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Guiness Record for Nonpayer companies...

Ive been waiting so long for an invoice to be payed.
I would like to sue them but finally they PAy….
We can make a ranking for this “wonderful people” that waits 8 fucking months to PAy and invoice.
well I start the ranking with :

FRONT MAG (UK) 8 months

by David Coll Blanco at 2007-10-22 12:12:15 UTC (ed. Mar 12 2008 ) Tokyo , Japan | Bookmark | | Report spam→

hachette livre, france, nine months if you have good luck and a big disccount for whatever.

by Hernan Zenteno | 22 Oct 2007 13:10 (ed. Nov 15 2007) | Buenos Aires, Argentina | | Report spam→
In Viaggio & Bell’Europa, Italy: 12 (twelve) months!
what do i win? :)

by Massimo Pizzocaro | 22 Oct 2007 14:10 | Athens, Greece | | Report spam→
26 months! That is a long time.

by Tomoko Yamamoto | 22 Oct 2007 16:10 | Baltimore, MD, United States | | Report spam→
I know damn well that many publishing houses rely on the ‘flexibility’ of their freelancers to help keep themselves liquid.
Ideally you invoice and get paid on 30 days credit (or whatever your own local credit terms are).

Some Publishers do a budget for each issue of the magazine so that they have to get money off advertisers and copy sales so they can pay contributors – this is horse shit as it’s not any freelancers problem if the publishers cant keep on top of their own finances and keep themselves liquid. Publishers also rely on the fact that some freelancers will just get bored of ringing, faxing and emailing for their invoices so persevere if not for yourself for the rest of us.

I believe the Swedes have a nice law whereby any invoice (or utility bill even) unpaid after a small number of days can be bought to a small claims court and processed instantly.

While everyone’s getting them out and comparing my longest is 6 months ;)

by Con O'Donoghue | 22 Oct 2007 16:10 | Barcelona, Spain | | Report spam→
Assignment shot for Latin CEO magazine (part of EastGate Media, LLC) on Dec. 9, 2001 and never paid. Even after months of calling and emailing editor-in-chief after photo editor quit, all I got was promises of “next week we’ll pay.” Then, suddenly, Latin CEO magazine disappears and the publishing company – still in operation and still starting new magazines – refuses to pay even with a Miami lawyer sending a letter for immediate payment. I gave up a few years ago trying to get paid. Fortunately it is the only client I have had (knock on wood) to not pay.

by Dean C.K. Cox | 22 Oct 2007 18:10 | Noby Fridhem (home), Sweden | | Report spam→
The administration of the city of Roubaix, France, received me and 3 other photograhers in 2001 on their big fancy red velvet chairs with coffee in plastic cups to have all their cultural attaches speak to us about the city and to explain about their cultural development we were to show in lieu of them becomming the cultural capital of Europe … we did the work … exhitbited in Insite’s space… still awaiting our measly reimbursement of trips and exhibition prints…. after 2 years of resending the invoice, gave up.

by Gina van Hoof | 22 Oct 2007 18:10 | brussels, Belgium | | Report spam→
Pequod Edition, Italy. 8 months also, they then reprinted 4 more editions of the book with my photo on the cover without ever telling me, by the time I noticed and filed suit, they had filed bankrupcy – bastards.

by Gina van Hoof | 22 Oct 2007 18:10 | brussels, Belgium | | Report spam→
I add a clause to all my contracts.

Payment is due after 30 days of the bill being issued.

If no payment is done a 20% penalty fee will be aded to the final bill.

My clients agree to it and sign.

If not then I do not take the job.

TS

by Tomas Stargardter | 22 Oct 2007 20:10 (ed. Oct 22 2007) | Managua, Nicaragua | | Report spam→
Guys I think naming and shaming clients is highly unprofessional, I understand the frustration trust me but I think you are cutting your nose off to spite your face in doing so!

by Charlie Gray | 22 Oct 2007 23:10 | London, United Kingdom | | Report spam→
i think waiting 26 months to pay a photographer for his work is unprofessional.

by Michael Bowring | 22 Oct 2007 23:10 | Belgrade, Serbia | | Report spam→
Photographers should not have to subsidize clients. It’s wrong and it’s pathetic.

I will not name those organizations that have shat on me, rather I will name the University of Scranton in PA as the best client ever for timely payment. Not days but hours in my experience. And they pay by PayPal which suits me and my working methods. Well cool.

by Paul Treacy | 23 Oct 2007 00:10 | New York City, United States | | Report spam→
Cmon Charlie who is the “unprofessional”,
We name the companies and I dont feel any shame for that.They have to feel ashamed if they read this post.
For the moment the winner is

1st Epiloges Mag. Thessaloniki 26 months aka 2,2 years.

Special jury prize for " The administration of the city of Roubaix"

by David Coll Blanco | 23 Oct 2007 01:10 | Tokyo, Japan | | Report spam→
Charlie say’s it right, slagging off clients on a forum is not professional. There are proper ways to handle non-payment problems.

btw, saying you’ve been waiting “8 fucxing” months, 6 month 12 months or (give me a break) 2.2 years only shows poor business practices on your part.

Photography as a profession includes sound business management.

by . | 23 Oct 2007 03:10 | Victoria, Canada | | Report spam→
In my case (12 months) I was warned about this payment delay by a friend when I first worked with these magazines about 10 years ago. I adjusted my fees including the interests and I still work with them. Plain business, no secrets about it!
On the other hand, I can’t see the difference between “stealing” one of your pictures and “not paying for using” one… what do business and professionalism have to do with it?
from my side, thanks to anybody pointing out ‘potentially bad’ clients

by Massimo Pizzocaro | 23 Oct 2007 06:10 | Athens, Greece | | Report spam→
Kim, I take great offense to you claiming that if a client refuses to pay it is poor business practices on the part of the photographer. I make sure every client I work with is ONLY on contract. I have not been paid by this one client (see above) because the magazine folded and they were criminal about not paying me and other contributors. I shot many assignments for the magazine before and was always paid. But not for the last assignment, which was a one day shoot at $500. The publishing house of the magazine is based in Miami, Fla. I live in Sweden. For me to take the company in small claims court for breach of contract will cost me more than what I will eventually get in return. I have even had a copyright attorney in Miami mail the publishing company – but there was no response. Face it, there are bad companies in every profession. Why can’t you say that some of those companies are just crooked or show poor business practices. Many of them do not pay for months, as you can read from other photographers in this post. If you have not suffered a loss of payment or have not had payment for months overdue even though a contract stipulates when payment is due, then good for you. I hope you never do experience what many – probably hundreds or thousands – of freelancers do around the world. If you profess to have a fail-safe way of making sure every client pays, then I challenge you to help me get paid for my assignment – now more than six years late. If you are able, I will give you all of what I am owed.

by Dean C.K. Cox | 23 Oct 2007 06:10 | Noby Fridhem (home), Sweden | | Report spam→
I also have that clause which says payement is due within 30 days or a 20% increase in price will be incurred at the bottom of my contracts…. doesn’t help with those who keep saying it will be paid with this month’s bills month after month, I’ve even had some pay after the 30 day period ignoring the 20% increase – what can you do – I don’t call it poor business practice on our part Kim – theirs rather – and they know we won’t waste our time and money on making another 25 calls abroad, and getting a letter written by a lawyer for didlywinks.

by Gina van Hoof | 23 Oct 2007 11:10 | brussels, Belgium | | Report spam→
Kim and Charlie. Thank you for your comments but for me is more useful know who is who in our business to take care about how to deal or not in case we meet with this unprofessional practices. The entreprises approach you in base of references or curriculum, I want to know this information about the client too. Another thing, when you are overseas is more easy to this people give long time to pay their debts or not pay at all.

by Hernan Zenteno | 23 Oct 2007 13:10 (ed. Oct 23 2007) | Buenos Aires, Argentina | | Report spam→
I was called at 11am on December 9,2007 by Polaris Images to do a job for the London Sunday Times by noon in a location they did not know. I found the place in a hour and got the images they wanted. It is October 23,2007 and I still have not been paid. The Times claims they paid Eyevine (their rep in London), Eyevine claims they paid Polaris and Polaris claims Eyevine never paid.

This is the perfect case of unprofessional agents that do not give a f…. about stringers. I want to say that this is the first time this happens to me with regards to Polaris. I think Eyevine is full of crap !!!!!! Or maybe the Sunday Times too !!!!!

by Jose Jimenez-Tirado | 23 Oct 2007 14:10 | San Juan, United States | | Report spam→
I think that a public list of clients that do not pay photographers in a reasonable amount of time in a good idea. This way photographers won’t waste their time working with unprofessional clients.

These publications take advantage of unaware freelancers.

by Chico Sanchez | 23 Oct 2007 14:10 | Mexico City, Mexico | | Report spam→
another post related to this here

by Hernan Zenteno | 23 Oct 2007 15:10 | Buenos Aires, Argentina | | Report spam→
I found most payment issues can be solved by talking to the right persons. An editor is not the right person regarding payments problems. It’s the accounting department. A proper bill with a detailed description of what, when, where helps the account department a lot. Especially when they try to match incoming bills to the assignment budgets. Without a proper bill, yours might be floating around the accounting department for ever. Editors and the accounting staff mostly do not really talk to each other – that’s at least my experience. Put every possible detail on your bill, so the accountant directly knows to which assignment this bill belongs.

Of course some clients don’t pay on purpose. I write them a second bill. If they still don’t pay, I forward everything to an bill collecting company. But most cases caused by providing an inproper bill – and that’s of course a photographer’s fault. The accounting departments don’t have time to track down every unclear bill, they just wait until someone asks for his money.

I learned it the hard way myself. But I sat down with the account departments of several advertising agencies and some of my corporate clients. I learned a lot from them on how to make sure a bill is cleary understandable. They just do not need numbers only, they also need the informations as stated above. An accounting employee will mostly likely have no clue who you are and what you did for the company. So make sure he gets everything with your bill. Since I recieved those introductions, I never had anymore payment issues.

PS: All the accountant employees complained about a big amount of photographers not being able to write a proper bill. So get some business education and you’re set.

by Bastian Ehl | 23 Oct 2007 15:10 (ed. Oct 23 2007) | Magdeburg, Germany | | Report spam→
In eighteen years as a freelancer I can happily say I have only been not paid for a job once, that’s still one to many. Im currently on the 7 month mark with POSTMAGUSA, I have repeatedly sent invoices to the publisher, editor and accts people and have only received false promises. As other’s have mentioned it is indeed very important to get your detailed invoices to the ‘right’ people at these clients.

I have recently started a new practice with smaller magazine’s that are first time clients who tend to be notorious for late payment. I politly and professionally offer to them that once they decide on which photos of mine they want to use and how big so as to calculate the rate. Payment is due in full immediatly before I’ll send the hi-res files to them and to show good fath on my part I’ll give them the incentive of a 20% discount. Understand this is not going to work with say Conde Nast but you also dont have to worry about getting paid with them. I tell them this is the only way I can do buisiness with them at this time and you have to be prepared for possibly losing the sale. Surprisingly it has proven very succesfull and has not been met with to much resistance.

I learned about this method from some commercial photogs who were tired of waiting 3-6 months to be paid by Ad. agencies who were waiting to be paid by the main client. If you can save the Ad. agency a couple grand it might be in there best interest to front the payment, especially with smaller agencies.

by Bill Thomas | 23 Oct 2007 16:10 | NYC, United States | | Report spam→
There are five methods to dealing with non-paying clients:

1: Meet with the client in person.
2: File a claim in small claims court
3: Hire a lawyer
4: Go to a collection agency
5: Write it off, learn, and move on.

If you have nothing in writing, learn how to run a business.

Dean, afa “Kim, I take great offense to you claiming that if a client refuses to pay it is poor business practices on the part of the photographer.”, it is poor business practice if you don’t have a strategy in place to collect prior to accepting a job. Filing for payment in court (small claim or other) helps to protect you as a creditor if the client “goes out of business”.
Now if you’re still expecting a payment after six years “If you profess to have a fail-safe way of making sure every client pays, then I challenge you to help me get paid for my assignment – now more than six years late”, and you haven’t either sued or written it off, your business practices need upgrading.
Read Bastian’s reply, that’s a good sound approach, for both collecting and establishing a relationship with a new client.

by . | 23 Oct 2007 19:10 | Victoria, Canada | | Report spam→
Whereas I disagree with venting about a client or company on a public message board, I can understand the frustration and exasperation.

This is an open question, aimed at no one in particular…

If you did not have a contract in place prior to the job, what do you have that details the usage of the images? A handshake? Without a contract, you’re in the position of “donating” your work without a viable way of making a return.

With many of my clients, my contracts require either 1/3 of the total amount or 50% before. This deposit is a message to the client that I intend on being paid on time. I also require payment of certain jobs on the day-of or 5 business days after. The most lenient I’ve allowed is 30/60 days. I’ve yet to have a single client, from the biggest corporations in the world to individuals, default on payment.

When speaking about terms, I think being (politely) blunt and up front about payment is a neccessity. By bringing it up early and blending the topics of the job and payment into one, you project professionalism without a weak spine. I make it a point to detail how I streamline all my jobs and get work before or on time and expect the same from the client.

by [former member] | 23 Oct 2007 20:10 | Philadelphia, United States | | Report spam→
Well put Mustafah.
Photography at this level is a business, and needs to be run as one, otherwise you’re just shooting for donations.

by . | 23 Oct 2007 21:10 | Victoria, Canada | | Report spam→
Kim and Mustafah, thanks for all useful data you can give us. But for some comments you don´t sell news work overseas. Some are not real in practice because the time and different hours, hurry in others words. Kim, I can´t meet with the client in person, try at distance in a third world country a smal claim court. The same with hire a lawyer. Just with this post I try to learn who is who. I don´t see nothing wrong in it when all the comments are respectful. I would like to know the best clients to work for like said Tracy.

by Hernan Zenteno | 23 Oct 2007 22:10 | Buenos Aires, Argentina | | Report spam→
I don’t agree when someone says it’s unprofessional to name company that do not pay. If anyone is unprofessional here is the client that do not pay after we go out there, bust our buts and then they publish our images.

I think there should be a website directed only at pointing out the companies that do not pay. That way nobody will work for them and only then they will be forced to pay in time or go out of business. That way we watch each others backs. We should work together to solve a problem that is affecting too many people. I am sure there are a few out there that have the same problem and won’t say it openly for what ever reasons. This is a business and in this digital world we are struggling to cope with many new issues that affect everyone every day.

We do a job and we expect to get paid. I don’t give excuses when a deadline is set. I always deliver on time. I DO NOT WANT EXCUSES WHEN IT COMES TO MY CHECK !!!! It is very simple.

Lets burn every one out there that do not pay! They do not deserve our sympathy.

by Jose Jimenez-Tirado | 24 Oct 2007 00:10 (ed. Oct 24 2007) | San Juan, United States | | Report spam→
Jose, you run into a very fatal flaw: you assume every photographer is completely honest in “burning every one out there that do not pay”.

I’ll be the first to inform a client to “imagine if I took this long to deliver your time-sensitive photographs”, in so many words, but I’ll play devil’s advocate…

You must be careful with what you say and who you say it about. Not just about being professional, but being in the legal right. By assuming that each photographer who makes a claim is doing so in perfect honesty is ideal, but in the event that there is even the smallest amount of deceit, or mistaken assumption, then you cross the line from a list of companies to potential defamation.

Last time I checked, you can be libel for blogs and websites…

by [former member] | 24 Oct 2007 00:10 | Philadelphia, United States | | Report spam→
I highly recommend bookmarking this link: http://onlineliabilityblog.com

Hernan, the way I sell in countries other than mine when I travel or just sell to is to invoice them using an in country address. I’ve done some work in Italy and invoice them with a local return address ( luckily I know people who will forward the mail to me). Clients are far more likely to pay is you have a local address rather than as in my case Canada. If you don’t know anyone in the country, an email to your embassy there asking for some help works, or a forum such as this may get you someone who will let you use their address for your invoicing.

by . | 24 Oct 2007 01:10 | Victoria, Canada | | Report spam→
btw, nice blog shots Mustafah.

by . | 24 Oct 2007 02:10 | Victoria, Canada | | Report spam→
Mustafah

You have a point. But, as far as my claims, I can back them up with emails requesting payment and emails with discrepancies of claims of payments from Eyevine, Polaris and the Sunday Times. If someone makes a false claim, they run the risk of being liable for defamation or any other violation of law. That is their responsability, not mine. Everyone is responsable for each actions, including the agencies for not paying.

That does not mean that when we have a legitame claim or complaint we cannot inform it to other photographer so they don’t suffer the same consequences.

The fact is that I have not been paid for a job I did last December and I have the right to express my anger in a blog or website. I am not afraid to speak out when I have a legitimate claim backed with real facts. Everyone should do the same if it’s to protect us photographers from lousy paying clients. Today I help you, tomorrow you help me. Otherwise some agencies will continue with this conduct and we all loose. They dont !!!

I am going to give you and example…In Puerto Rico the press do not take crap from the police. Everytime someone is harrased by the police, each media outlet exposses them. Unlike NYC or Miami, where shooters are at the mercy of the police. This is an example:

On 10 February, during a FBI raid on an apartment building in the capital, San Juan, a group of around 20 journalists, who were covering the event, was showered with pepper gas and allegedly assaulted by FBI agents. The FBI raid on five homes and businesses was carried out to thwart an alleged “domestic terrorist attack” planned by a pro-independence group. An FBI spokesperson said the FBI agents had used “non-lethal force” to keep the media and protestors from crossing into a law enforcement perimeter. Reporters and media organisations condemned the actions of the FBI as abusive and a media freedom violation. Oscar J. Serrano, president of the Puerto Rico Journalists Association (ASSPRO) described the incident as “a wilful, unprecedented, criminal and vicious attack on people that were executing professionally the freedom of the press, a right that is guaranteed in the First Amendment of your (U.S.) Constitution and on the Bill of Rights of our Constitution”. The director of the U.S. National Association of Hispanic Journalists, Iván Román, said, “We are concerned that these violent tactics used against journalists in Puerto Rico serve as another example of increased hostilities by the federal government against the press.” In September, in a follow-up to the February incidents, ASSPRO, the American Civil Liberties Union, the Overseas Press Club, and six journalists announced that they had filed a civil lawsuit against the FBI in the U.S. District Court in San Juan. This unprecedented lawsuit seeks to compensate the journalists for the abuse they suffered and to order the FBI to establish a procedure to ensure that journalists are able to fulfil their duties.

We fight together and we win, the police here in Puerto Rico respect all media outlets. We do our job and we let them do theirs and we have no problems covering a story. No police tape or perimeters a mile away from the crime scene.

by Jose Jimenez-Tirado | 24 Oct 2007 05:10 | San Juan, United States | | Report spam→
F*#8# the clients, companies reputation etc, IF they don’t pay and have used your image, THEY are in breach of the copyright law, naming them will hopefully put them off, and more groups trying this well worn path.

CLEAR TERMS,SIGNED COPYRIGHT,AGREED DATE AND TERMS OF PAYMENT, OTHER WISE, no start the job and F*#*# OFF.

Really sick of photographers who lick back sides and contribute to others problems.

David I would suggest this post is expanded and kept going, this needs to be done MORE.

NAME AND SHAME.

by Tony Reddrop | 24 Oct 2007 10:10 | Melbourne, Australia | | Report spam→
Hi all, I am not usually one to participate in these forums but as a co-founder of one of the “named and shamed” companies (eyevine) and at the urging of our photographers I am posting some sort of defence. I’m not going to get into naming names as that would be unprofessional but will make a few observations that need to be said (apologies if this is all obvious);

1. A key role for us as an agent is to chase slow or bad payers on behalf of our photographers and agencies we represent. Some clients split and part pay invoices (esp. assignments where expenses are involved or where budgets are strained and they need to disguise jobs to get them through). The subsequent monthly remittance advice received from the client is often very long with hundreds of transactions with no reference / invoice numbers that we must marry up to our invoices to see which contributors to pay . It takes days, weeks and even months sometimes. The example mentioned earlier in this blog/string was paid by the client late in 2 installments over 3 months, we could not marry up all the information. We eventually matched these payments up and reported and PAID the due amount back to the correct supplier agency who should then pay their photographer. Yes it can be horrendously slow, yes it is frustrating for all concerned but without eyevine it would not have happened at all. With this example eyevine netted around £52 cut for our efforts – a loss. Despite it being dishonest why would we want to rip anyone off for such amounts?? We would love to get day rates up and be paid much faster by clients – but then wouldn’t everyone. The point is that if you choose name and shame make sure you get it right. One of the clients mentioned have owed us a large sum for over 12 months, they have been sold as an ongoing concern etc so many times that it will be impossible to collect any debt under UK law. We have to write the debt off.

2. At eyevine we pride ourselves on our integrity. Ask our photographers we work directly with. In the case of bad debt – don’t shoot the messenger – if we get paid you get paid and we all win. We are currently chasing debtors across the board for ourselves AND our contributors.

3. If anyone has any questions or issues they can always contact me directly at eyevine and I am happy to discuss specific issues further. I would prefer to do so on a more discreet and constructive basis than here.

Regards to all, and I hope that in these difficult times with editorial rates under pressure you are all flourishing.

by Graham Cross | 15 Nov 2007 16:11 (ed. Nov 15 2007) | London, United Kingdom | | Report spam→
Please use the Enter button, Graham.

Reading on a computer screen is very difficult for small text that has no breaks. Thanks…

by [former member] | 15 Nov 2007 16:11 | Philadelphia, United States | | Report spam→
Jose That is bullshit.

Ask Eyevine and Polaris for a sales record with your particular remittance highlighted. You will then be able to determine who is telling the truth.
I know several photographers who have had problems with Eyevine and Polaris.
Neither of these so called “Agents” give a damn about the photographers work they sell. I would advise you to work with another agent who you can trust.
WPN are also unreliable.

Ask the Sunday Times to provide you with the original remittance they sent to Eyevine. If you dig deep enough you will find out who’s not telling the truth and I very much doubt it is the Sunday Times!!

BTW I am under an Alias to protect ID.

Adios and Bon Chance!

by MimicMe | 15 Nov 2007 16:11 (ed. Nov 15 2007) | New York, United States | | Report spam→
I would be happy to supply anyone that uses a real name (that way I can trace them on our accounts system) the details of any payments we have received on their behalf. They just have to contact me directly and be who they say they are. Why not get in touch to get an answer rather than use a bulletin board incognito to complain? BTW I found the “enter” button Mustafah thanks for the tip.

by Graham Cross | 15 Nov 2007 16:11 | London, United Kingdom | | Report spam→
Guys I use Eyevine all the time & find them honest, polite and hard working – so I really don’t know where your coming from!

by Charlie Gray | 15 Nov 2007 17:11 | London, United Kingdom | | Report spam→
Graham if you read what I wrote carfully you will see that I said I know several photographers who have had dealings with your “agency” and were not jumping for joy.

Same with Polaris and WPN. I never said I have dealt with you directly.

What you fail to understand is that some photographers stick together and know who the rotten eggs are and I’m afraid your in the basket pal!

BTW it is my right to use an alias or any other form as I wish.

by MimicMe | 15 Nov 2007 17:11 | New York, United States | | Report spam→
This is ugly.

Anyway, in case Eyevine is interested,
Photohumorist.com

by Paul Treacy | 15 Nov 2007 17:11 | New York City, United States | | Report spam→
Hi “mysterious person”. No worries – I’m not going to lose sleep over weird slurs issued by someone who a) will bizarrely not reveal their identity (yes you have the right to remain anonymous if you wish) and b) we have not apparently worked with and so has no basis for 1st hand observations. To do so is to descend into absurdity so I will bow out of this stream as it’s not the right place for resolution. If anyone wants constructive dialogue and hopefully some answers to their questions that they think I may have then they know where to find me. I’m happy to help and won’t hide.

by Graham Cross | 15 Nov 2007 17:11 | London, United Kingdom | | Report spam→
paul – i’ll call you.

by Graham Cross | 15 Nov 2007 17:11 | London, United Kingdom | | Report spam→
Hey Jose there you go. Time to knock on the door and resolve the dispute.

To all photographers everywhere who have been shafted or treated badly-My the mysterious force be with you.

Just don’t take any shit from these so called agents.

Over and out from the mysterious one.

by MimicMe | 15 Nov 2007 17:11 | New York, United States | | Report spam→
Hey Kids – if you want to get on in the world of photography don’t take these bunch of clowns as your role models!

Guys wash your dirty washing in private, do you think Martin Parr or Don McCullin would behave like this?

by Charlie Gray | 15 Nov 2007 18:11 | London, United Kingdom | | Report spam→
Who are you anyway Charlie Gray?

You give advice when your not that hot a photographer yourself.

If I was to reveal my identity you would be surprised. I have been in this game a very long time. I choose to keep my identity private so I can rat out these so called agents who proclaim this and that and I have had many photographers tell me about the unscrupulous activities of Polaris and Eyevine selling images as low as $40 but say it’s still a sale. If the photographers and their images were respected no decent agency would sell their images for this price.
I know of only 3 or 4 decent agents left that do not form partnerships and flood their databases with mediocre imagery and will never need to.

Good photographers get to work with good agents not these so called agencies who are always after a quick buck.

Do yourself a favour and get to work making more interesting images and get a decent agent.

by MimicMe | 15 Nov 2007 19:11 | New York, United States | | Report spam→
I have several top agencies interested in me at the moment so your pathetic opinion really doesn’t hold much water old mate, if your such a hot shot you would put your name on and stop being a pussy! I want to make clear I wasn’t referring to anyone being a bad photographer i was just stating that this isn’t the way to conduct one’s self in a very fickle industry…

by Charlie Gray | 15 Nov 2007 19:11 | London, United Kingdom | | Report spam→
I have a clause in my contracts - No copyright rights are granted/assigned until invoice/fees are paid..

If the client does not pay within the agreed time frame.. AND they have gone to press with images
then instead of small claims court I can file a copyright infringement suit and go for 6-8x the invoiced amount.. (USA scenario)

I had a client that I had at 120days past due – All I had to do was threaten them (politely) in a letter – if invoice is not paid by (7 days later) then the following week I would go to court and request a lien on their building for 6x the invoiced fee (explaining the clear cut copyright violation) or (USD $30,000) _ I had my check for the invoiced amount in 4 days.. and of course they will never hire me back, but then again I did not want to work for them either..

Learn your copyright rights and how that relates to contract law in your country, and make your agreements and contracts reflect this.. It is a subtle clause but has huge ramifications if you are not paid. Most clients do not even question the clause in MY FINE PRINT.

by [former member] | 15 Nov 2007 19:11 | Charlottesville, Virginia, United States | | Report spam→
Thats the way to do Business!

by Charlie Gray | 15 Nov 2007 19:11 | London, United Kingdom | | Report spam→
Hey please, don´t go out of the topic

by Hernan Zenteno | 15 Nov 2007 20:11 | Buenos Aires, Argentina | | Report spam→
Ja, ja, ja, ja. George, you are really very funny. You can imagine what do some clients with the contract. So, thanks for the advice but i prefer to know who are hard to pay. This post can´t damage you professional practices. So please, don´t go out of the topic. Saludos

by Hernan Zenteno | 15 Nov 2007 20:11 | Buenos Aires, Argentina | | Report spam→
Hernan – you sound like someone who is spoiling for a fight, take George Brown’s advice – he’s a cool dude!

by Charlie Gray | 15 Nov 2007 20:11 | London, United Kingdom | | Report spam→
Again, don´t know Why you are hacking this post. You can talk about legal practices with home in UK and USA. But I live in Argentine. For example, I have a contract with a French client. They don´t pay. Talk me all the rules now. How Can I pay a lawyer for this overseas mistake. I prefer to know Who are hard to pay. Is so simple. Call me not professional, i don´t care, I have to do my own way to sell, the world is not equal for all. Charlie, I don´t like fight. I don´t like go out of topic. So act as tolerant people. Saludos

by Hernan Zenteno | 15 Nov 2007 21:11 | Buenos Aires, Argentina | | Report spam→
Jon Golden,

“No copyright rights are granted/assigned until invoice/fees are paid.”

That’s brilliant mate!

I would have though that running the image and then non payment would be copyright infringement any way.

Any way it’s brilliant and I am tacking it to my contracts from now on.

Hernan,

In France, the photographer owns all copyright to his images. End of story. Try to get help with any journalist union over there see if they can help. Most publications want contracts that are governed by their local contry’s laws. So you have the advantage.

TS

by Tomas Stargardter | 16 Nov 2007 00:11 | Managua, Nicaragua | | Report spam→
The fact of the matter is that I still have not been paid. Either by Polaris or Eyevine. My record shows that Polaris has always paid my jobs (some late, others not). Polaris has always stated that Eyevine has not paid their invoice.

I live by the fact that ACTIONS ALWAYS SPEAK LOUDERS THAN WORDS.

As long as Eyevine doesn’t provide me with a cancelled check that they paid Polaris I will continue to claim they are full of crap. In the event they do, Polaris will fall under the Guinness Record of NonPayers Company and FULL OF CRAP. It’s very simple, show me the evidene and I will the first one to say I was mistaken regarding Eyevine.

After 11 months of non-payment, I can say I tried to wash this laundry in private. I have no more patience!!!! Nobody should.

Contract or no contract, we are in the business of providing images and getting paid when we do our job right. Fortunately, I have a nice record so far. You can ask around. I am not perfect, but I don’t take shit when I don’t get paid.

It is time that we all stick together and burn every agency or client that do not pay. What is wrong should not be questioned. For the same reason, if I make mistakes I have no problem being blamed or burnt. I usually take a deep breath and make sure I learn from it.

by Jose Jimenez-Tirado | 16 Nov 2007 01:11 (ed. Nov 16 2007) | San Juan, United States | | Report spam→
Charlie Gray

I have no reason to doubt that Eyevine has been good to you. Maybe is because you’re in London and you can walk, knock on their door and harrass them until you get paid. But not me, thousands of miles across the Atlantic. You can be sure I have none of these problems here in Puerto Rico!!!!!

Believe me, I am the type of person that knows that fact the agencies depend on us as much as we depend on them. I have been on both sides of the coin.

I just want to get paid for a superb service I provided. Until them, screw anyone that do not pay. I did not give Eyevine a single excuse or explanation. I provided the images they requested in the exact time frame they requested. I completed my end of the bargain, they have obviously not.

Like we say here in Puerto Rico, “EL RESTO ES SALIVA o PURA MIERDA. NO ES CUESTION DE TAMAñO, ES CUESTION DE BOLAS

by Jose Jimenez-Tirado | 16 Nov 2007 02:11 (ed. Nov 16 2007) | San Juan, United States | | Report spam→
yes, it is very sad, and patience can run out if despite several emails, appeals, inquiry, we don’t get paid on time..i have the same experience, one year, of not getting paid. i think my agency forgot to remit the money, or perhaps the magazine really did not pay up on time. But still my patience stretched. Now i am experiencing the same thing, 6 to 9 mos to wait, i was told.

But this does not happen all the time. I have put things in perspective. i make an appeal, people who could somehow help in giving me sound advice and could actually make things get moving so i get paid. While waiting, I seek out other assignments to do. I know its hard, unless we experience it, we dont have any idea what it is to go thru being not paid, meanwhile bills are piling up.

but its good we have a forum like this to seek out ideas and get advice.

nana

by nana buxani | 16 Nov 2007 02:11 | Quezon city, Metro Manila, Philippines | | Report spam→
This is exactly why this forum works. Wether we agree or not… issues that affect our photojournalism industry are being addressed and discussed….

by Jose Jimenez-Tirado | 16 Nov 2007 03:11 | San Juan, United States | | Report spam→
It’s funny that we all have participated in a story where someone is being placed in national or world spotlight…

And still some of us say the our dirty laundry must be washed in private…

We can print and burn anyone, yet we’re afraid to do it within our industry???

THAT IS THE BIGGEST CRAP I HAVE READ SO FAR !!!!!

by Jose Jimenez-Tirado | 16 Nov 2007 03:11 | San Juan, United States | | Report spam→
George:

May I remind you that a piece of paper will hold anything you write on it…

I am in the business of providing a service and getting paid… I am not in the business of collecting bad debts….

I respect your way of doing business and your point of view, although I strongly disagree because the fact of the matter is that a contract will resolve all your collection problems… Otherwise we wouldn’t be discussing this issue…Life is not that simple…

by Jose Jimenez-Tirado | 16 Nov 2007 03:11 | San Juan, United States | | Report spam→
George:

It says you’re a commercial photographer, not a photojournalist. You have time to sign contracts, which is great. I was called to do this job, to find a location that was unknown and transmit the images ASAP. All within an hour or two. I had no time for contracts. I had time to provide a service for which I expected to get paid. Do you think I knew that a job from the London Times was going to give me all this collection problems. Sometimes you have to expect that the people you work with are serious professionals. I guess I was wrong !!!!

You look at my work and you tell me if I am not a professional… www.josejimeneztirado.com

Just because I don’t do business like you, which I stated I respect, that doesn’t mean I am not a professional. To me you’re are just another wise guy who thinks is right about everything and there is just one way in life , your way. I still wish you the best in life !!!!!

by Jose Jimenez-Tirado | 16 Nov 2007 13:11 (ed. Nov 16 2007) | San Juan, United States | | Report spam→
I don’t care whether you are a commercial photographer, a photojournalist, or some amateur with a camera. If you sell your work and your services it behooves you to have a standard agreement that defines usage rights being granted, payment/fees expected and terms.

It can be a simple form, a single page document that you modify each time with the usage rights you have discussed, fill in the fee you have discussed, and it already has the terms YOU expect or were discussed – save it and enclose it with the package of your images that you are uploading on a tight deadline.

It took me longer to compose and write this email then it would have to modify and email an existing standard agreement.

While I agree that having a contract does not mean you will not have a collection problem. Not having one increases your problems. Being a professional is more than making great photos.. You can make the greatest photos in the world but if you can’t balance your checkbook you will eventually be out of business.

Work on your business practices with the same effort you put into researching your story ideas.

by [former member] | 16 Nov 2007 20:11 | Charlottesville, Virginia, United States | | Report spam→
Jon and George

Have a nice life !!!!

by Jose Jimenez-Tirado | 17 Nov 2007 00:11 | San Juan, United States | | Report spam→
An anonymous troll wrote:

“Graham if you read what I wrote carfully you will see that I said I know several photographers who have had dealings with your “agency” and were not jumping for joy.
Same with Polaris and WPN. I never said I have dealt with you directly.

What you fail to understand is that some photographers stick together and know who the rotten eggs are and I’m afraid your in the basket pal!

BTW it is my right to use an alias or any other form as I wish."

It’s also your right to make a public idiot of yourself, which may be why you prefer to remain anonymous. Honestly, some twat signs up under a false name, claims to be a big-shot, and immediately starts slandering people who were working in this business when you were still in diapers: that’s if you’re actually out of them. Unlike you I’ve ben repped by Polaris and Eyevine for several years and I fail to detect the rotten egg smell you do.

Never mind the fact that you can’t even post under your real name: just produce some evidence. Anything at all. You know, the way professional journalists do.

And while youre feeling helpful, since you know of the “only 3 or 4” agents who are any good, could you please let the rest of us know who they are? I’m assuming that with your background you do regular business with these people and will be happy to both vouch for and promote them.

by Jeremy Nicholl | 17 Nov 2007 18:11 | Moscow, Russia | | Report spam→
An anonymous troll wrote:

“Graham if you read what I wrote carfully you will see that I said I know several photographers who have had dealings with your “agency” and were not jumping for joy.
Same with Polaris and WPN. I never said I have dealt with you directly.

What you fail to understand is that some photographers stick together and know who the rotten eggs are and I’m afraid your in the basket pal!

BTW it is my right to use an alias or any other form as I wish."

It’s also your right to make a public idiot of yourself, which may be why you prefer to remain anonymous. Honestly, some twat signs up under a false name, claims to be a big-shot, and immediately starts slandering people who were working in this business when you were still in diapers: that’s if you’re actually out of them. Unlike you I’ve ben repped by Polaris and Eyevine for several years and I fail to detect the rotten egg smell you do.

Never mind the fact that you can’t even post under your real name: just produce some evidence. Anything at all. You know, the way professional journalists do.

And while youre feeling helpful, since you know of the “only 3 or 4” agents who are any good, could you please let the rest of us know who they are? I’m assuming that with your background you do regular business with these people and will be happy to both vouch for and promote them.

by Jeremy Nicholl | 17 Nov 2007 18:11 | Moscow, Russia | | Report spam→
You can insult me all you want Mr Nichol and Charlie Gray.

I may in both your opinions be a troll and stupid but the proof is in the pudding..Jose has not been paid.
I was interested in this post because I know several photographers who had similar problems with Polaris, Eyevine and WPN. For fairness I should include Zuma, Sipa and a few others who are not worth mentioning because they are no longer in business.

Your trying to defend the indefensible, and if your happy to scratch a living from an agent selling your work on occasions for less than $50 than good luck to you.

Although the cost of living in Moscow cannot really be compared to NY or London so maybe you can afford for your images to be sold for a pittance.

by MimicMe | 17 Nov 2007 19:11 | New York, United States | | Report spam→
Clearly you neither travel much nor keep track of world affairs, or you’d know that the cost of living in Moscow is rather more expensive than that of NY, and even exceeds London in some aspects. Incidentally I also have a residence in the UK, so I certainly can’t afford to sell my work for a pittance.

But enough about me, what about you? Tell us all about your 3 or 4 favoured agents. I’m sure we’d all like to know who they are: after all, you do want to help, don’t you? And how about some work samples? Like you say, you’ve been in the game a long time, so you must have some pretty impressive material to show.

by Jeremy Nicholl | 17 Nov 2007 19:11 | Moscow, Russia | | Report spam→
You assume I am a photographer. You assume wrong.

And yes I do have “issues” I have “issues” with so called agents who do not pay photographers who do what is required of them and get let down when it comes to getting paid. Simple.

Yes Mr Nicholl I do travel regularly and was recently in Moscow. It was no where near as expensive as NY and considerably cheaper than London.

by MimicMe | 17 Nov 2007 20:11 | New York, United States | | Report spam→
This guy has been around longer than most of us and has no problems with naming names albeit, a slightly different circumstance, than what has been discussed here. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mj5IV23g-fE
Cheers,

by Allen Quinn | 17 Nov 2007 21:11 | houston, United States | | Report spam→
I am grateful to my professional colleagues, who have alerted us out of the goodness of their hearts, to avoid specific unpaying clients, so that we do not befall the same frustrations and sense of exploitation that they did. Thank you all. As for those who feel they have some strange moral authority to label them as unprofessional, I would suggest you offer some practical advice rather than your nonsensical condemnations and inference of your higher ethics, superior morality and professionalism.

by Russell Gordon | 17 Nov 2007 21:11 | Belgrade, Serbia | | Report spam→
Sorry I originally spelt Absolutely wrong. Corrected before any of the disgruntled ones can castigate me for my spelling.

Thank you Allen

Absolutely god damn fucking right!

Jose please let us know if you do ever manage to get paid by these “make a quick buck” cretins.

George calm down. Go for a jog, roller blade for a few hours or just chill out.

by MimicMe | 17 Nov 2007 22:11 | New York, United States | | Report spam→
Knock it off!

by Paul Treacy | 18 Nov 2007 00:11 | New York City, United States | | Report spam→
MimicMe bragged:
“I have been in this game a very long time.”

But later forgot to take his pills and confessed:
“You assume I am a photographer. You assume wrong.”

Well I’m glad we got that straightened out. Note to MimicMe: when constructing a fantasy life remember to join the dots up. It will help your credibility no end.

“Yes Mr Nicholl I do travel regularly and was recently in Moscow. It was nowhere near as expensive as NY and considerably cheaper than London.”

Whoops, wrong again:
http://money.cnn.com/2007/06/15/pf/most_expensive_cities/

Perhaps you were in Moscow Tennessee?

by Jeremy Nicholl | 18 Nov 2007 13:11 | Moscow, Russia | | Report spam→
What we need it to buy space int DRR and start our gig. Screw the middlemen.

TS

by Tomas Stargardter | 18 Nov 2007 19:11 (ed. Nov 18 2007) | Managua, Nicaragua | | Report spam→
I don’t really care if you think I am credible or not. The fact remains that these so called agents are not paying some of their contributors.
I ventured into this post to support what Jose was saying.

Jeremy you really must refrain from getting involved in petty disputes on an open forum. Any decent photographer worth his salt should know that.

And Jon it is highly unlikely you will get any form of representation if you behave the way you have on this post. Your a disgrace.

by MimicMe | 18 Nov 2007 19:11 | New York, United States | | Report spam→
Ummm, right.

Anyway.. had an experience with an EXCELLENT payer this week.

Anyway.. had an experience with an EXCELLENT payer this week.My invoice arrived in their office on the Wednesday 7 November, the cheque was dated Friday 9 November, and it was in my letter box on the Monday. Can’t ask for much more than that?

Anyway.. had an experience with an EXCELLENT payer this week.My invoice arrived in their office on the Wednesday 7 November, the cheque was dated Friday 9 November, and it was in my letter box on the Monday. Can’t ask for much more than that?Small to medium sized businesses are the key.. where the person who receives the mail is also the person who prints the cheques and gets the boss the sign them, and takes the mail to the mailbox too.. It’s the big businesses that have mail rooms, and three layers of payment approval, and inboxes that get neglected, and one person in the process on leave, and monthly accounts-payable-cycles, etc, etc, etc … these things are probably more likely to be a problem than malicious attitudes. Not that any of that matters to your bank manager.

by Wade Laube | 18 Nov 2007 20:11 | London, United Kingdom | | Report spam→
How feasible do you reckon it could be to use your DRR or PS account for smaller clients.. shoot the job and deliver it via the e-commerce feature of either of those platforms? So they’re paying up before they get the goods.

by Wade Laube | 18 Nov 2007 21:11 | London, United Kingdom | | Report spam→
Who ya Gonna Call ? Not ‘MimicMe’ as he doesn’t have a portfolio & is taking photos on his Mums box Brownie!

by Charlie Gray | 18 Nov 2007 22:11 (ed. Nov 18 2007) | London, United Kingdom | | Report spam→
IT is my firm belief that we have the means to take over our busisness ourselves.
DRR and PS are the tools of liberation.

They are the swords that will kill the Gettys and such parsites, since we as photojouralists, photographers, comercial photographers, all of us…

I believe that even AP and Reuters would tremble.

TS

by Tomas Stargardter | 19 Nov 2007 03:11 | Managua, Nicaragua | | Report spam→
Charlie and George(now that sounds like a really useless partnership)

I would offer you the same advice as I offered Jeremy, you really must refrain from getting involved in petty disputes on an open forum. Now thats Unprofessional.

I’m OK as I have used an alias and so therefore exempt from doing myself any harm.

I suggest you bear that in mind.

by MimicMe | 19 Nov 2007 12:11 | New York, United States | | Report spam→
Gentlemen:

I want to inform everyone that finally my check has been mailed and is on it’s way to Puerto Rico. Days ago I was given proper information that shows Eyevine had paid Polaris a long time ago. I guess this time and for this particular job, Polaris falls under the Guiness Record of NonPayment Companies…Yet, like I said before, they have always paid my invoices, some early and some late.

The important issue here is that none of us should have to wait 11 months to get paid. Much less when I delivered my professional services within the time frame requested by Polaris, Eyevine or the Sunday Times.

We photographers MUST always deliver in time without excuses. That is our duty!!!! For the same reason, everyone must to be paid in due time, regardless if they have contracts or not.

Let’s keep this issue open until it’s resolved or improves for the benefit of everyone, not just me !!!

by Jose Jimenez-Tirado | 19 Nov 2007 18:11 | San Juan, United States | | Report spam→
Your duty Jose is to write a full apology on this site to Graham Cross & David Leverton who have worked so very hard to build up an excellent reputation with their company Eyevine!

by Charlie Gray | 19 Nov 2007 18:11 | London, United Kingdom | | Report spam→
Charlie:

I don’t have to apologize to anyone. I asked for this information a long time ago and did not get real facts until this week after this issue was posted here.

Eyevine and I have settled our differences and at least I moved on. I cleared them and posted the correct facts.

by Jose Jimenez-Tirado | 19 Nov 2007 19:11 (ed. Nov 19 2007) | San Juan, United States | | Report spam→
Congratulations Jose.

I suspect it was because you kicked up a fuss on this forum and the people involved in not paying you got a little worried that there “good name” did not get tarnished.

Well the truth is out there Scully, you just have to find it.

George that picture is too “Funky” for me. It looks like a self portrait!

by MimicMe | 19 Nov 2007 21:11 | New York, United States | | Report spam→
Well, that took this whole forum to a new low…perhaps we should have a hall of fame for the worse use of both the English and Spanish language.

Seriously, folks, I this is my last post to LS…far too many hacks trolling around.

Here is how you fix your payment issues…get a lawyer and enforce your contracts, libelous chit-chat is unprofessional, not to mention a very dangerous practice, as well as idle threats.

This thread is a shining example of the kind of tripe that has made lightstalkers another cesspool for the interweb.

Signing off…MWS.

by [former member] | 19 Nov 2007 23:11 (ed. Nov 19 2007) | Austin, Texas, United States | | Report spam→
I never insulted anyone until this George jerk pulled this stunt…..

Like I said, he’s way out of line…once he reads what I think of him in Spanish and English, I will delete it….

by Jose Jimenez-Tirado | 20 Nov 2007 00:11 | San Juan, United States | | Report spam→
George:

You simply don’t read… For the last 11 months I have been asking Eyevine and Polaris for precise information about why I have not been paid. Just yesterday I got the right information from Eyevine and I then corrected the facts in this forum. I made my peace with Eyevine !!!!

Until yesterday, everyones actions spoke louder that their words…No evidence of payment.

I got what I needed, my check is on the mail. I guess I was right about posting my problem !!!

Have a nice life, I will not waste my time with you or Charlie Gray for the same reason…

Nos vemos pa.. !!!!

by Jose Jimenez-Tirado | 20 Nov 2007 02:11 (ed. Nov 20 2007) | San Juan, United States | | Report spam→
Jose – your foul mouthed, violent & homophobic tirade (that you then deleated) has shocked & saddened me!

by Charlie Gray | 20 Nov 2007 10:11 | London, United Kingdom | | Report spam→
Charlie:

The first one that went out of line was George when he posted that image claiming it looked like me. I was never disrespectful to anyone in this forum.

I am certainly not a homofobic since I have many gay friends whom I value. I can get foul mouthed when someone insults me. If you’re saddened and shock, I guess it never went through your mind that people react to insults in different ways.

Like I said, have a nice life. After 11 months, finally my check is on the mail. I guess I did something right.

by Jose Jimenez-Tirado | 20 Nov 2007 14:11 | San Juan, United States | | Report spam→
Felicidades Jose!!! this is the power of an open forum like that, a sort of an open and public trial, and you can save money of lawyer too; there is no shame to outspeak publicly when one is on the right side: what was due had to be due. punto. no pasarán!!! saludos :))

by Dana De Luca | 20 Nov 2007 18:11 | Milan, Italy | | Report spam→
I hope everyone understands where I am coming from…

What’s good for me, is good for everyone out there… If we stick together, we can achive a lot for OUR benefit !!! We deserve to get paid for the same reason the clients deserve good images in due time for publication. Why shouldn’t it work !!!

Gracias por tu mensaje…

by Jose Jimenez-Tirado | 20 Nov 2007 19:11 | San Juan, United States | | Report spam→
Hey, I begin to worry about Eyedea of France. I am writing several emails without replies, I sign a contract, i give them the pix near two month ago. The deal was that i will have the money in 15 days but i have no contact since last 31 of october. I ask if are there some problem because i know some big enterprises have a lot of burocracy but the silence begin to beat my head. I included the ten per cent charge for delays. Hope have news next days. I read that Eyedea was hard to pay in other issues but I think that the contract and compromise by email was something. Hope I am not wrong.

by Hernan Zenteno | 20 Nov 2007 21:11 | Buenos Aires, Argentina | | Report spam→
go figure, it takes a writer to say it perfectly. i can’t say it better, after running a commercial studio for 25 years… here you go:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mj5IV23g-fE

by [former member] | 21 Nov 2007 14:11 | boston, ma, United States | | Report spam→
That is a fantastic video and he’s right on the money (pardon the pun).

by Wade Laube | 21 Nov 2007 17:11 | Copenhagen, Denmark | | Report spam→
I had a few old timers that tells me not to bad mouth you old employer or your client, this being such a small community and all. Every time I heard that, it saddens me to hear that of all professions, it is a journalist that cannot honestly say what he wanted to say, or to tell the truth.

The practice put into question of all the praises that I heard from people about this newspaper or that publication…

So, No… I don’t agree when someone says it’s unprofessional to name company that do not pay. I think this info needs to get out there, I thought the whole idea about journalism is transparency and truth….

by FANG LIANG | 25 Nov 2007 23:11 | san francisco, ca, United States | | Report spam→
St. Louis Post Dispatch. Over 2 years now and still no pay. I was hired on via Lee Publications because I work for the sister paper in San Diego (North County Times)to help cover the MLB ALCS Playoffs between the san Diego Padres and the St Louis Cardinals. I’ve tried everything short of flying there and confronting the editor to get my pay but, at this point I’m fairly certain I can count it as a right off. You would think a big company like Lee Pubs would pay their employees, both fulltime and stringers. I can’t bitch too much I did get to see a playoff game on the field. Not that I can pay my mortgage with visuals from the game but, it was a great game.

Nick M

by Nick Morris | 30 Nov 2007 01:11 | new york, United States | | Report spam→
Last November (2006) I was engaged by a transport company to supply images for a ‘guide to the city bus routes’. The sheer volume of my images included in the published guide far out-strips those of their staff photographer. Phone calls, emails and even personal visits to the communications office shone not a beam of light on the subject. Promised of returned phone calls etc are simply vague attempts to shake me off.

… and I’m not someone to let sleeping dogs lie.

by Stuart McAlister | 30 Nov 2007 07:11 | Paris, France | | Report spam→
shot a package of 300 images for a candle manufactuere out of los angeles.. 2.5 months with the minimum of 35 phone calls. on a return trip to LA i parked my car behind the marketing directors car and waited for him to get off work.

it was quite an exchange, and he crawled back to accounting with his tail between his legs.

by Matthew Craig | 04 Dec 2007 20:12 | Boston, Ma, United States | | Report spam→

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Participants

David Coll Blanco, Photographer David Coll Blanco
Photographer
Tokyo , Japan
Hernan Zenteno, Photographer Hernan Zenteno
Photographer
Buenos Aires , Argentina ( EZE )
Massimo Pizzocaro, Photographer Massimo Pizzocaro
Photographer
Athens , Greece
Tomoko Yamamoto, Multimedia Artist Tomoko Yamamoto
Multimedia Artist
Vienna , Austria ( VIE )
Con O'Donoghue, Photographer Con O'Donoghue
Photographer
Dublin , Ireland
Dean C.K. Cox, Photojournalist Dean C.K. Cox
Photojournalist
Hong Kong , Hong Kong
Gina van Hoof, photographer Gina van Hoof
photographer
Brussels , Belgium ( BRU )
Tomas Stargardter, Photojournalist Tomas Stargardter
Photojournalist
(Photo Editor at LA PRENSA)
Managua , Nicaragua ( MGA )
Charlie Gray, Professional Photographer Charlie Gray
Professional Photographer
London , United Kingdom
Michael Bowring, photographer Michael Bowring
photographer
Belgrade , Serbia
Paul  Treacy, Photographer Paul Treacy
Photographer
(Photohumourist)
London , United Kingdom ( LGW )
., .
Victoria , Canada ( YYJ )
Jose Jimenez-Tirado, Photojournalist Jose Jimenez-Tirado
Photojournalist
San Juan , Puerto Rico
Chico Sanchez, Photographer Chico Sanchez
Photographer
Mexico City , Mexico
Bastian Ehl, Fotograf / Photographer Bastian Ehl
Fotograf / Photographer
Magdeburg , Germany
Bill Thomas, Photographer-Videographer Bill Thomas
Photographer-Videographer
Nyc , United States
Tony Reddrop, Photographer Tony Reddrop
Photographer
New Zealand , New Zealand
Graham Cross, Co-owner of Photo Agency Graham Cross
Co-owner of Photo Agency
London , United Kingdom
MimicMe, MimicMe
New York , United States
nana buxani, Photographer, Filmmaker nana buxani
Photographer, Filmmaker
(freelance documentary photogra)
Manila , Philippines
Jeremy Nicholl, Photographer Jeremy Nicholl
Photographer
Moscow , Russia
Allen Quinn, Dreamer...fortune hunter Allen Quinn
Dreamer...fortune hunter
("Count to five and duck...")
Houston , United States
Russell Gordon, Journalist, Photographer Russell Gordon
Journalist, Photographer
(http://www.russellgordon.net)
Belgrade , Serbia
Wade Laube, Photographer Wade Laube
Photographer
Sydney , Australia
Dana De Luca, Photographer Dana De Luca
Photographer
Milan , Italy
FANG LIANG, Photographer FANG LIANG
Photographer
Chengdu , China
Nick Morris, Photojournalist/Photograp Nick Morris
Photojournalist/Photograp
(The Image Group Photography)
San Diego Ca , United States
Stuart McAlister, 360° Photographer Stuart McAlister
360° Photographer
Paris , France ( CDG )
Matthew Craig, Photographer/Producer Matthew Craig
Photographer/Producer
New York City , United States


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