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Photo Programs for Starters

Hey, my name is Aaron Patton, age 17. I am starting out on photography and work freelance for the Chilliwack Times newspaper.

I am wondering what programs you recommend for photo editing, processing, and filing. I am on a tight budget however.

Thanks in advance for the help.

by Aaron Patton at 2006-04-23 20:15:58 UTC (ed. Apr 11 2008 ) Chilliwack , Canada | Bookmark | | Report spam→

Adobe Elements. It’s not expensive and does a whole damn lot. Once you get used to it, you’ll be able to switch to Photoshop CS without much difficulty as it works in much the same way. Also, Elements comes supplied with all sorts of hardware, scanners and the like. You might also talk with some of your colleagues or even the satff at your paper and see if they can sort you out with a copy of Photoshop. The picture desk will most likely have a multiple license version. No harm is asking at least. Good luck.

by Paul Treacy | 23 Apr 2006 20:04 | NYC, United States | | Report spam→
Right now I do have Photoshop CS2 but don’t use it often since I don’t know all the features yet. I use Bridge to go through my photos and add the meta tags and everything.

Just seeing if there is anything better.

Thanks for the reply. :)

by Aaron Patton | 23 Apr 2006 20:04 | Chilliwack, Canada | | Report spam→
There is no better. Dont waste your money. You can get iView or Photo Mechanic to complement what you have, but otherwise you are in pretty good shape. There are plenty of things out there, but a photographer should go slow and not overspend on one’s overhead.

by Jon Anderson | 23 Apr 2006 20:04 | Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic | | Report spam→
Ok. Thanks everyone!

by Aaron Patton | 23 Apr 2006 21:04 | Chilliwack, Canada | | Report spam→
Just in case you have not heard about Picasa, from Google. It may not be the best program for editing, but if you want to have a friendly filing program, you should try it. Oh, by the way… it’s completely free !! (http://picasa.google.com/)

Jorge Martinez

by Jorge Martinez Morales | 01 May 2006 21:05 | Mexico City, Mexico | | Report spam→
Aaron,
Try photo mechanic. You can download a free trial (actually, they require that you try it before you buy it). It’s really the way to go and is very reasonably priced.

And not to spam you, but you should consider entering some of your photos to a Web site photo contest I’m working for. It’s called WeSay.com and we’ll be launching later this spring. The contest is open now, though, and is free to enter. We’ll publish your name and photo too. It’s a national site so the exposure will be good for photographers like yourself.

by Jason Geil | 10 Apr 2008 18:04 | Chicago, United States | | Report spam→
Here’ the link:
http://www.wesay.com

by Jason Geil | 10 Apr 2008 18:04 (ed. Apr 10 2008) | Chicago, United States | | Report spam→
i wish i took photos when i was 17…

by sbramin | 10 Apr 2008 23:04 | Vancouver, Canada | | Report spam→
i wish i was 17

by Con O'Donoghue | 11 Apr 2008 11:04 | Barcelona, Spain | | Report spam→
My advice is to concentrate on the basics, and that would be CS3 and Bridge. If you’re a student you can get the academic pricing online at http://www.adobe.com/education/purchasing/qualify.html
The price on that is $299 US.

Or, sometimes through your school. Or ex-school. :)

Seriously, Photoshop is the language we speak, like it or not, and you simply MUST learn it. Elements is fine for a start, and more worth your time than other programs, but the academic pricing for CS3 makes it well worth the cost.

by [former member] | 11 Apr 2008 11:04 (ed. Apr 11 2008) | boston, ma, United States | | Report spam→
Your RAW converter program that comes with your camera, Photo Mechanic is the bomb and for final touches PS Elements 6 (has bridge).

Good luck,

Raoul

by Raoul Kramer | 11 Apr 2008 12:04 | in the, Netherlands | | Report spam→
let me second or third or fourth PhotoMechanic! fantastic, aaron.

when i do newspaper work, it’s what i use to quickly sift through my takes, rate them, and export to Lightroom for edit. it’s not expensive, light on your system, and if you need to do anything like resize or convert to b&w, you can use photoshop.

photomechanic —> lightroom —> cs2

quick and effective. and they all read each others metadata info, which is a blessing.

by [former member] | 11 Apr 2008 12:04 | Philadelphia, United States | | Report spam→
This was posted two years ago. His websites don’t even work anymore.

by [former member] | 11 Apr 2008 16:04 | Anaheim, CA, United States | | Report spam→
ha, didn’t even notice that….

…better late than never?

iman, i will email you tonight. sorry, just been a bit overstretched!

by [former member] | 11 Apr 2008 16:04 | Philadelphia, United States | | Report spam→
LOL 2 year old post…I missed that, too.

Re: the contest referenced..from the contest rules:
“By entering a photograph in the Contest, whether or not it is eligible to win, you also are submitting the photograph and its accompanying description to WeSay.com review and approval pursuant to its Content Submission Agreement. In particular, you will be granting WeSay.com a royalty free, worldwide nonexclusive, nonterminable, perpetual license to display your photograph on WeSay.com. You will be required to indicate your review and acceptance of WeSay.com’s Content Submission Agreement as a condition of entering your photograph in the Contest. If this is not acceptable, do not attempt to enter your photograph.”

And:

“By entering the Contest you also acknowledge and agree that your entry becomes available for display by WeSay.com. You also grant to WeSay.com the right to use and publish your name, likeness, photo, and photo title and description, both electronically (for example, on the Internet) and in print, in connection with the Contest at any time, except to the extent prohibited by law. By accepting a prize, you further acknowledge and agree that WeSay.com may use, without additional compensation, your name, likeness, photo, and photo title and description, for purposes of advertising, trade, and promotion, except to the extent prohibited by law. WeSay.com also reserves the right to use any and all information related to the Contest, including information submitted by you, in any manner permitted by the Policies.”

Even worse, from the submission form:
5.(B): “You also waive any so called moral rights in the Content including the right to be named and credited as its creator. We, however, will use reasonable efforts to ensure that you are credited as the creator of the Content with each use made of them, but you recognize and agree that may not be reasonably possible for us to do so. You agree that we may make such changes and additions to the Content as we deem necessary or appropriate.”

and:

“6. Our License in and Exploitation of Content Submitted by You.

(A) In return for allowing you to submit Content to the Site, you agree that we shall have a royalty free, worldwide nonexclusive, nonterminable, perpetual license to display your Content on the Site and that we are entitled to edit, modify or adapt the Content for display. You hereby grant us all copyright, moral, and other intellectual property rights in submitted Content required by us to display your Content and to edit, modify or adapt your Content for display.

(B) We shall be entitled to exploit the rights we have in any Content submitted by you in any way we deem reasonable. We act as a principal on our own account and not as agent for you or any other person. You agree that we may use your Content for promotional purposes, including but not limited to print or web publication in direct relation to media articles about us or the Site.

© We will not compensate you in any manner for our use of Content submitted by you or for exploitation of the rights in your submitted Content which you have granted us. In particular, and without in any way limiting the foregoing, you shall not be entitled to any share of user fees, advertising revenues, or other income or consideration of any kind generated by the Site."

Even though I’m an amateur, no, thank you.

I’d suggest the organizers check out http://www.pro-imaging.org/content/view/177/132/

Of course, based on the legally well-written forms and agreements, it appears they know exactly what they are doing.

A.

by Andrew Brinkhorst | 11 Apr 2008 18:04 (ed. Apr 11 2008) | Lexington, KY, United States | | Report spam→
Andrew,
I worked for several years as a staff photographer of a daily newspaper. Actually, where I worked was only about 90 minutes up the road from you in Lexington.
I have entered my work in several photo contests.
What do you have to lose? As you said, you’re an amateur photographer. It takes 30 seconds to submit a photo to the contest. The rules are pretty general when it comes to photo contests and are in place simply to keep the site from getting sued. I work for the site and I can promise you, there is no intent to abuse the rights of any photographer or photograph.

by Jason Geil | 11 Apr 2008 18:04 | Chicago, United States | | Report spam→
Hi Jason,

I completely understand and agree with the need to protect the site and organizers from lawsuits. And I have no problems with granting limited rights to contests so that the images can be used to promote the contest, site, or future contests.

But even as a rank amateur, I’m not comfortable with entering contests in which unlimited rights are granted in perpetuity. Just doesn’t feel right to me. Maybe I’m just old and paranoid – I am an info security professional in my “real” job, so paranoia is part of the package ;)

On a different note, I get to Chicago and Cincy pretty regularly, next time I’m up there drop you a note and maybe we can get together – would love to hear about shooting in Cincinnati – I went to school at UC.

A.

by Andrew Brinkhorst | 11 Apr 2008 18:04 | Lexington, KY, United States | | Report spam→
I completely understand. I have been trying to hammer this point home here and I think our lawyers are working to draft a better policy. We really want to be a place for amateurs, students, pros and anyone else to post images without any fear of losing the rights.
I promise you, as long as I work for this company, we will not take advantage of anyone’s rights as a photographer.
Go Bearcats and please do look me up if you are in Chicago.

by Jason Geil | 11 Apr 2008 18:04 | Chicago, United States | | Report spam→
there is no good excuse for these types of licenses other then a desire to be able to take something for nothing.

thread about a similar issue just today http://www.lightstalkers.org/adobe-photoshop-express-license

and lots in the past about back handed contests.

if the company has no intentions of wrong doings then they do they have to ask for such rights.

by sbramin | 11 Apr 2008 19:04 | Vancouver, Canada | | Report spam→
If it was that simple, we would. Again, I’m pressing this issue. Even opening here in a forum like this. It’s lawyer speak. They are trying to keep the business from getting sued.
I agree, everyone wants something for nothing these days. WeSay.com simply wants to be an open forum. A collection of photos every day that in some small way represents what’s going on around us all. Novices. Amateurs. Students. Pros. You post your photos on Lightstalkers. So do I. It serves a purpose. In the meantime, we will continue to work to ensure people who visit and post to our site, are not treated unfairly.

by Jason Geil | 11 Apr 2008 19:04 | Chicago, United States | | Report spam→
Jason, have you considered submitting your contest and submission rules to the website in my original post?

My take is that they have been building a good rep and actually will work with organizers to help identify and offer alternative language to remove some of the stickier rights issues.

As far as posting on LS, the rights terms are decidedly different:
“We claim no intellectual property rights over the material you provide to the lightstalkers.org service. Your profile and materials uploaded remain yours. You can remove your profile at any time by emailing a request to support@lightstalkers.org. This will also hide any private images you have stored in the system. However, by uploading your images, you agree to allow other lightstalkers.org users to view and share your images and you therefore agree to allow us to display and store them.”

On top of that, my personal opinion is that LS exercises due diligence in displaying images by using Flash and automatically posting a copyright with my name in the image viewer.

If your organization truly wants to “be a place for amateurs, students, pros and anyone else to post images without any fear of losing the rights” then there is no place in the agreements for phrases like “you agree that we shall have a royalty free, worldwide nonexclusive, nonterminable, perpetual license to display your Content on the Site and that we are entitled to edit, modify or adapt the Content for display. You hereby grant us all copyright, moral, and other intellectual property rights in submitted Content required by us to display your Content and to edit, modify or adapt your Content for display.”

I like the concept and your stated goal. I just think you’re really going to be fighting an uphill battle to convince people who read and understand submission clauses like that to submit.

by Andrew Brinkhorst | 11 Apr 2008 19:04 (ed. Apr 11 2008) | Lexington, KY, United States | | Report spam→
Andrew,
The rules for this contest are different than the rules that will apply to the actual site. We want the right to run the photos entered into the contest on the site when we launch. That’s why we have the rules as they are now.
However, we’re working to make things extremely user friendly. We’ll get there, but working with lawyers on this issue is tricky. I think you will notice a vast difference between the legal language on the contest site and our actual site.

by Jason Geil | 11 Apr 2008 19:04 | Chicago, United States | | Report spam→
I know how it can be working with legal ;)

I like the way Adobe recently admitted they were trying to preserve rights to do things they truly never had intention of doing with their website, and took those parts out – you might point your legal team at that instance.

Good luck with things – and please keep us posted. I think that as photographers we need to push the envelope as more and more digital images become available, and paper press diminishes. I was amazed the other day in SF where the torch relay was supposed to go by the number of pro (Canon 1DS) and prosumer (30/40Ds) cameras in the hands of amateurs….

Looking at the video Paul posted earlier, could the right to bear cameras become the next battle?

by Andrew Brinkhorst | 11 Apr 2008 19:04 | Lexington, KY, United States | | Report spam→

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Participants

Aaron Patton, Student / Photographer Aaron Patton
Student / Photographer
(Freelance Photojournalist)
Chilliwack , Canada
Paul  Treacy, Photographer Paul Treacy
Photographer
(Photohumourist)
London , United Kingdom ( LGW )
Jon Anderson, Photographer & Writer Jon Anderson
Photographer & Writer
Ocala Florida , United States
Jorge Martinez Morales, Photographer Jorge Martinez Morales
Photographer
Mexico City , Mexico
Jason Geil, Photojournalism Jason Geil
Photojournalism
Chicago, Il , United States
sbramin, flaneur sbramin
flaneur
London , United Kingdom ( LHR )
Con O'Donoghue, Photographer Con O'Donoghue
Photographer
Dublin , Ireland
Raoul Kramer, photographer Raoul Kramer
photographer
[undisclosed location].
Andrew Brinkhorst, photographer Andrew Brinkhorst
photographer
Lexington, Ky , United States


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