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Mongolian getting there

How, what, and how to get there……….?

by Patrick Brown at 2006-06-15 16:53:32 UTC (ed. Mar 12 2008 ) Bangkok , Thailand | Bookmark | | Report spam→

There are trains from Beijing to Ulaanbaatar a few times a week.
I was unable to book tickets from NY due to an influx of tourists
for the Nadaam festival (July 11-13). I’m going to try local trains
through China, once I reach Beijing.

by John Francis Peters | 15 Jun 2006 18:06 | brooklyn, United States | | Report spam→
You can fly from Beijing, and also fly from Tokyo…..
cheers,
Jeremy

by Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert | 16 Jun 2006 00:06 | Tokyo, Japan | | Report spam→
… and Moscow

by Damon Lee Perry | 16 Jun 2006 01:06 | Beijing, China | | Report spam→
There must be a direct flight to go to Ulaanbator from Bangkok.

by [former member] | 16 Jun 2006 02:06 | Seoul, Korea (South) | | Report spam→
Patrick, I fly from BKK to Ulan Bator via Beijing on July 7th via Air China (not China Airlines). A little over $600 one way and about $1,100 roundtrip. Very expensive. Sri Lankan has the best rate roundtrip from here to Beijing but the trick is getting a cheap connection from Beijing to Ulan Bator (I haven’t figured that part out). You could take the train from Beijing but then you have visas and other delays getting ticket, etc. I don’t have anymore time to write but you can call me if you want 07 235 0732. I’ve been to Mongolia twice. I leave BKK on June 18th.

by Roger Arnold | 16 Jun 2006 02:06 | Bangkok, Thailand | | Report spam→
I just returned from MN yesterday, though I took a more conventional air route thru Beijing and then via MIAT or Air China to UB. I can imagine what that route is like around Naadam. Oooff!


There is indeed a train from Beijing directly to UB. It is a long ride, but a friend took it last week and said it was fine (except that he got Genghis’ revenge in Beijing before he got on the train — based on extensive experience he reported the train had good crappers). There is a long wait (five hours?) at the China/MN border where they change the undercarriage of all the cars because of the change in rail gauge (Russian vs. Chinese standards). Otherwise it is said to be a long but good ride.


But do watch out for the pickpockets in the UB station. And, yes, you need a Chinese vise EVEN if you are transiting only in the Beijing airport.

by [former member] | 16 Jun 2006 12:06 (ed. Jun 24 2006) | Washington, DC, United States | | Report spam→
avoid miat (mongolian)airlines. not in good repair. seldom enough petrol for the planes
to fly anyway. in UB you can easily hire a car and driver (bring a seatbelt with you)
at a guesthouse or you could buy a horse pretty easily. avoid the russian saddles though,
or your arse will hurt for days. expect really long drive times between places. great
place. fermented mare’s milk tastes like vomit however sometimes unavoidable. Milly’s,
a cafe, is the local hangout for journos and peace corp workers. and people wanting to
avoid fermented mare’s milk.

by julia s. ferdinand | 16 Jun 2006 12:06 | paris, France | | Report spam→
The train from Moscow or Beijing is really good traveling but tickets are hard to get in summer.

Flying to UB… Aeroflot does a good job but perhaps not from Bangkok. Sri Lankan is cheapest it seems. Ethiopean isn’t too dear either.

Flying locally. No experience. Traveling by car or minibus is doable but don’t expect it to be cheap. Petrol is bl88dy expensive nowadays. Plus a driver and a guide/cook are gonna cost you as well. Horses only when you’re not too tall for the short, stocky Mongolian horses. The wooden, Mongolian saddles are generally too narrow for our fat western arses. You won’t last a day in them.

When in UB, I’d avoid places like Milly’s. I’m in the country to meet local people, not more westerners. But that’s just me. For food, step into a local canteen. The food is good, cheap and plentyful and there are often raids to cull the ones with poor hygiene. Locals can also tell which ones are good.

Drop me a PM or email if you want more information. I’ll be in UB after August 16.

by Remy Lang | 16 Jun 2006 21:06 | Amsterdam, Netherlands | | Report spam→
you may have this sorted. I have however taken a local train in beijing to Erlian, the border of mongolia, you then just buy a ticket on the local mongolian train that will take you to UB. you have to cross the border, which may take the best part of a day, and possibly stay overnight in Erlian, which shouldnt cost anymore than 50 Yuan. This is a cheap option and not really a hassle. a little bit longer than direct from BJ to UB, and you dont get to see the gobi as you pass it overnight. LUCKY YOU….Mongolia is amazing to say the least. would love to see your images when you get back!

by Rahima Hayes | 24 Jun 2006 00:06 | Melbourne, Australia | | Report spam→
you may have this sorted. I have however taken a local train in beijing to Erlian, the border of mongolia, you then just buy a ticket on the local mongolian train that will take you to UB. you have to cross the border, which may take the best part of a day, and possibly stay overnight in Erlian, which shouldnt cost anymore than 50 Yuan. This is a cheap option and not really a hassle. a little bit longer than direct from BJ to UB, and you dont get to see the gobi as you pass it overnight. LUCKY YOU….Mongolia is amazing to say the least. would love to see your images when you get back!

by Rahima Hayes | 24 Jun 2006 00:06 | Melbourne, Australia | | Report spam→
Hi, I went to Ullan Bataar by bus, I can not remember the exact location of the bus station, but it was a sleep over bus…and got there safe and sound. The bus actually is fitted with beds.

by Kloie Picot | 26 Jun 2006 01:06 | Taiwan, Taiwan | | Report spam→
The bus is a means. It’s not too uncomfortable, really, but the beds are not European-sized. :) I’m not 6’ tall but I had trouble fitting in them and sleeping properly. The trip from Erlian to Beijing takes about 12 hours. From the Mongolian-Chinese border you can take a local Mongolian train to UB. Be sure to have tickets in advance.

by Remy Lang | 26 Jun 2006 09:06 | Amsterdam, Netherlands | | Report spam→
Hi Patrick, i am a photographer living in Mongolia… if you need a guide when you are here in Ulaan Bataar … send me a message … maybe i can help you ….. a lot of greetings / Toshka

by TOSHKA Batjargal | 30 Jul 2006 14:07 | Ulaanbatar _, Mongolia | | Report spam→
Reme, where are you living? Traditionel gers are made of felt, and felt does not survive very well and very long in wet climates. Mongolia has a very dry climate and only the summer has some rain; excellent climate for a felt ger. If you live in a wet(tish) climate, I’d recommend not buying a ger. At least not for permanent residence, though perhaps as a summer home it could work.

by Remy Lang | 30 Jul 2006 18:07 | Amsterdam, Netherlands | | Report spam→
I know of an instance in which two gers were brought back to the US and put up in a rather large back yard in toney Greenwich, Connecticut. Within one year the higher humidity of the US East Coast rendered them so mouldly as to be unusable. All the felt and covering had to be destroyed.


If you are determined to have one, it occurred that one could buy the frame and door in MN, then have a sailmaker sew up a cover of Dacron or some other water-resistant cloth – in essence giving one a round tent with walls.

by [former member] | 30 Jul 2006 19:07 | Washington, DC, United States | | Report spam→

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Participants

Patrick Brown, Photographer Patrick Brown
Photographer
Bangkok , Thailand
John Francis Peters, Photographer John Francis Peters
Photographer
Karachi , Pakistan
Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert, Freelance Photographer Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert
Freelance Photographer
Tokyo , Japan
Damon Lee Perry, Damon Lee Perry
[undisclosed location].
Roger Arnold, Cameraman Photographer Roger Arnold
Cameraman Photographer
Bangkok , Thailand
julia s. ferdinand, photographer julia s. ferdinand
photographer
Chiang Mai , Thailand ( CNX )
Remy Lang, Para legal Remy Lang
Para legal
(V.S.O.P.)
Amsterdam , Netherlands ( AMS )
Rahima Hayes, Multimedia, Photographer Rahima Hayes
Multimedia, Photographer
(www.rahimahayes.com)
Bogor , Indonesia
Kloie Picot, photojournalist/filmmaker Kloie Picot
photojournalist/filmmaker
Lung Tan , Taiwan
TOSHKA Batjargal, Professional Photographer TOSHKA Batjargal
Professional Photographer
Ulaanbatar , Mongolia


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