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How much to charge NGOs?

A small faith-based NGO recently approached me, requesting that I complete a photo essay on poverty in village in Mexico to help raise money for their foundation. I have worked with NGOs in the past, but often it has been for free with expenses covered.

I’d like advice on how much I should charge this NGO, as they are willing to provide a rate and cover expenses. The photos will be used to promote their foundation in a traveling exhibition in print and multimedia form to create awareness and raise money.

Normally a project like this (in my opinion) could take years to complete. But I’m thinking if I’m shooting consistently, two weeks is enough to spend? What should I charge for a day rate? And post production, esp if I have to print the images, will also be time-consuming… so that needs to be in the budget as well.

Any thoughts?? Thanks!!! Erin

by [a former member] at 2010-06-10 00:50:34 UTC | Bookmark | | Report spam→

i would think a week would be what they would expect (yes i know what you mean) ask about usd300-400 a day i would expect them to be happy with just pics on a cd-rom. ask them to cover costs but be happy to stay at staff housing while there…

ps you own copyright on images and so you could expect some stock sales later depending on the content of the images.

j.

by John Robinson | 10 Jun 2010 05:06 | Durban, South Africa | | Report spam→
I would suggest that you break this down into two sections- your shooting and your post production. On the shoot, it might make sense to charge a project fee based on your time and what you feel you need to make it worthwhile- Location work is often full of surprises, and locking in to a day rate can sometime be awkward. You might fall right into high gear and breeze through in four days or you may get hit by three days of rain or community conflict, or waiting for access and need much more time- In either case it can get complicated to negotiate these from the field. A flat shooting fee covers you in either eventuality and is often easier for an NGO to understand. 300- 400 for day rate is certainly on the low end of the scale, but as part of a 10 or 14 day package plus post production fees, may give you enough of a fee to make it work. It also sends a positive message that you are serious about what you do.

by richard sobol | 10 Jun 2010 13:06 | | Report spam→
Two valuable comments here above.

For the post production you should calculate that in ‘days’ and fix a rate on that. Sadly you only know that after the shooting mostly. You might need more days but it is better to work with days as a unit to get paid for.

NGO’s I worked with usually give some days (hmmm mostly one or two) for the post production on CD and the rate is the same as a shooting day. That might be than your next question…but 400 is than the least to aim at for the post production days.

by Tom Van Cakenberghe | 10 Jun 2010 14:06 | Kathmandu, Nepal | | Report spam→
All great tips, thanks!!!

I think I can cut it down to 10 days… maybe a week if there are some amazing moments. And then maybe a flat rate for post production, as well… I’m thinking a flat fee of $5,000 for shooting for 10 days and a flat fee of $1,000 for post production. $6,000 is low for that much time, but it’s also for a good cause (building houses for people in Mexico who live in card board boxes), so I am trying not to charge too much… the NGO is small and doesn’t have a huge budget… as is the case with most NGO’s :)

Thanks again!

by [former member] | 10 Jun 2010 19:06 | New York City, United States | | Report spam→
You are right Will, doing God’s job is precious!

by Tom Van Cakenberghe | 11 Jun 2010 14:06 | Kathmandu, Nepal | | Report spam→
I’d like to give a slightly different perspective. $5000 for 10 days work on an interesting, probably fun shoot with minimal prep and set up. Assume there are 30 10-day blocks in a year (leaving 65 days for weekends and vacations). $5000 × 30 = $150k yearly salary. Not bad for NGO work. Don’t worry about “sending messages” about being serious. The fact that as an NGO they are willing pay you a halfway decent wage means they take you seriously. Enjoy the shoot.

by Allen Craig Schlossman | 19 Jun 2010 05:06 | | Report spam→
While not answering your question directly, this may be an interesting read:

http://photobusinessforum.blogspot.com/2009/10/ngo-mystique.html

by [former member] | 19 Jun 2010 14:06 | | Report spam→
I’ve done a few projects for non-profits, usually portraits with some quotes from the subject. The concept is always to help define the organization which is usually more complex than the public’s perception. The magic number for me has been $4000. That covers about 20 portraits. If its set-up well, I can do 3-4 portraits a day, which usually involve home visits with an hour or so spent with each subject. This includes my post production and delivery on DVD. Non-profits are usually tight on money and appreciate a fixed bottom line. I customize releases to be limited to the usages of that particular non-profit agency. I don’t think its ethical to use those photographs in a completely different context later, unless I backtrack for new permission. I wouldn’t sign a generic model’s release so I don’t ask the subject to do that.

by Joel Sackett | 19 Jun 2010 15:06 | Puget Sound, Washington, United States | | Report spam→
Joel and Allen…Do the figures you quoted include expenses such as air fares, car rentals, taxis, food, hotels, a needed assistant, or special equipment? OR…are all these people in the same general area? If you fail to include your logistical expenses then your profit margin gets smaller and smaller…even before the IRS gets their cut. Just curious. G.

by Gregory Sharko | 19 Jun 2010 22:06 | Brooklyn, New York, United States | | Report spam→
MY figures don’t include any costs. But again, it’s a non profit and the on-location type of shots they want usually don’t require an assistant because you don’t usually use lighting setups other than an external flash. Anyone can hold that for you or you use a tri pod. If you believe in the cause, you also don’t charge for food, because you eat three meals a day anyway, no? Does your office job buy you food? And taking a taxi to a location isn’t much of a logistical expense. Again, these are not ad agency shoots and most good (documentary) photographers can get great shots with a minimal amount of fuss and expenses. I want to emphasize again that this is an NGO project which, if we decide to take on, we treat different than an on-location shoot for the Gap, which is obviously a more pampered set-up. That’s just how I approach it.

by Allen Craig Schlossman | 19 Jun 2010 22:06 | | Report spam→
Yes, important question. The projects I referred to are all local. It takes me less than 15 minutes to drive to any location within this small community. Having said that I do charge for gas but not meals. And I don’t charge extra for one or two meetings with the client and the designer. I agree with Allen that if this was a corporate client, with the same type of assignment, its full day rates, assistant, post-production fees, travel days, and separate expenses. Years ago, I asked a senior Magnum member how the agency figures out what to charge for corporate work? “Think of a fair price, then double it.” I wish.

by Joel Sackett | 20 Jun 2010 01:06 | Puget Sound, Washington, United States | | Report spam→
Ahhh! Thanks Joel and Allen. It’s the little things that keep you in business. Yes your life as a photog is also a business just as HGOs are also in business.

by Gregory Sharko | 20 Jun 2010 01:06 (ed. Jun 20 2010) | Brooklyn, New York, United States | | Report spam→
One of the difference between NGO’s and corporates are that the people of the NGO’s usually help you out locally with transport, an assistant (not always a good one) and food and lodging if you are away from your own place. Corporates pay you to organize logistics. So you can charge an NGO a bit less for that reason.

The bottom line is that they need good images that they will use in their communication to donors. Therefore the images help them to get future funds. Why should you charge so-much-less? You are a hired professional and not a volunteer.

Last week again I got an offer: I had to work for a Nepali salary, duh? What is a Nepali salary? Half a dollar an hour or so?

So they didn’t like my price that I put at 300 bucks for a half day (which will not be half day anyway, rather a whole day but starting from noon) and the deal bounced.

Probably not a very professional NGO after all.

Serious NGO’s and other non profits who hire photographers have these things organized and have rates at the ready.

Non profit doesn’t mean the staff and free lancers are paid badly…it just means they don’t operate to make more money than they need (or pay stock holders). They are not into it for ‘profit’ and if they have profit they have to re-invest, hence they don’t pay taxes on the re-invested profit.

And Allen your calculation doesn’t make any sense if you include all days scratching your balls in between assignments. That is reality for me and many others. And these days become weeks easily nowadays. And I am not suggesting that these days should be a reason to charge higher, just charge decent for a job well done.

Erin, I suggest your stick to your rates as you mentioned above, and tell them you are willing to negotiate. And if they come up with good arguments you can go down. Standard market procedure that is.

Hope you get/do the job!!!

Cheers
Tom

by Tom Van Cakenberghe | 20 Jun 2010 16:06 | Kathmandu, Nepal | | Report spam→
NGOs mainly rely on gouvernement subsidies and private funds. They run on a very strict budget. That’s why they hired lot of volunteers and I can understand they don’t have the money to pay a photographer $1000 a day.

Joel, you said that magic number is 4k for 20 portraits. I would like to know more about your method because when I approach NGOs, everything over $500 seems to scare them. I guess you’r talking about big NGOs like HRW or Care?

On the Photo Philanthropy website, you can found a lot of NGOs desperately looking for photographers. I have contacted most of them but no one were willing to pay me. The best offer I had is" We pay for the meals, hosting and expenses. You pay for the airfare and no salary". Well if I was like 100% sure to sell the photos after to a magazine or newspaper, I wouldn’t mind to help them but that’s rarely the case. James Nachway seems to do lot of work for NGOs, I don’t think he do it for free. Ok I’m not J. N. but I still deserve some salary I guess.

by Yves Choquette | 20 Jun 2010 21:06 | Montreal, Canada | | Report spam→
I have worked with the non-profit sector for over 20 years. Most of my clients are international NGO’s.
When I was starting I charged rates similar to those posted (20 years ago). One day, I was talking with a non-profit, faith-based client. It was very hot in my apartment, I was sweating, because I couldn’t afford to repair the air conditioner. He told me that he had to end the conversation because he had to get home to meet his swimming pool cleaner.
My rates went up. Well over double the rates given above. And, I’m still in business. I don’t think many people can stay in the business very long charging the above rates.

by Richard Lord | 21 Jun 2010 09:06 | Nairobi and Kisumu, Kenya | | Report spam→
If this is of any help….generally I charge $350 to 450 (day rate) small NGO’s, but un, care, amref etc I would charge up to $600. NGO’s raise funds by using photographers on a one time basis. They do not pay for your rent, health, gear or anything else….do not let them pay peanuts for not emplying a photographer 12 months a year. I expect them to pay expenses and that everything including: meals, accomodation, the works. If they can pay they should pay prof rates. If you decide to do charity then let it be zero day rate.

by [former member] | 21 Jun 2010 10:06 | Nairobi, Kenya | | Report spam→
The figure I posted above is based on a project “package” I devised for local non-profits concerned primarily with social services. I’ve done it a dozen times and its a formula and budget that works for local non-profits. Again, it’s local work which keeps me connected to my community. I can afford to do this once or twice a year. The rest is editorial, commercial, print sales, and portrait commissions at standard for-profit rates. So, this is not directly related to Erin’s original post which is more about international NGO rates, but is at least tangential.

by Joel Sackett | 21 Jun 2010 15:06 (ed. Jun 21 2010) | Puget Sound, Washington, United States | | Report spam→
If anyone here, concern by this sensitive issue and know personally Nancy Faresse, founder of Photo Philanthropy, maybe he (or she) should try to speak to her. I have contacted her, telling my worries about he fact her organization promote volunteers work between photographers and NGOs but she never contacted me back.

Photo Philanthropy is a wonderful initiative but, as we have already discuss here, we deserve some salary otherwise, how to continue our works? I hope they understand that what we ask is legitime and is not a harsh critic on their fantastic work.

I just received an answer from Eliza so last point of my reply does not apply anymore.

by Yves Choquette | 22 Jun 2010 01:06 (ed. Jun 22 2010) | Montreal, Canada | | Report spam→
great post and responses… thank you for sharing!

by Lindsey Ross | 22 Jun 2010 20:06 | Mirebalais, Haiti | | Report spam→
What did the letter from Photo Philanthropy say?

by Richard Lord | 23 Jun 2010 09:06 | Nairobi and Kisumu, Kenya | | Report spam→
Richard,

Eliza from PP told me that she’s going to read all the posts on the subject here and after that, she will clarify the situation for where PP stand in that issue. I don’t know if she’s going to do it here, don’t know if she’s LS member so it’s all I can say for now. That is why I suggest if “maybe” someone know Nancy Falese (founder) or Eliza personally ( I don’t) could give them a call or an email about the confusion surrounding NGOs funding and their abilities to pay decent salary to Photographers (or other workers).

Another interesting point, there’s an organisation that set-up workshops combining photographers and NGOs workers but just can’t find the link (forgot to bookmark it). Is anyone know url detail about them?

by Yves Choquette | 23 Jun 2010 13:06 | Montreal, Canada | | Report spam→
I finally received an answer from Eliza of photo Philanthropy, here it is:

Yves, here is a post I wrote with some of my thoughts: http://blog.photophilanthropy.org/2010/06/28/pay-up-photographers-and-ngos-and/ —I’d love your comments on it! And please feel free to share with the lightstalkers discussion. I thought it was an excellent series of suggestions and perspectives, and I’m so glad to have read it! Thanks for drawing my attention to it, and for your thoughtful comments! All the best, eliza

http://blog.photophilanthropy.org/2010/06/28/pay-up-photographers-and-ngos-and/

by Yves Choquette | 28 Jun 2010 23:06 | Montreal, Canada | | Report spam→
Thanks for the link to the blog. Here was my contribution to the discussion:

As a professional photographer with over 20 years of experience working extensively with NGOs, I am often approached to donate services. My replies:
1. Do you work for free?
2. Does your designer work for free?
2. Does your printer work for free?
3. Does your webmaster work for free?
4. If I were to donate my services, could you guarantee that my photos would be presented only in print publications/websites that are at an equivalent level of professional quality as my photos?

If the answer is yes to all of the above, I evaluate whether the organization’s mission is one to which I wish to donate. Would I make a cash donation to it?

by Richard Lord | 30 Jun 2010 09:06 | Nairobi and Kisumu, Kenya | | Report spam→
My wife employs LOADS of photographers (for the UN) and she pays $450 per day plus DSA, take it or leave it………..

by [former member] | 02 Jul 2010 04:07 | New Delhi, India | | Report spam→
Hello Tom

Well that is great for your wife, so maybe you could give her email so photographers like me who’s interested at working
for UN could send her a portfolio or an URL link to our work?

Yves

by Yves Choquette | 02 Jul 2010 18:07 | Montreal, Canada | | Report spam→
@George Mulala, does your rate include the expenses (meals, accommodations, etc.) or are expenses in addition to the rate? If so, do you use a standard per diem rate for the specific country, or are you reimbursed for actual expenses? Thanks for all the info everyone.

by Doug Klostermann | 21 Jul 2010 18:07 | Cambridge, MA, United States | | Report spam→
Doug

My daily rate is my salary/wages. It does not include the expenses I will incur to get the story. usually I will anticipate the expenses, Eg: transport, (plane, train, cabs…fixers/security come here) meals, accomodation, visa’s licence to work etc. Any NGO with an eye on the money will ask you for this list before they give you a job. I also point out before taking up the gig that some expenses can/may come up. eg: if I have stay an extra day because some guy who i need to photograph is suddenly taken ill or something. If you do several of these jobs…it will be farely easy to nail your expnses to almost the dollar. if you work in remote places in africa where even receipts may be a problem…you have to let them in advance…..it saves lots of unpleasant exchanges. For most african countries, I ask between 350-400 usd. for countries with civil strive/hardship, I ask for 500usd or even more. So that means there are some NGO who won’t work with me coz of their low budgets.

by [former member] | 22 Jul 2010 07:07 | Nairobi, Kenya | | Report spam→
Richard,

is not a very good analogy to compare photographers to accountants, printers or webmasters working in NGO HQs. NGOs have something that most photographers need – access. hence the well-known and mutually accepted barter between photogs and NGO clients.

Yves,

Regarding NGOs, to me its a simple case of supply and demand. those NGOs that can afford to not pay (because they get a lot requests from pros offering the aforementioned pictures-for-access barter) photographers, don’t. Smaller NGOs (not MSF, MDM, Save the Children, Care, etc) do pay because they have no other options. They also heavily rely on free or cheap photobanks.

Overall, I’d say that unless NGOs come to you specifically, because they want your services only (as might have been the case with the recent MSF/VII “Starved for Attention” collaboration) my advise is to charge NGOs only what you can afford to charge them.

by Misha Friedman | 22 Jul 2010 17:07 (ed. Jul 22 2010) | New York, United States | | Report spam→
Thanks George.

by Doug Klostermann | 26 Jul 2010 15:07 | Cambridge, MA, United States | | Report spam→
Misha, you’r right

I remember someone here on LS told me month ago, unless you have a killer portfolio, big NGOs, like HRW, won’t knock at your door.

by Yves Choquette | 26 Jul 2010 15:07 | Montreal, Canada | | Report spam→
Erin, I agree somewhat with Richard here. Only consider a reduced price or working for free if you would also (hypothetically) donate money to their cause. Other than that, propose your regular rate and a reduction for any assistance that they are offering. Perhaps you want to offer a discount for keeping all the rights (thus all the control) – you may want to use the photos for exhibitions or other projects.

In the end you have to decide how important the job is to you. A small NGO does not give you a lot of exposure like, I do not know, the IRC would give. On the other hand, if you figure you like the mission; you get to go to places for free you would normally not go; you have an opportunity to bolster your portfolio; and make some money and do not have to say no to a better paying job – go for it. Just never ever rely on promises of a bigger job around the corner. It will be most certainly forgotten.

by asb360 | 01 Aug 2010 17:08 | NYC, United States | | Report spam→
I have worked for international NGOs as an humanitarian for many years but eventually changed paths and now devote 100% to photography. And I’m surprised that this debate even exists.

I don’t know what’s wrong with people’s perceptions’ of NGOs, and it might have something to do with the expression ‘higher moral ground’ claimed by some of these.

Since NGOs are by definition private, why should they be treated differently than companies? Just because they are not-for-profit or because they work to assist people and change the world? What does that difference make? And what does that difference make to YOU as a photographer?

Of course they pay their staff, their taxes, their webmaster and so on. They might have volunteers, and that’s the key point here: do you want to volunteer? If so, for whatever reason, by all means work for free just like other people feel inclined to do in different posts. But there is no reason whatsoever that, just because they are NGOs, they ‘deserve’ special treatment.

In my current photographic work, I often contact national NGOs (since they give me way better access than internationals), and in my dealings with them, I often provide them with free pictures for their work. But it is in MY interest since they provide me with access and assistance. I’m not volunteering. Specially when I was working in the humanitarian world, I really think volunteering is not a good idea. NGOs need good professionals since the difference it makes in impact on the populations they work with is really big. Well, it’s the same when you photograph for them.

by Eduardo de Francisco | 17 Aug 2010 08:08 | Colombo, Sri Lanka | | Report spam→
My experience working with NGOs is that they either settle for very average photography that is given to them by people that visit the field, or more often than not (pro) photographers have worked for free, the NGO covering only their expenses. In my opinion, both of these practices devalue what we as photographers do. We must negotiate better with NGOs reminding them that they rely on powerful images to engage with potential supporters, and photographers that give away their product (to anyone) make it all the more difficult to survive. I’m passionate about photographing the ‘need’, but I believe my clients are getting a great deal. I charge a reasonable rate, and I work very hard to ensure that the client gets their moneys worth and more. You and I can ‘give back’ in other creative ways rather than jeopardising the future of professional photo-documentary making.

by Stuart Harris | 23 Aug 2010 04:08 | Hobart, Australia | | Report spam→
I too am surprised that this debate still exists.. When photographers basically ask to work for free, it damages the whole system and makes it harder for all of us to work and pay our bills.

I work 100% for UN agencies and NGOs of all sizes, and I charge every time for every day, including post-production and travel days. Access and visiting a place you have never been, with the possibility of boosting your portfolio, should never be considered as bartering tools when an NGO is approaching YOU to do work for them.

As a photographer for an NGO, I am not a photojournalist. I am a communications specialist hired to tell the story that they want to share with donors and partners. I may get some great images out of the experience, but that certainly doesn’t mean that I should reduce my rate or give my work away for free.

Separating “big” and “small” NGOs is also irrelevant unless we are talking about very small local community based organizations (CBOs), who might need a discounted rate. And even then, they are very likely under some umbrella funding from a larger organization like AMREF, etc. that can afford to pay for pictures if they want quality. MSF, Save the Children, CARE, all hire photographers to produce stills, audio, and video communications for specific press releases and mass campaigns.

Your best tool for getting work with NGOs is not to give your work away for free, it is to live in the region/country that you want to focus on! Sure, humanitarian organizations have “smaller” budgets than corporate or advertising clients, but all that means is that they will avoid hiring someone who requires a plane ticket and hotel room, if someone talented already lives in the country they need footage from.

by [former member] | 25 Aug 2010 12:08 | Juba, Southern Sudan | | Report spam→
I too am surprised that this debate still exists.. When photographers basically ask to work for free, it damages the whole system and makes it harder for all of us to work and pay our bills.

I work 100% for UN agencies and NGOs of all sizes, and I charge every time for every day, including post-production and travel days. Access and visiting a place you have never been, with the possibility of boosting your portfolio, should never be considered as bartering tools when an NGO is approaching YOU to do work for them.

As a photographer for an NGO, I am not a photojournalist. I am a communications specialist hired to tell the story that they want to share with donors and partners. I may get some great images out of the experience, but that certainly doesn’t mean that I should reduce my rate or give my work away for free.

Separating “big” and “small” NGOs is also irrelevant unless we are talking about very small local community based organizations (CBOs), who might need a discounted rate. And even then, they are very likely under some umbrella funding from a larger organization like AMREF, etc. that can afford to pay for pictures if they want quality. MSF, Save the Children, CARE, all hire photographers to produce stills, audio, and video communications for specific press releases and mass campaigns.

Your best tool for getting work with NGOs is not to give your work away for free, it is to live in the region/country that you want to focus on! Sure, humanitarian organizations have “smaller” budgets than corporate or advertising clients, but all that means is that they will avoid hiring someone who requires a plane ticket and hotel room, if someone talented already lives in the country they need footage from.

Good luck, Erin! I think your pitch above sounds right on.

by [former member] | 25 Aug 2010 12:08 | Juba, Southern Sudan | | Report spam→
I too am surprised that this debate still exists.. When photographers basically ask to work for free, it damages the whole system and makes it harder for all of us to work and pay our bills.

I work 100% for UN agencies and NGOs of all sizes, and I charge every time for every day, including post-production and travel days. Access and visiting a place you have never been, with the possibility of boosting your portfolio, should never be considered as bartering tools when an NGO is approaching YOU to do work for them.

As a photographer for an NGO, I am not a photojournalist. I am a communications specialist hired to tell the story that they want to share with donors and partners. I may get some great images out of the experience, but that certainly doesn’t mean that I should reduce my rate or give my work away for free.

Separating “big” and “small” NGOs is also irrelevant unless we are talking about very small local community based organizations (CBOs), who might need a discounted rate. And even then, they are very likely under some umbrella funding from a larger organization like AMREF, etc. that can afford to pay for pictures if they want quality. MSF, Save the Children, CARE, all hire photographers to produce stills, audio, and video communications for specific press releases and mass campaigns.

Your best tool for getting work with NGOs is not to give your work away for free, it is to live in the region/country that you want to focus on! Sure, humanitarian organizations have “smaller” budgets than corporate or advertising clients, but all that means is that they will avoid hiring someone who requires a plane ticket and hotel room, if someone talented already lives in the country they need footage from.

Good luck, Erin! I think your pitch above sounds right on.

by [former member] | 25 Aug 2010 12:08 | Juba, Southern Sudan | | Report spam→
I too am surprised that this debate still exists.. When photographers offer to basically work for free, it damages the whole system and makes it harder for all of us to pay our bills.

I work 100% for UN agencies and NGOs of all sizes, and I charge every time for every day, including post-production and travel days. Access and visiting a place you have never been, with the possibility of boosting your portfolio, should never be considered as bartering tools when an NGO is approaching YOU to do work for them.

As a photographer for an NGO, I am not a photojournalist. I am a communications specialist hired to tell the story that they want to share with donors and partners. I may get some great images out of the experience, but that certainly doesn’t mean that I should reduce my rate or give my work away for free.

Separating “big” and “small” NGOs is irrelevant unless we are talking about very small local community based organizations (CBOs), who might need a discounted rate. And even then, they are very likely under some umbrella funding from a larger organization like AMREF, etc. that CAN afford to pay for pictures if they really want quality. MSF, Save the Children, CARE, all hire photographers to produce stills, audio and video communications for press releases and mass campaigns.

Your best tool for getting work with NGOs is not to give your work away for free, it is to live in the region/country that you want to focus on. Sure, humanitarian organizations have “smaller” budgets than corporate or advertising clients, but all that means is that they will avoid hiring someone who requires a plane ticket and hotel room, if someone talented already lives in the country they need footage from.

Good luck, Erin! I think your pitch above sounds right on.

by [former member] | 25 Aug 2010 12:08 | Juba, Southern Sudan | | Report spam→
The blog post reference above has moved here:
http://photophilanthropy.org/2010/06/28/pay-up-photographers-and-ngos-and/

by Trevor Christensen | 26 Nov 2010 01:11 | Utah, United States | | Report spam→
Not moved, that link just a post on another blog, inspired by this conversation.

by Shannon Gabriel Gold | 26 Nov 2010 04:11 | NYC, United States | | Report spam→
My point is the old address resolves to the main domain now, but this link takes you to the post.

by Trevor Christensen | 26 Nov 2010 05:11 | Utah, United States | | Report spam→
Found this discussion very interesting! I am about to get into NGO´s (smaller ones and locals for start) and this are just the few answers I was looking for.

The first and more important conclusion I got is “I may get some great images out of the experience, but that certainly doesn’t mean that I should reduce my rate or give my work away for free.” – Totally agree with you Jenn :)

“Since NGOs are by definition private, why should they be treated differently than companies? Just because they are not-for-profit or because they work to assist people and change the world? What does that difference make? And what does that difference make to YOU as a photographer?”
- Well it does some difference Eduardo, to the ones who are being helped and to the photographer as well, such as “bolstering your portfolio” (asb360). Paradoxical isn´t it? Indeed, because it still doesn´t pay the bills!

So I believe the best way is finding a fair trade according to the proposals (project, who´s proposing, location, what are the risks, expenses, etc), like the one Erin is about to propose. Good luck Erin!

Bottom of line, don´t give away your work for free. Even if a trade is made with or without any money!

I am still waiting for that e-mail? (Tom Sampson):D
Cheers,

by Manuel Ribeiro | 02 Dec 2010 23:12 (ed. Dec 2 2010) | Sydney, Australia | | Report spam→
Hi, this happens to be a very insightful and interesting discussion. I hve been working with NGOs in India, basically in and around Delhi, but find it difficult to negotiate payments.

Also, I find that a lot of the NGOs click their own photos through point-and-shoots and many of these pictures actually come out well and are indeed used.

by Rahul | 05 Dec 2010 05:12 | Delhi, India | | Report spam→
The more I work with NGOs, the more convinced I am that giving them a break on the cost of photographs (or any other media work) enables their often poor communications strategies. This is a disservice to humanity if the NGO does indeed have a unique and pressing message to get out. While in the past I might have been willing to work for little or free if I appreciated the NGO’s mission, now I am much more likely to do so if they can compensate for their lack of financial commitment by investing other resources (time, personnel, etc.) to ensure the communications strategy of the project is a success. If they can’t do that, then they are making poor use of my skills and I should apply them elsewhere.

by Ida | 18 Dec 2010 23:12 | Brooklyn, United States | | Report spam→

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Participants

John Robinson, Photographer John Robinson
Photographer
(works with light)
Jika Joe , South Africa
richard sobol, photojournalist, author richard sobol
photojournalist, author
(www.richardsobol.com)
[undisclosed location].
Tom Van Cakenberghe, Tom Van Cakenberghe
Kathmandu , Nepal
Allen Craig Schlossman, Cultural Documentary Allen Craig Schlossman
Cultural Documentary
(People, Places and Stories)
Bogota , Colombia
Joel Sackett, photographer Joel Sackett
photographer
Puget Sound, Washington , United States ( AAA )
Gregory Sharko, photographer Gregory Sharko
photographer
Brooklyn, New York , United States ( JFK )
Yves Choquette, Photojournalist Yves Choquette
Photojournalist
Montreal , Canada
Richard Lord, Photographer Richard Lord
Photographer
(Worldwide Corporate and NGO Ph)
Nairobi And Kisumu , Kenya
Lindsey Ross, Photographer Lindsey Ross
Photographer
(Photographer)
Santa Barbara , United States ( LAX )
Doug Klostermann, Photographer and Writer Doug Klostermann
Photographer and Writer
(humanitarian photographer)
Cambridge, Ma , United States
Misha Friedman, photographer Misha Friedman
photographer
New York , United States
asb360, Humanitarian Photographer asb360
Humanitarian Photographer
Addis Ababa , Ethiopia ( ADD )
Eduardo de Francisco, Eduardo de Francisco
Dar Es Salaam , Tanzania
Stuart Harris, Photographer Stuart Harris
Photographer
Hobart , Australia
Trevor Christensen, Trevor Christensen
Utah , United States
Shannon Gabriel Gold, Shannon Gabriel Gold
Nyc , United States ( JFK )
Manuel Ribeiro, Photojournalist Manuel Ribeiro
Photojournalist
(Photographer)
Wollongong , Australia ( SYD )
Rahul, Journalist Rahul
Journalist
Delhi , India
Ida, Media Strategist Ida
Media Strategist
Brooklyn , United States


Keywords

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