.
  Lightstalkers
* My Profile My Galleries My Networks

Fuji X pro 1 is any good?

I know, I know, is some provocative but is Fuji X pro 1 any good? anyone have experience working, and I repeat WORKING, with it? Many thanks

by Hernan Zenteno at 2012-06-13 02:43:57 UTC | Bookmark | | Report spam→

Hi Hernán,
don’t have any experience with it (I make myself the same question) but you may want to check Tewfic El-Sawy’s blog:
http://thetravelphotographer.blogspot.com.ar/2012/06/fuji-x-pro-1-shooting-from-hipvivid-vs.html
Saludos!

by Patricio Murphy | 14 Jun 2012 02:06 | Buenos Aires, Argentina | | Report spam→
Thanks Patricio. I read this before but checking this site again I found this link at the bottom of the page that have a lot of news about this camera,
http://www.scoop.it/t/fuji-x-pro1

by Hernan Zenteno | 14 Jun 2012 13:06 | Buenos Aires, Argentina | | Report spam→
Given the difficulty of focusing with autofocus as Tewfic and others have mentioned, especially when shooting from the hip, I wonder which method would give a greater degree of success— the camera’s autofocus system or manually pre-focusing?

by Barry Milyovsky | 14 Jun 2012 14:06 | Manhattan, United States | | Report spam→
On a side note, have two friends shooting with the X100 and love it. Yesterday one was with his EOS 1 and the Fuji, and he was completely sold to the X100 high iso quality, told me he was amazed. I got to play a bit with one, and the fixed 35mm f/2 is amazing.

by Patricio Murphy | 15 Jun 2012 11:06 | Buenos Aires, Argentina | | Report spam→
Hey Patricio…yep the X100 really is an amazing camera – it’s not good for all jobs, but it really does take incredible images

by Matthew Richards | 15 Jun 2012 14:06 | Bangkok, Thailand | | Report spam→
i’ve been using the xpro-1 for about a month now. really enjoy using it, and the files are excellent. wouldn’t recommend it for action shots, but other than that it’s great for travel and documentary work. for this camera i think it really depends on the photographer and what they’re shooting. will be posting some recent work with the xpro-1 on my website in the next few days, will post here if interested.

by Allan Lissner | 15 Jun 2012 16:06 | Toronto, Canada | | Report spam→
Hi Allan. Yes, I will appreciate any share about how were your pics. My single mint believe that if an m6 focus can’t be better than the autofocus of the Pro 1, then the X pro is a system to explore. I am too far?

by Hernan Zenteno | 15 Jun 2012 18:06 | Buenos Aires, Argentina | | Report spam→
I don’t understand the thinking of these manufacturers that are making Leica-like digital cameras with significant shutter lags (Allan – “wouldn’t recommend it for action shots”). Most of us would be interested in them to use for close-action (such as “street”) photography. If they suffer big shutter lags, they are useless in those circumstances. Leica itself has partially solved the lag problem in its digital series by avoiding autofocus. Couldn’t these other manufacturers do the same?

Oh, and BTW, if you put these Fuji cameras (X100, XPro-1) on “manual,” what effect does that have on shutter lag?

by Neal Jackson | 16 Jun 2012 11:06 | Washington, DC, United States | | Report spam→

’Couldn’t have said it any better Neal. I remember the “timing” involved with P&S digitals. The I tried a (“Is it any good…”) Leica M8. I’d gone to pick up my son at his school. He was running toward me at top speed with a smile on his face. The M8 with the 28mm just nailed it. Half a second later he nailed me, but that’s another story. To this day (with the M8.2 I bought) I still tend to shoot a split second early.

It’s too bad they can’t put a menu item that you tick that says “just shoot the picture, focus and exposure be damned”.

by John Robert Fulton Jr. | 16 Jun 2012 16:06 | Spring Lake, Michigan, United States | | Report spam→
Focusing M cameras is always more slow than an autofocus system. I know since I use an m6 and a CL for my personal photos and Canon 5 d’s and Mark III for my job. And with and M mount adapter one can use the deep of field focusing method so we only have to press the shutter like with a M system. The questions is, are this really working in the real life?
Any comment of a Fuji X pro 1 user?

by Hernan Zenteno | 17 Jun 2012 01:06 | Buenos Aires, Argentina | | Report spam→
Well, I have an M6 with a 35mm Summicron, and I have a lot of terrific shots that I took on infinity, with the thing set on f8 and 1/60 of a second (it’s in conformity with the old exhortation “f8 and be there!”). But of course it’s film, which limits options. I just wonder why the manufacturers are missing this point.

But, again, who has shot these cameras in manual and what effect does that have on shutter lag?

by Neal Jackson | 17 Jun 2012 03:06 | Washington, DC, United States | | Report spam→
@Neal there is a way to negate the issue of shutter lag on the X100 using zone focusing as described in a forum topic here: http://www.fujix-forum.com/index.php?/topic/2050-zone-focusing-with-the-fuji-x100/

It works well enough for me on the X100, but have not bought an X-Pro1 so can’t say how that would perform.

by Matthew Richards | 17 Jun 2012 06:06 | Bangkok, Thailand | | Report spam→
Thanks, Matt, that’s helpful enough so I think it ought to be posted here, and I’m going to take the liberty to do so:

“Zone Focusing:

“To Zone Focus with the Fuji X100, put the camera in Manual Focus mode (side switch, top position). Next, press the AFL/AEL button to focus on a test subject around the average distance you plan to photograph people, say 10 feet away (make sure the focus box is totally on the object in the view screen). Now, for example, at F16, everything you photograph between 5 feet and 30 feet should be in focus (assuming your shutter speed is fast enough). This is your “depth of field” or DOF."

“In Manual mode you should see a “depth of field” scale at the bottom of your view screen. Everything in white should be in focus range. Note, the X100 depth of field scale is a little conservative (firmware 1.10)."

“One advantage to Zone Focusing (and Manual Focusing) is the shutter release will respond instantly, and you can shot repeatedly without having to refocus. I often lock in my focus on a parking meter 6 feet away at F11, and then I photograph people between 5 and 10 feet away. Zone Focusing works better during the day when you have plenty of light.”

“Hyperfocal Distance Focus Method:

“Hyperfocal Distance is setting your manual focus “depth of field” between one distance, and infinity. To do this, set up Zone Focusing as described above. Lets say you focus on an object at 10 feet away at F16. Your DOF should now be 5 to 30 feet. Now simply turn the focus ring on the lens until your see the white DOF bar in your view screen reach infinity on the right end of the scale. Now anything you photograph from 6 feet on to infinity should be in focus."

by Neal Jackson | 17 Jun 2012 16:06 | Washington, DC, United States | | Report spam→
Shutter lag hasn’t been an issue for me, once i’ve locked focus and exposure it’s easy enough to capture a precise moment. What is frustrating is the time it takes between shots, so if you’re used to using a dslr like a machine gun you’ll have to change your shooting style and will probably not enjoy the xpro1. If you’ve used a film rangefinder (which i never have myself) i would think that it would feel very natural to you when you have to slow down and patiently wait for the right moment because you’ve only got one shot to nail it.

Here are a couple assignments i’ve shot over the past month or two with the xpro1:
http://allan.lissner.net/neskantaga-first-nation-we-love-our-land/
http://allan.lissner.net/grassy-narrows-marches-for-clean-water-and-justice/

The first link is where the xp1 really shone. I also brought a dslr (d300s) with me on that trip because I had doubts about the xp1. But in the end, of the 61 images posted, only four from this selection were taken with my dslr. After the first couple of days the dslr didn’t even leave my bag. For a job involving lots of travel, time in the bush, and working with remote communities that aren’t used to being photographed, the xpro1 was ideal (i do wish it was weather sealed though). If they added an intervalometer to the xp1 in a firmware update, I would have no reason to bring a dslr for similar jobs.

The second shoot was tougher for the xp1, a protest march. It was much more difficult working with the xp1 in these conditions, no surprise there. But even here over half of this selection were taken with the xp1, so it still held its own. For future events like these though, where things change quickly and unpredictably, i’ll be sticking to my dslrs.

so, different tools for different jobs. the xpro1 has been a valuable addition to my toolbox, but you’ll be disappointed if you’re expecting a mini-dslr.

by Allan Lissner | 17 Jun 2012 18:06 | Toronto, Canada | | Report spam→
I’m in. Now have to get the money. And many thanks Allan for share your shoots.

by Hernan Zenteno | 17 Jun 2012 19:06 (ed. Jun 17 2012) | Buenos Aires, Argentina | | Report spam→
I think i might join a “fab-lab” community and make my own camera… ;o)

by Yves Choquette | 18 Jun 2012 00:06 | Montreal, Canada, Canada | | Report spam→
I bought one on Friday, I am returning it today.
There is nothing “Wrong” with it, but there are a few little things that just bug me.

I cant really put my finger on it, all the right functions are there, but it does not work for me.

Back to the Leica M8, yes I know that the Fuji images are WAY better, but the Leica just feels better to work with.

Just my 2c worth….

by Shayne Robinson | 18 Jun 2012 10:06 | Johannesburg, South Africa | | Report spam→
first upload latest firm ware, this seemed to make a big difference in the shutter lag department and auto focus even though fuji doesn’t really advertise this in their new firmware.’then set to manual focus and use the thumb button AEL to auto focus here and there, kinda like a zone system. this is a valid little camera for 1200 bucks

by Eros Hoagland | 18 Jun 2012 10:06 | Tijuana, Mexico | | Report spam→
Sorry to revive. I love both my XP1 and X100 and have since retired my dSLR (D3 and D3s) Initially t he XP1 was slow, but the new FW release last month has doubled the speed of the camera. Anyone who wants to go the Leica route w/o spending t hat sort of cash should consider one.

by Aaron J. Heiner | 26 Oct 2012 21:10 | Washington DC, United States | | Report spam→
Herman, if you still interested in the Xpro or Xe1 you should join the FB group: FUJI XPRO1 & X-E1 FOR PHOTOGRAPHERS run by Nicolas Fauqué. You will find very good advices on both cameras. Tell me if you want to join…

by Yves Choquette | 26 Oct 2012 22:10 | Montreal, Canada, Canada | | Report spam→
Yes Ives. I am and sponge about more info but I need to update that I ended getting a XP1. I am very happy with it and more after the 2.0 firmware update that improved a lot the speed of focus. I used the Fuji for my extra jobs apart of my newspaper work with the 35 1.4 fuji and other m mount lenses, 21 f4 voigtlander, 50 dual range summicron and lately I used briefly a 90 2.8 thin and old Leica. My worst worries now are that I read that never will be peak focus in a new firmware, then the problem with the legacy lenses that the OVF lines are weak and almost invisible in real light (this is a huge bad thin to me cause I choose XP1 because I like to work with OVF instead the EVF, otherwise I would choose the x E1) and the hard news that in case Fuji release in the future a full frame XP camera all the lenses of the XP1 will not work. I was waiting the release of the 23 1.4 of fuji but now I am wondering if will be better a 24 lens of Carl Zeiss that can be useful too for my M6 that still is working in black and white and will be useful with a full frame XP.
I don’t mention all the good things because there are a lot in internet: great quality, light equipment, excellent primes, etc. So my firsts worries are: can Fuji do a firmware to get accurate and visible frames for the OVF, including legacy lenses (non fuji lenses) and peak focus indicator? I think I can live with other minor, for me, things. This little camera can make top quality photos but you need to take your time with non fuji lenses.

by Hernan Zenteno | 27 Oct 2012 02:10 | Buenos Aires, Argentina | | Report spam→
By the way, I remember another odd thing that is a bit annoying. The XP1 can sync at 160 or 180 with flashes. But you only have 125 or 250, not a x speed in between. As a professional I work with manual settings in camera for my flash portraits. This little speed is needed if one have to do a portrait at 13, 14 or 15 hours. I can’t understand why with film we can get with some cameras 250 and 500 of speed. Now include with the Canon Mark III D of the newspaper I can’t use more than 200. With the old Nikon D1 we can shoot 500 without problems. I can’t understand that thing. But maybe this is another topic. Note: obviously the speeds I mentioned are 1/500, 1/160, etc

by Hernan Zenteno | 27 Oct 2012 02:10 | Buenos Aires, Argentina | | Report spam→
I’ve been using an X-Pro1 since launch in 2012. It’s a very useful little camera, the high ISO preformance is a considerable improvement over my 5DmkII. It has a few quirks but if you’ve used a range finder there’s not so much of a learning curve. The new firmware 2.0 makes the camera much faster, however hyper focal focusing is still the best way to stop action. I should mention the colours, skin tones are really good, white balance is good also and automatic exposure’s not bad either. The only thing that lets this camera down is third party support for RAW (.RAF) processing, to get the best results files are best converted to JPEG in camera.

by Matthew Aslett | 30 Oct 2012 00:10 (ed. Oct 30 2012) | London, United Kingdom | | Report spam→
HI Matthew. I tested the last Adobe converter and in my opinion all this watercolor effect is cause the poor sharpen of Lightroom (LR). Silkypix or whatever the name of the current Fuji software apply a sharpen effect after the raw sharpen, when you save the image. This add the extra detail. I can get better sharpness with LR and then with PS. But the main thing is that you need both softwares to get an almost perfect image. Yes, I would like a better raw but since I always am working with Canon jpg files day to day, I really don’t bother get another file from fuji. My worst problems are from my comments above. I really want to use all the potential of my m lenses and, in spite I like a lot fuji lenses, I own a 35 1.4, makes non sense to purchase more fuji lenses that will have no utility in new come cameras.

by Hernan Zenteno | 30 Oct 2012 02:10 | Buenos Aires, Argentina | | Report spam→
Thanks Hernan, to be honest I sold my M glass a couple of years back, but agree, the frame lines could be better, and yes buying into a whole new camera system can be an expensive acquisition. It’s difficult trying to find camera compatible with legacy glass, especially as compact digital camera systems are designed preliminary for auto-focus lenses. I like the look of the Fuji images a lot and use it for both assignments and breaking news, thus far its not let me down.

by Matthew Aslett | 30 Oct 2012 09:10 | London, United Kingdom | | Report spam→

Get notified when someone replies to this thread:
Feed-icon-10x10 via RSS
Recommended
Icon_email via email
You can unsubscribe later.

More about sponsorship→

Participants

Hernan Zenteno, Photographer Hernan Zenteno
Photographer
Buenos Aires , Argentina ( EZE )
Patricio Murphy, Musician, photographer Patricio Murphy
Musician, photographer
Buenos Aires , Argentina
Barry Milyovsky, totally unprofessional Barry Milyovsky
totally unprofessional
(emperor of ice cream )
New York , United States
Matthew Richards, Photojournalist Matthew Richards
Photojournalist
Mae Fah Luang , Thailand
Allan Lissner, Multimedia Producer Allan Lissner
Multimedia Producer
Big Trout Lake , Canada
Neal Jackson, Neal Jackson
(Flaneur, Savant and Scapegrace)
Washington, Dc , United States ( IAD )
John Robert Fulton Jr., Photographs John Robert Fulton Jr.
Photographs
Spring Lake, Michigan , United States
Yves Choquette, Photojournalist Yves Choquette
Photojournalist
Montreal , Canada
Shayne Robinson, Photojournalist Shayne Robinson
Photojournalist
(Have passport - Will Travel)
Johannesburg , South Africa
Eros Hoagland, photographer Eros Hoagland
photographer
Tijuana , Mexico ( TIJ )
Aaron J. Heiner, Photojournalist Aaron J. Heiner
Photojournalist
(Sleeping his life away)
Baltimore, Md , United States ( IAD )
Matthew Aslett, Documentary Photographer Matthew Aslett
Documentary Photographer
Killis , Turkey


Keywords

Top↑ | RSS/XML | Privacy Statement | Terms of Use | support@lightstalkers.org / ©2004-2014 November Eleven