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pain in the back

Hi Friends,
I am thinking I am probably not the only photographer out there with ongoing problems with lower back pain.

Anyone have some good suggestions as to how to best carry equipment, etc.?

Also, I am thinking it might be possible to switch to using lighter equipment… anyone had any luck with any of the better point and shoot cameras for professional work?

Thanks for the help & suggestions!

Jodi Hilton

by Jodi Hilton at 2006-09-24 17:30:26 UTC (ed. Mar 12 2008 ) Boston, MA , United States | Bookmark | | Report spam→

Point and shoot digitals still have lots of problems but I have worked with my c7070 even on news assignments, and it performed pretty well, though I would not necessarily recommend it. Actually the smaller DSLRs are not all that weighty really. My F100 outweighs a D70. Angel Valentin was just raving about his finepix f30 on another thread and it does look like quite a nice little camera, with very clean files at ISO800 but no RAW and apparently not really good at dealing with highlights. Maybe you could buy the new Leica M8 when it comes out (if you sell all your other equipment! thing costs a lot of money).

I think the trick is even distribution of the weight around the body so that the lower back doesnt get undue stress. (Good posture doesnt hurt either) There is a thread on here somewhere about various belt systems that take the strain off the back. A few years back I had a weird inflammation of my right shoulder, where I habitually sling my camera bag. The thing swelled up nastily, hot shooting pain, and medications did nothing to ease it. I went to an acupuncturist and after a few sessions, I was cured. Personally, though I feel like a fool when I wear one, I like photo jackets. You can stuff a couple lenses,film, whatever, in the pockets and you arent encumbered with a bag.

by Jon Anderson | 24 Sep 2006 21:09 | Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic | | Report spam→
I dont know the selection of acupuncturists in Boston, but of course you have Chinatown there, and I am sure you can find a good practitioner. The trick is in finding a genuinely thorough acupuncturist who takes time to trace the pain and really follow through with the needles. Sounds painful but it isnt; you leave the office with a mild euphoria, and during the treatment you just kind of relax and float. Sometimes they might stick a needle in too deep — it does take a certain touch that comes with experience — but generally you feel no pain. But the doctor really has to know his stuff. Some of the Westerners who are now learning the skill in an attempt to wed Occidental and Oriental medical practices are not always very thorough because they lack experience I think. An old roommate of mine who plays string bass and seeks regular treatment for his bursitis recommended my original chinese doctor, but he himself has now moved on to a Japanese practitioner whose method is somewhat different. You might want to look into that too.

by Jon Anderson | 24 Sep 2006 23:09 | Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic | | Report spam→
First, ditch the shoulder bag. They will kill your back, and cause pain all the way down from your shoulder to your foot. They also throw you off balance. I use a Domke belt with a few Domke pouches attached. They cost about 20 bucks for each piece and come in different sizes. I like the Domke because although they offer little protection, they are very low profile and easy to maneuver through a crowd… dont draw much attention, that sort of thing. There are other systems out there including Newswear.com which makes a very popular chest/vest thing that looks like a suicide bomb belt. It is really well made and very functional, though it looks kind of funny when you are wearing it. I see lots of people using it as a shoulder bag part time and as a vest other times. Kenesis also makes a pretty good system as does think tank..

Ideally the mainthing is to get the weight off your shoulder and place it around your waist, or in a backpack if that suits you.

-m

by Micah Walter | 24 Sep 2006 23:09 | Portsmouth, Dominica | | Report spam→
Yoga works very well.

by Barry Milyovsky | 25 Sep 2006 00:09 | NYC, United States | | Report spam→
My Tamrac backpack is made to hold gear in the bottom, and extras in a front zip area and a small compartment for a jacket or whatever up top. It is small enough that it itself is light. If I use the waist belt, I can pretty much wear it with 2 film cameras and gear for 5 hours or so without total suffering the next day. But I do take a good bit of ibuprophen cause my wrists and neck take the hit..Last weekend I shot for 13 hours with little break often wearing the pack..what hurt most the next day were the backs of my arms fro holding the camera and my gluts from all the squats, but my back was okay.

by [former member] | 25 Sep 2006 00:09 | Brooklyn, NY, United States | | Report spam→
I’ve taken to carrying two Domke shoulder bags slung diagonally accross both shoulders. I’ve found that this allows me to distribute the weight evenly while having constant access to whatever I am carrying while at the same time not being too bulky. I’m also going minimal on everything I shoot now, If I dont 100% need something, and can make a workaround for it I wont carry it.

by [former member] | 25 Sep 2006 01:09 | Tokyo, Japan | | Report spam→
Check out the Domke/Tiffen site. There are some belt systems that allow you to attach the series of classical bags to our body i a way that may alleviate the stress.

by [former member] | 25 Sep 2006 02:09 | Washington, DC, United States | | Report spam→
Jodi, I feel your pain! :)

I go to a chiropractor every three weeks (after three years, my neck stays straight, no more popped ribs, but the sacrum still likes to go out of whack), get massages as often as I can afford, pick things up bending my knees not my back, do ab crunches when I remember (makes a HUGE difference!), have ditched the shoulder bag years ago and switched to a backpack, let the assistant (if there is one) carry stuff, drink lots of water, and tell my lower back I love it.

Still haul my clunky Pentax 6×7 around, though, I have a wooden handle for it so it never dangles from my neck. I have convinced myself shooting with it is upper body exercise and has nothing to do with my back pain. Hm. Could be wrong.

by Imke Lass | 25 Sep 2006 03:09 (ed. Sep 25 2006) | Savannah, GA, United States | | Report spam→
I switched to a belt system two years ago, I don’t look as cool but my back is much better, so much better that I never realized how much my hand hurt before.

by doug mcgoldrick | 25 Sep 2006 04:09 | chicago, United States | | Report spam→
It helps to strengthen your back with yoga or whatever. I started doing simple pull-ups on my local monkey bars and was surprised at how much it improves my posture and makes it possible for me to spend even more hours hauling around too much gear and spending too much time sitting at my computer.

by Thorne Anderson | 25 Sep 2006 07:09 | Amsterdam, Netherlands | | Report spam→
I took my old rifle ammo pouches and an old Army web belt and made a belt system. My back and should love it. Much easier to work with than a should bag.

by Bill Putnam | 25 Sep 2006 08:09 | Portland, Oregon, United States | | Report spam→
lets all just blame canon for making very heavy cameras……
i think that unfortunatelly back pains come with our job. we re bending all the time and while we re doing it our backs are always very tense because of the necessary concentration. i tried belts and all of that but the small domke bag is still good for certain shooting conditions. i try to use as many back packs as i can avoiding big shoulder bags to transport equipment. i try to avoid carrying the 70-200 when i know i might not use it and to shoot only with one camera if i can.
yoga does help. our job is a bad combination between long hours in front of a lap top and days of walking and shooting around. some days the pain is really bad. plus the lower back somatizes a lot of stress and worries. that’s what i read. try to exercise as much as you can to strengthen your back mussles. if you ever do embeds a good investment is a lighter high tech body armor. when carrying a lot of gear shoes are very important. good posture is fondamental when working on a desk ( too bad i never follow all of this ). a big problem is carrying all the gear to airports through long train – subway rides. when working with the military its necessary at times to be able to carry all the luggage at once. its hard when you have 3 or 4 bags, two cameras hanging on the shoulders, body armor and kevlar.

by [former member] | 25 Sep 2006 10:09 | Munich, Germany | | Report spam→
Worst lower back pain I ever got was from editing. I was editing a library of pictures at an agency in Paris and was spending 50-60 hours a week working at a lighttable. At end of three weeks I was in trouble. Almost passed out in the Metro one morning on way to work. Eventually, I loaded up on Advil which helped. In my case, however, eventually I ended up with great pain in my shoulder. It wasn’t my shoulder out of whack but extreme arthritis in my neck. I was told that carrying a heavy bag on one shoulder causes it. Duh. Today, I carry as little as I can and distribute it as evenly as possible. Belt systems are okay. Backpacks are okay, but hard to work out of. Nathan Shanahan’s suggestion of the two (small, I guess) Domke’s worn across the body is an interesting one. Jodi—good luck. There’s a lot of good advice on this thread.

by John Robert Fulton Jr. | 25 Sep 2006 12:09 | Fort Worth, Texas, United States | | Report spam→
LowePro also makes a good verstile belt system that allows you to pick from about 8 or 10 different sizes and conigurations of pouchs and 2 different belt sizes. I bought the small belt and a few pouches lasy year and it really does the trick, unless you need the silly laptop all the time, then the backpack seems the only choice.
Good luck
Jeremy

by Jeremy M. Lange | 25 Sep 2006 12:09 | Brooklyn, NY, United States | | Report spam→
Thanks to all those who replied. I really never expected so much support and advice. You guys are the greatest. I’ve started with the yoga, backpack and ibuprofen.
One question I have to those who suggested belt systems, is, where do you put your camera when you are on the subway or in a place where you might be a target for crime? It doesn’t seem wise to me to have them always dangling off the shoulders.

Thanks!

Jodi

by Jodi Hilton | 25 Sep 2006 15:09 | Boston, MA, United States | | Report spam→
I just leave em dangling, tucked back if I am really worried about it, but if its not out it seems useless and trying to get it out of the bag is way more obvious than shooting a couple of frames discreetly.
Jeremy

by Jeremy M. Lange | 25 Sep 2006 15:09 | Brooklyn, NY, United States | | Report spam→
I try to be flexible and adjust to where I am and what I am doing. Which is why a modular belt type system works pretty well for me. If I am on foot, say shooting a parade or something, I usually have the belt with a couple lenses and flash etc around my waiste and two cameras on each shoulder, or sometimes just one. Then, I have a slim backpack on my back which has extra stuff and my laptop. This is usally a pretty balanced weight for me and easy to cary, plus if need be I can stuff a body in the backpack if I dont want it to be visible.

If I get to an assignment where I can put down the backp[ack or leave it in the car I just go with the belt. I can even shoulder the belt if I dont feel like putting it around my waist at the moment. On some types of assignments all I reall yneed the belt for is a place to hold flash cards, or batteries. So I just add one pouch and use my pockets. It really depends on the weather, and the type of work I am doing. For street photography, I leave most stuff at home and just bring a body and an extra lens and a small jansport type backpack. This keeps me pretty low profile and I can throw the body in the backpack if need be. But I dont add the belt as it looks a little odd, depending on what I am wearing.

Basically, just go out and buy all the belts, pouches, backpacks, and accesories you can afford and figure out which works best for what. Don’t try to come up with the one perfect camera bag for every possible situation life will throw at you!

Yoga/Advil seems like a decent place to start!

-m

by Micah Walter | 25 Sep 2006 16:09 | Portsmouth, Dominica | | Report spam→
Pouches put the weight on your hips and legs – preferable to a backpack. Pouches saved me. When necessary I also carry a small backpack in case I want to carry a second body or occasionally want to drop my cameras in the backpack for subway travel — or a large backpack in cases where I want to be able to drop cameras along with my entire belt/pouches inside.


When my Domke pouches were shredded by an unruly mob in Baghdad a few years ago I discovered that Domke had stopped manufacturing them, but a recent Domke search on B&H turned some for sale again. Popular demand?


Newswear pouches aren’t quite as low profile as the Domke, but offer slightly better padding.


For my longer pouch, which carries an 80-200, I added an extra cushion inside the bottom (literally a small pincushion) and a foam liner inside the front of the pouch to protect the lense better.

by Thorne Anderson | 25 Sep 2006 16:09 (ed. Sep 25 2006) | Amsterdam, Netherlands | | Report spam→
Feldenkreis is great!

by Ruediger Carl Bergmann | 25 Sep 2006 16:09 | Augsburg, Germany | | Report spam→
I’m using the Lumix dmcLX-1. I can not carry anything heavier because of back injuries.

When in Boston I go to see genius chiropractor Dr. Mercurio in J.P. . He is excellent.

by Shelley F Marlow | 10 Nov 2006 15:11 | Brooklyn, United States | | Report spam→
Jodi -

Having suffered a bad muscular-skeletal injury a couple of years ago I would recommend treatment from a good physiotherapist (many also incorporate acupuncture in to their treatment methods). One session with the physio did more for my pain than a month of the heavy duty pain killers my doctor prescribed!

As other have said, backpacks can help, but only if you get one that can be adjusted correctly. I now use a Billingham photobag insert inside an ordinary non-photo backpack. Buy the insert first then shop around for a backpack that will fit it. I’d recommend going to a specialist hiking shop as they can best advise on a backpack suitable for your body size/shape. I also use Lowepro pouches on a belt when I’m not too bothered about people knowing I’m carrying camera kit. I also use the pouches inside my backpack sometimes as they give good protection.

by Nicola J Cutts | 20 Nov 2006 16:11 | London, United Kingdom | | Report spam→
Jodi,
I have just started using one of those new Lowepro slingbags, walking around with one on for several hours on a few occasions over the past couple of weeks in Mexico, carrying some medium format gear. It distributed the load much more evenly than any shoulder bag I’ve ever owned. They make two sizes.

by John Trotter | 20 Nov 2006 16:11 | Brooklyn, NY, United States | | Report spam→
Buddies ,i think isnt a theme of belts or lighter bags & cameras etc.In general all of us working hard or less and we forget to look after our body . So i think yoga or a fitness programm is much better than thinking a lighter camera or a new system of belts.

by [former member] | 20 Nov 2006 17:11 | Athens, Greece | | Report spam→
First of all I reduce the weight if possible. If I get some information of the place where I´m taking pictures, I can leave one or two lenses at home.
And then if my back hurts me, acupunctur is the best medicine I got to know!! 5 to 10 times in two month and I´m fixed for the next 10 years.

by Ruediger Carl Bergmann | 20 Nov 2006 17:11 | Augsburg, Germany | | Report spam→
Jodi, I have a great Chiropracter (Dr.) in Natick, MA…She is awesome, and has taught me some good stretching exercises. Please contact me for info.

I, too am taking less gear….I have a bag made by ‘Eagle Creek," It’s like a purse, but it’s a great travel bag, I can hold 1 body and 2 lens’ and wallet….also, it doesn’t yell ‘camera here’. I got it at EMS a few years ago.
I think sitting in front of a computer all day and driving is what is killing me….

by [former member] | 20 Nov 2006 19:11 | Boston, United States | | Report spam→
I discovered this site lightstalkers.com yesterday and I love it. This summer I had a lot of assignments up to 12 hours and after 10 hours I was really afraid that something might happen to my lower back. After the last long assignment 4 weeks ago the pain did not vanish. Since years I use my backpack and do exercises to strengthen the muscles in the lower back. A few weeks ago I started with yoga. I think the session yesterday evening really helped me. And now it helps me a lot to know that I am not the only one having trouble with so much weight. I will check out the belt systems. Indeed! Thanks!!!

by Ingrid Firmhofer | 25 Nov 2006 09:11 | Munich, Germany | | Report spam→
Just use a tactical vest/harness system. Most modern ones are modular to infinity and you can use the granade pouches to stick much fun things in to. Of course, then we have the little problem about looking like a combatant .. but, hey.. whats worse? being held in a cell for a couple of months, getting shot at by IDF guys with happy trigger fingers or have back aches forever?

by Js | 30 Nov 2006 20:11 | Lidkoping, Sweden | | Report spam→
I too have buggered my back from years of carrying a shoulder bag. I have tried everything to move the load more in line with my spine. i.e. waistbelts and backpacks. But backpacks as you know are slow to get to your gear.

The best solution so far is the Lowepro Slingshot 200AW. It will hold a pro body and three small lenses plus a flash.

I see now that Lowepro has come out with a 300AW that has a hip support. This is much better for weight distribution so I will get one.

As to your back. I found the solution after years of chiropractic assistance, by going to a phsiotherapist who does a routine of muscle rebalancing. I did the excercises three years ago and a ten minute routine of floor exercises daily and I am good to go another 20 years! it really worked for me. Research muscle rebalancing.

Cheers,
John Lund

by John Lund | 07 Dec 2006 17:12 | Nanaimo, Canada | | Report spam→
my advice is:

swim for an hour twice a week, and ditch the shoulder bag.

also, do situps and do neck/shoulder and legs excercices.

by Trond Soras | 08 Dec 2006 16:12 | Oslo, Norway | | Report spam→
i too have a lowepro minitrekker which i LOVE and used much more than the three shoulder bags in my life. much more comfortable and can be adjusted within for any camera/lens combo. i combine that with a Camelback strapped by velcro to the top and bottom grips for a water supply system. :D using the cambelback alone, i took a small climbing clamp(?) and inserted into the left/right shoulder strap, makes a nice grip for hanging a camera. then i took a small water bottle holder, resewed it so that i can slip it into the chest straps on my camelback so that i can carry other lenses (up to three) using the chest straps. i cant hang camera bodies or lenses on my waist/pants belt as i’m so skinny, my pants fall and then some other photog will snap me with pants fallen and make a zillion buckerooos!! :O the right shoulder pain i attribute to the dang PC and the mouse for which reason i purchased a wacom which I take with my laptop always, and that “fixes” the back & wrist pain for another rainy day. good luck!!!!

by fototaker | 16 Dec 2006 01:12 | Eugene, Oregon, United States | | Report spam→
hi jodi,

i switched to a belt system just this past year and it has made all the difference.

i’m using a lowepro street & field light belt with pouches for a wide angle zoom and a 70-200mm lens. i’ve velcro looped my nikon flash pouch to it double secured with a mini-carabiner, a pouch for spare batteries, a CF card holder, a cell phone holder and a couple of utility pouches i can take off/put on whenever needed. i then have a laptop backpack where i can store camera bodies and the laptop when traveling (or i put them in the utility pouches). lowepro’s harness will only work with the deluxe version of the belt (w/c i find too bulky) so instead i use a tamrac harness with the lowepro light belt. the tamrac has loops into which you can easily slip the belt ends into and adjust accordingly. now i just have to get a water bottle holder to complete the set. in the meantime the 70-200mm pouch doubles as the water bottle holder.

i also always carry a supply of myonal (Eperisone hydrochloride), a muscle relaxant, and tramadol, a pain reliever. too many years of being thrown off horses and slammed against walls and jumps have definitely taken its toll on my dear old back. :-)

by Ninfa Bito | 16 Dec 2006 02:12 | Manila, Philippines | | Report spam→
hello, lovely website, first post.just thought I’d add my experience.
Lowepro stealth backpack is very good.can put laptop and fit d200 with batt pack and 17-55 in the middle neoprene pouch.lens facing down.just snip the top to let the lens slide in.lightmeter and two flashes in the other pouches.However the waist belt is not really up to it.so get the tamrac belt,take the padded bit and thread it into the stealth belt.works great.
having said that i usually use a compudaypack.looks much more like a school backpack and not a tourist one.without camera it’s not too bad.I just put the camera inside for tube/bus.
I have other backpacks, the minitrekker is terrible,too short for me.and I’m not really that tall (182).the rover aw is great.but not really ideal for blending in.
want to try the domke jacket but it’s impossible to find here in barcelona.
oh carabiners: everywhere,hang everything from your belt.so you put the stuff inside for moving and on you for working.otherwise it’s a pain to take it off to look for something.
lower back excercices help too.as does swimming,as pointed out before.
hope this helps.

by Emanuel Ferretti | 17 Dec 2006 01:12 | barcelona, Spain | | Report spam→
hello, lovely website, first post.just thought I’d add my experience.
Lowepro stealth backpack is very good.can put laptop and fit d200 with batt pack and 17-55 in the middle neoprene pouch.lens facing down.just snip the top to let the lens slide in.lightmeter and two flashes in the other pouches.However the waist belt is not really up to it.so get the tamrac belt,take the padded bit and thread it into the stealth belt.works great.
having said that i usually use a compudaypack.looks much more like a school backpack and not a tourist one.without camera it’s not too bad.I just put the camera inside for tube/bus.
I have other backpacks, the minitrekker is terrible,too short for me.and I’m not really that tall (182).the rover aw is great.but not really ideal for blending in.
want to try the domke jacket but it’s impossible to find here in barcelona.
oh carabiners: everywhere,hang everything from your belt.so you put the stuff inside for moving and on you for working.otherwise it’s a pain to take it off to look for something.
lower back excercices help too.as does swimming,as pointed out before.
hope this helps.

by Emanuel Ferretti | 17 Dec 2006 01:12 | barcelona, Spain | | Report spam→
I hope ur back is fine now… i have some problems with it also .. even i am only 25 years old and work as photoreporter only 3 years
if u feel any pain go to doctor imediately! it’s good u look for some good equipment, but it’s not all, the health is most important! maybe some rehabilitation will help and some excercises and swimming! :)
i had laser’s therapy and it helped me a litle bit, i will also avoid to carrying heavy equipment and use belt system instead of backbacks or shoulder bags

by [former member] | 28 Dec 2006 16:12 | Katowice, Poland | | Report spam→
I hope ur back is fine now… i have some problems with it also .. even i am only 25 years old and work as photoreporter only 3 years
if u feel any pain go to doctor imediately! it’s good u look for some good equipment, but it’s not all, the health is most important! maybe some rehabilitation will help and some excercises and swimming! :)
i had laser’s therapy and it helped me a litle bit, i will also avoid to carrying heavy equipment and use belt system instead of backbacks or shoulder bags

by [former member] | 28 Dec 2006 16:12 | Katowice, Poland | | Report spam→
agreed with agnieszka:)

i am suffering last 3.5 years before i start in photography ..so lower back pain caused in the beginning some problems now i dont carry heavy stuff and i feel i am taking care fo myself but most i should exersize..also suggest u to carry a bag should hang on both of ur shoulders so weight balance on ur back or wear a jacket and put all ur needs equipment(what i mean u might have lighter stuff than old heavy equipments) no need many lenses hah:)
good luck

by Ilker Gurer | 03 Jan 2007 00:01 | Istanbul, Turkey | | Report spam→
The only long term fix for back trouble is strengthening your abdominal muscles – all of them, all the way round. Yeah, yoga and swimming are great. And it’s also very good to do gym exercises that strengthen your back and abdominal muscles.

Avoid pain killers like the plague – all they do is take the pain away and allow you to do even more damage without feeling it. Under most circumstances, they’re guaranteed to make your problems worse in the long run. Pain and inflammation are there for a reason – don’t suppress them!

by [former member] | 03 Jan 2007 21:01 (ed. Jan 3 2007) | Maldon, United Kingdom | | Report spam→
Don’t forget that back pain is also stress related. So all the excercise advice goes without question (at the very least stretch your back every single morning), but also let loose once in a while, take drugs, and have sex, especially with a partner (whether or not you know their name is not important) who gives a good massage (that is what I have heard, at least).

by [former member] | 04 Jan 2007 05:01 | Toronto, Canada | | Report spam→
hey Rita, I like the way you think but I have nobody to help me with your suggestions to relieve the back pain…. grrrr :( just in moving from Andalucia, Spain to Eugene, Oregon and adjusting to my new computer table is giving me a huge pain due to a pinched nerve!!! arrrgh!! happy new year everyOne!!!

by fototaker | 04 Jan 2007 06:01 | Eugene, Oregon, United States | | Report spam→
http://www.newswear.com/wdigitaldetail.htm

by Sarah Van den Elsken | 04 Jan 2007 09:01 | Balen, Belgium | | Report spam→
Thanks Rita,

I´ll do more of your kind of excercise!!

by Ruediger Carl Bergmann | 04 Jan 2007 10:01 | Augsburg, Germany | | Report spam→
I didn’t read all the other replies but I had terrible back pain for a long time and stopped using shoulder bags almost entirely. About six months later it faded away and has stayed mostly gone. Now it’s all waist belt pouches and I’ve had no problems.

Those shoulder bags will kill your back.

by Dave Yoder | 13 Jan 2007 23:01 | Milan, Italy | | Report spam→
Like dave, I too am pouching it these days. Back, shoulder and neck are all a mess. Have been for years. Carrying cameras and having been a serious squash player for a long time seems to have done it. Knees are still good though, surprisingly. Burn the bag.

by Paul Treacy | 14 Jan 2007 02:01 | Manhattan, United States | | Report spam→
Unfortunately, its not so easy to get rid of backache.I know that very well. U need “holistic” treatment and here you have a couple of advices: 1. Check you bed. Is is too soft/hard/misshapen? I know how it sounds, but uhm, do you sit properly?:) 2. Forget about shoulder bags. the weihgt is balanced and does’t hurt the spine when you carry a good backpack or any kind of pouch/bag with hip belt 3. I advise swimming, too. Your spine will have a chance to relax in the water. You may do exercises to sthenghten back/abdomen muscles (always jointly). Good luck!

by Ewa Chmielowska | 15 Jan 2007 16:01 | Cracow, Poland | | Report spam→
Kinesis Gear makes a great modular belt system. Check out their site at link text. I’ve been using their system for years. Most of the shooters for a suburban newspaper switched to this line after seeing me use it and wanting to avoid back pain.

Another good belt pack camera bag is the LowePro Orion AW camera beltpack. It does provide room for the camera body, not just lenses. Check the site at "link"text":http://www.lowepro.com.

by Kim Karpeles | 16 Jan 2007 15:01 | Chicago, United States | | Report spam→
not so many photographers know how to auto-back massage..please visit siem reap “7 girls massage”, they can teach you how to do it. Your back will never get pain anymore, it starts by closing your eyes…

:)

by vera mulyani | 23 Jan 2007 00:01 | new york, United States | | Report spam→

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Participants

Jodi Hilton, Photojournalist Jodi Hilton
Photojournalist
Istanbul , Turkey
Jon Anderson, Photographer & Writer Jon Anderson
Photographer & Writer
Ocala Florida , United States
Micah Walter, Artist Micah Walter
Artist
Brooklyn, Ny , United States
Barry Milyovsky, totally unprofessional Barry Milyovsky
totally unprofessional
(emperor of ice cream )
New York , United States
Imke Lass, Photographer Imke Lass
Photographer
Hamburg , Germany
doug mcgoldrick, photographer doug mcgoldrick
photographer
Chicago , United States
Thorne Anderson, Photojournalist Thorne Anderson
Photojournalist
Dallas, Tx , United States
Bill Putnam, Producer. Bill Putnam
Producer.
(Video-Photo)
Washington, D.C. , United States
John Robert Fulton Jr., Photographs John Robert Fulton Jr.
Photographs
Spring Lake, Michigan , United States
Jeremy M. Lange, Photographer Jeremy M. Lange
Photographer
Durham, North Carolina , United States ( RDU )
Ruediger Carl Bergmann, Photographer / Artist Ruediger Carl Bergmann
Photographer / Artist
Augsburg , Germany ( MUC )
Shelley F Marlow, Shelley F Marlow
Brooklyn , United States
Nicola J Cutts, Photography/Digital Nicola J Cutts
Photography/Digital
Sheffield , United Kingdom ( LBA )
John Trotter, Photographer John Trotter
Photographer
Brooklyn, Ny , United States ( JFK )
Ingrid Firmhofer, photojournalist Ingrid Firmhofer
photojournalist
Munich , Germany ( AAA )
Js, Js
Oslo , Norway
John Lund, Writer/Photographer John Lund
Writer/Photographer
Nanaimo , Canada
Trond Soras, Photojournalist Trond Soras
Photojournalist
(Photojournalist)
Stavanger , Norway
fototaker, freelance photographer fototaker
freelance photographer
(Tony Lee)
Rota , Spain ( SVQ )
Ninfa Bito, Ninfa Bito
Manila , Philippines
Emanuel Ferretti, Emanuel Ferretti
Barcelona , Spain
Ilker Gurer, Photographer Ilker Gurer
Photographer
(Freelance Photographer)
Istanbul , Turkey
Sarah Van den Elsken, Photojournalist Sarah Van den Elsken
Photojournalist
Antwerpen , Belgium
Dave Yoder, Dave Yoder
Milan , Italy
Paul  Treacy, Photographer Paul Treacy
Photographer
(Photohumourist)
London , United Kingdom ( LGW )
Ewa Chmielowska, project coordinator Ewa Chmielowska
project coordinator
Cracow , Poland
Kim Karpeles, Photographer Kim Karpeles
Photographer
(Pixel Chicago)
Belize , Belize
vera mulyani, director film making vera mulyani
director film making
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