receipts well documented as best you can and not on toilet paper jammed into a ziploc baggie crumpled up in small balls.

F. What is your general advice to new photographers without contacts who want to break into the business? What should they be doing to get recognition or to get editors to start paying attention?  If you have no contacts – meet your fellow photographers, meet writers, meet editors etc. at social gatherings – exhibition openings etc. approach them, introduce yourself, it’s not easy but a good part of jumping into this world is that of networking whether you are in NY, London or attending Perpignan.  


Cheers, more later.  Will contact editors at mag’s to get them to respond to this as well.

Bye for now from beirut

Sheryl


by [former member] | 17 Feb 2006 05:02 | Beirut, Lebanon | | Report spam→
Thanks Jon,for your questions and thanks Sheryl and Robert Fulton for your precious answers.
I am courious to see other editors’point of view…..
cheers
Andrea

by [former member] | 17 Feb 2006 05:02 | London, United Kingdom | | Report spam→
Jon, thanks for starting this thread; please consider posting the unexpurgated replies that you are receiving (instead of summarizing them). Thanks also to Robert and Sheryl for posting their thoughtful replies.

W


by Wayne E. Yang | 17 Feb 2006 06:02 | | Report spam→
Wayne, that will be impossible.  They have to be oganized and summarized if we are to present them in a clear form that enables adequate understanding. YOu have no idea how long this is going to be.  There is too much material.  I promise though that the summaries will not be bland renderings.  The meat will all be there.


by Jon Anderson | 17 Feb 2006 07:02 | Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic | | Report spam→
Hi, Jon,

I was hoping that avoiding all that summarizing and editing—posting the thoughts more directly here (sans identifiers, of course) would make it easier for you. Sorry if I misunderstand. Looking forward to seeing the posts. Thanks much for volunteering to do this.

W


by Wayne E. Yang | 17 Feb 2006 08:02 (ed. Feb 17 2006) | | Report spam→
Jon, please let me know if I can be of any assistance.

by Jenny Lynn Walker | 17 Feb 2006 09:02 (ed. Feb 17 2006) | London, United Kingdom | | Report spam→
Hoo boy. Thanks for asking. I’ll do my best in responding. Some questions I can’t answer or don’t pertain as I’m in a different situation being a wire editor.

A. What are the best ways to approach an editor, either with a specific story pitch, or a more general appeal for work, using one’s previous work as evidence of the ability to carry out such work?  What is the preferred medium these days to show one’s work - website, pdf files, html pages, hard copy portfolios?
B. What sort of approaches work best? Should photographers research the magazines and make proposals with the magazine’s special interests in mind? Make a very specific approach or just show their general work?


S
tory pitches don’t work for me as I’m usually set with what the Bureau is writing about. I’m looking more for photographers that can photograph the stories we have.

I like seeing websites, .pdf files work, too. If you’re going to come in and see me, I’d want to see something more than what I have already seen that you’ve directed me to/attached to your email.


C. Having decided upon a particular means of introducing one’s work to an editor, how should a photographer proceed? If one sends an email or mailer, should one call the editor after a given period to follow up and discuss the matter further? Should one make repeated mailings? Sometimes silence is hard to interpret, and it is certainly frustrating to the photographer after making an effort to present the work,  so what can we do to clarify things a bit without being importunate?

I never mind emails. And I usually respond to all (ok, I’m a strange one in the bunch) emails. What I don’t care for are phone messages left on my voice mail for me to call someone back that I don’t know. Yes, I’m always looking for freelancers and I don’t have a lot of work to give, but when I get the request from the word editors, I want to be prepared with a freelancer anywhere. I can respond in my own time on email and also file it away in the proper folder. Voice mails from people I don’t know asking me to call them back don’t put me in a good mood. Keep trying me. I don’t like cold calls from photographers saying they are in town and want to show me their work. A little advance notice helps.

D. What is it that you look for in a photographer generally? What sort of factors enter into your decision to work with a photographer? Be honest and think broadly: personality factors, professional experience, professional manner, their aesthetics or viewpoint, previous recommendations or an inside contact, the resume or reputation of the photographer (if any), agency representation or the fact that they are independent, whatever enters into the equation.

I’ll use anyone once. <grin> After that the question is, what makes me want to use a photographer again? Aside from getting great photos, personality helps. Punctuality in getting me invoices, etc. Recommendations from other editors helps. I also don’t mind being alerted to movements I often get emails from photographers saying they’re going to be someplace for X amount of time, should I be needing anything. I keep those handy because you just never know.

E. As for contractual matters, how do you prefer to see the photographers handle things like expenses and fees and the like? Are there any things that photographers do that you would want to encourage or discourage?

We try to pay fairly promptly, and pay all expenses. I don’t care for photographers, though, who add in certain expenses on a two-hour shoot (like lunch). A day’s shoot, or several days, is one thing. But a quick portrait of someone that lives in your hometown is another. And make sure you send all the receipts with your expenses. Accounting doesn’t like invoices without documentation. It also helps to be kept apprised as to when you’re shooting. Sometimes I’ll give the freelancer the name and number of the subject and ask them to set it up. An email back to me letting me know when it’s been set up and when I should expect photos is quite helpful.

F. What is your general advice to new photographers without contacts who want to break into the business? What should they be doing to get recognition or to get editors to start paying attention?

I always recommend going to conferences and such. If not to learn from other photographers at the conferences/workshops, you can network with other photographers and editors. Make a point of at least saying hi to the editors. If they have time to look at your stuff there, great. If not, ask if you can send an email with samples or to set up an interview.

Phew. There it is. If I think of more, I’ll add.

by Linda Epstein | 17 Feb 2006 13:02 (ed. Feb 17 2006) | Washington, DC, United States | | Report spam→
So far, So  Good,  Hopefully when they get the time, the rest of the editors will start to pitch in.  Anyway, we are looking at at least two weeks to gather data, so keep ‘em comin’ and dont worry about tardiness.

Willem de Lange: that was a good point you made, and I am sorry I didnt make it clear initially.  Many photogs now live outside the usual media centers, and I believe this is a viable option nowadays.  But it does place us at a disadvantage for such crucial steps as meeting with editors face to face or delivering hard-copy portfolios (just too expensive to mail).  Lemme see if I can insert this idea somewhere.

PS: Willem I added the query to section C.


by Jon Anderson | 18 Feb 2006 15:02 (ed. Feb 18 2006) | Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic | | Report spam→
Dont be shy folks.  I got a few more PMs over the weekend, let’s see if we can wrap this thing up by the end of this week or next.  Pitch in, anything at all, no need to answer all the questions.


by Jon Anderson | 20 Feb 2006 06:02 | Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic | | Report spam→

Hope that more Europeans editors will also jump in with their comments, too. I hate to say it, but it really seems that European photography world is somehow lazy. Generally speaking, of course. If I’m wrong, please shout back at me.

by G. Muj | 20 Feb 2006 07:02 (ed. Feb 20 2006) | Stockholm, Sweden | | Report spam→
I myself am very interested in the last question, as that’s the position I’m in right now.  I know almost nobody in the field and am still in school; it’s very difficult to even figure out where to send a portfolio for summer employment.

-Christopher


by Christopher Guess | 20 Feb 2006 17:02 | Madison, United States | | Report spam→
Jon, thanks again for the questions!

Would love to hear more input from other photogs as well- not just the editors…

Much love,
-Erin

by Erin Siegal | 20 Feb 2006 19:02 | New York, United States | | Report spam→
Jon, I am quite new at LS and I have to confess that you are surprising me – I wasn’t expecting such a devotion to photographic matter. Attitudes like yours are absolutely amazing!!
Of course things like that are fantastic for photographers, they are terrific for editors too, once they will be receiving contact calls the way they like it. But most of all, it is excellent for photography as a medium – you are binding together two halfs of the same object, connecting common interests towards one consolidated thing: mass visual communication. Photographers need publication (in the broadest sense of the word) the same way magazines (or newspapers, or the web, or whatever…) need quality images.
The usual problem is that these "two groups" are separated by invisible walls, always complaining about each others behavior.
Opening this forum, you are driving "us and them" to something near a consensus. And who is benefited? Both sides? I guess something bigger than that, the photographic culture and its consumers – if they really exist……
Thanks for your unselfishness,
anderson

by Anderson Schneider | 23 Feb 2006 06:02 (ed. Feb 23 2006) | Brasilia, Brazil | | Report spam→
Jon is very giving……he has been around a long time and I think he sees a much bigger picture than many.

by [former member] | 23 Feb 2006 07:02 | new orleans, United States | | Report spam→
Almost half a century and counting (loosely) — but i am relatively new to photography.  switched careers late in life.  No, it is just the teacher in me.  But i will tell you a little story.   When I first joined Black Star I was assigned along with some other phtogs to cover the Yankee victory parade on Wall Street.  I could care less about such matters, and while I was there all I did was photograph the excessive enthusiasm of the crowd and their idiotic behavior, which I love.  Needless to say, my images were not well received, and nor were they, to be honest, particularly good.  however, another BS photog, known for her excellent use of color, turned in some great stuff, and I complimented her on it.  The photographer was taken aback, really didnt seem to know how to deal with the compliment, because frankly photographers are all too often competing against one another rather than helping one another (though, there are plenty of helpful, generous souls out there too — it is just that the nature of the biz is such that it isolates us and pits us one against the other).  I also remember what it was like trying to get help from established photographers, asking them for recommendations and such.  Not generally a happy memory.  I determined after that experience never to allow my competitive urges to get the better of me, always to cooperate, help, encourage, and share. 

When Teru came along with LS, I jumped on it, and sure enough so far it has lived up to my expectations.  This site has a completely different feeling to it, because it is based in a community spirit and the overarching ethic is one of cooperation.  sure, we have our spats, but the ethos here is incredible.  Through it I have been able to connect up with all sorts of people that I would never have been able to meet otherwise.  And as part of that ethos, we are trying to put together helpfull little guides that shed light on various aspects of the business so that people who are at a loss can consult them and firm up their professional practice.  Hey, on certain matters, I am just as lost as the rest.  So we will have an article on agencies, an article on editorial protocols, and an article on grant writing, for starters. 

i dont know if we can forge a consensus; I think things wont change much, and unfortunately, whatever your professional practice, contacts and luck still count for a lot.  But it is better to behave professionally than to be embarrassed by making mistakes that no one ever thought to correct for you. 

PS: it may seem that not many editors are answering this thread, but in fact the PMs are trickling in, and some have promised to respond the moment they get some free time.  But if any of you know some editors who would be willing to contribute, by all means get the word out, apply a little gentle pressure.  Thanks.


by Jon Anderson | 23 Feb 2006 07:02 (ed. Feb 23 2006) | Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic | | Report spam→
Yes thank you very much Jon for starting this forum you are a very giving member of lightstalkers!  I see you paricipating in so many topics/issues and you have loads of good stuff to say.
This particular forum is an unvaluable source of info for some1 like me who has never approached an editor before… but I intend to soon.
Thanks again
Chiara
p.s. thanks also for helping me when i was looking for info on digital cameras!


by Chiara Grioni | 23 Feb 2006 12:02 | London, United Kingdom | | Report spam→
Just to let people know the status so far: i have continued to recieve answers to the survey, but I am waiting just a little longer to be sure that I have a nice broad range of editorial expertise,a dn then I will summarize and post the results.

You might notice that there is a new link in the Resources section, under Legal Advice, which will take you to a thread in which Sion Touhig explains copyright and just what it is you do when you license your imagery.  That is now a permanent link in the resources section, and I will handle the results of the editorial survey in the same manner by posting them in a thread, and then providing a permanent link to that thread in the Resources section.  We also will have an "article" on grant writing, whcih is a bit long so I may have to come up with a different manner of making available to you, and the next survey will involve Photo Agencies — which i meant to get to sooner but well so it goes.    If there are other topics you think need treating, fire away — or take it up yourself and add it to the Resources section.


by Jon Anderson | 06 Mar 2006 09:03 | Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic | | Report spam→

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Participants

Jon Anderson, Photographer & Writer Jon Anderson
Photographer & Writer
Ocala Florida , United States
John Robert Fulton Jr., Photographs John Robert Fulton Jr.
Photographs
Spring Lake, Michigan , United States
Erik Lacson, Photographer Erik Lacson
Photographer
Manila , Philippines
Nayan Sthankiya, Visual Journalist Nayan Sthankiya
Visual Journalist
Saskatoon , Canada
Ruediger Carl Bergmann, Photographer / Artist Ruediger Carl Bergmann
Photographer / Artist
Augsburg , Germany ( MUC )
Jenny Lynn Walker, Homo Sapien Jenny Lynn Walker
Homo Sapien
London , United Kingdom
Willem de Lange, Photographer Willem de Lange
Photographer
Johannesburg , South Africa
Wayne E. Yang, Writer/Photographer Wayne E. Yang
Writer/Photographer
Kaoshiung , Taiwan
Linda Epstein, Senior Picture Editor Linda Epstein
Senior Picture Editor
Washington, Dc , United States
G. Muj, designer / ex photog / G. Muj
designer / ex photog /
Doha , Qatar
Christopher Guess, Documentary Photojournali Christopher Guess
Documentary Photojournali
Brooklyn , United States ( LGA )
Erin Siegal, Photographer & Writer Erin Siegal
Photographer & Writer
Tijuana , Mexico
Anderson Schneider, Photojournalist Anderson Schneider
Photojournalist
Brasilia , Brazil ( BSB )
Chiara Grioni, Photographer Chiara Grioni
Photographer
London , United Kingdom


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