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Recommended Boots. What do you wear?

For about the last six or seven years I have been wearing U.S. Army issue combat boots. First I wore the old style black combats most recently I have a pair the brown desert boots. I preferred the the new combats over the older style because the did not have the social hangups that the older black combats had being a civilian in the US. I have been wearing them for about three years now and I am thinking maybe it is time to replace them. So what do you wear? I am looking for some thing that I can wear every day but if I brush them off I can wear them to business casual meetings or for interviews. But I would like them durable so that they will last at least a year. Normally I would grab a new pair of the combats but I am thinking that I would like to start traveling outside of the west. Don’t know if that would bring me even more attention then wondering around like a dumb-stuck fool. Would American combats stand out in a place like Korea or India? Any help is appreciated.

by Tim Hodge at 2008-12-29 04:11:28 UTC Wilmington, NC , United States | Bookmark | | Report spam→

tim,

try Ecco shoes: http://www.eccousa.com/shoes/mens/outdoor/63/product-list.aspx

i wear north face boots but i am not anyone to dispense fashion advice. i think North Face is worth a look, Ecco, and maybe Patagonia? if you’re going to be wearing loose pants, then with boots that are plain brown or black, with little to no logos, you’ll be aces.

by [former member] | 29 Dec 2008 06:12 (ed. Dec 29 2008) | Philadelphia, United States | | Report spam→
Try hiking boots with Gore-tex lining and Vibram outsole for waterproofing and durability. There are so many brands and styles to choose from. I get mine from sierratradingpost.com because they offer deep discounts and it’s easy to return stuff if it turns out it doesn’t suit you. I own Vasque, Aku, North Face and Lowa brand shoes. They’re all good but sometimes I have problems with the insole, a problem I solve with orthotic insoles available in any Walgreens or Rite-Aid stores.

by Max Pasion | 29 Dec 2008 06:12 (ed. Dec 29 2008) | Bayonne, NJ, United States | | Report spam→
Red ones they make me run faster

by Imants | 29 Dec 2008 08:12 | "The Boneyard 017º", Australia | | Report spam→
I don’t really think wearing right kind of boots would be sufficient to disguise you for a local in Korea or India

Cheers

Petr

by Petr Antonov | 29 Dec 2008 12:12 (ed. Dec 29 2008) | Moscow, Russia | | Report spam→
i wear simple canvas shoes, they cost about usd 6.00 a pair but i find i do my best work if i can work bare foot. what is it with photogs, big boots and cameras… j.

ps my ones are greenish

by John Robinson | 29 Dec 2008 12:12 | around, South Africa | | Report spam→
Wear whatever is most comfortable for you. As Petr said, I hardly think that “standing out” in Korea or India is a matter of the boots you wear, unless you’re already Korean or Indian…

by Martin Mraz | 29 Dec 2008 12:12 | Prague, Czech Republic | | Report spam→
There was a trend for photographers in the UK to wear big boots a while back. Usually Timberland or Doc Martens.
These days the Doc Martens are made over in China rather than just down the road from where I live :-(

Like Mustafah says, Ecco’s are a good choice for smart casual that will also cope with standing in puddles, etc
I’ve found the soles aren’t as grippy as vibram ones though.

If you don’t mind looking like Crocodile Dundee, you could always get a pair of gecko-skin boots!

by JR, (John Watts-Robertson). | 29 Dec 2008 12:12 | | Report spam→
Asolo boots for me, have the same ones for years, vibram outsole and leather or gore-tex available.

by Fabien Penso | 29 Dec 2008 13:12 | Paris, France | | Report spam→
as for standing out in korea and india, as soon as you touch down out side the west, learn some language, brush up on culture don’t wear us of a brand clothing. when you carry a camera you will stand out, but making local friends where you work will provide a support base and help in getting a better understanding of the material that you came to shoot though. pm me if you want me to go on… bestest j.

by John Robinson | 29 Dec 2008 13:12 | around, South Africa | | Report spam→
Scarpa is a great brand, they last for years…

by [former member] | 29 Dec 2008 15:12 | Brooklyn, United States | | Report spam→
I swear by my Mephistos. They’re kind of expensive (150-300) at first but they last forever and you can get them refurbished by the factory for around $70, which basically gives you a brand new, broken-in, pair of shoes. I have a few pairs with Gore-Tex linings. Very comfortable too.

by James Colburn | 29 Dec 2008 15:12 | McAllen, Texas, United States | | Report spam→
When traveling and working I often wear boots made by a company named Magnum (http://www.magnumboots.com/us/index.asp ). They are oriented to police and rescue personnel, but can look more like Doc Maartens when one does not look too close. Mine are waterproof black leather, with about a six-inch rise, and have Vibram-style soles.

They have the advantages of the the higher-tech combat boot you see some soldiers wearing, but they can be polished up and look OK under a pair of khakis. They give good ankle support in all kinds of situations and are light enough to allow climbing and working on tricky surfaces. I just returned from northern Minnesota where, with gaiters, I wore then moving about in in 2+ feet of new snow and strapped snowshoes onto them in deeper stuff.

They will never make you look at home in India, and probably not in Korea either. However, the company sells these around the world, so you might see some Asian cops or rescue workers in them.

by [former member] | 29 Dec 2008 15:12 (ed. Dec 30 2008) | Washington, DC, United States | | Report spam→
All the above brands sound foot worthy. On a recent assignment, I packed in a hurry and brought the wrong shoes, a pair of Romeos that have side elastic, are comfy but have zero support. Fortunately, I was in NYC. I wound up getting some New Balance sneakers adding orthopedic soles and that saved me. I recommend carrying two pairs, different brands and constructions. One a serious support boot, the other a high end sandal or sneaker (with ortho support), changing in the evening or alternating days, gives your feet a break.

by Joel Sackett | 29 Dec 2008 16:12 (ed. Dec 29 2008) | Puget Sound, Washington, United States | | Report spam→
But, Neal, with your Magnum military-spec boots, how do you convince people that you are not a Blackwater contractor?

by [former member] | 29 Dec 2008 16:12 | New York, United States | | Report spam→
If your strictly looking for military style boots, I recommend these Danners (http://www.uscav.com/Productinfo.aspx?productID=8772&TabID=1&CatID=386). They also come in a temperate model too if your going to be some place cool or cold. The wide sole is great for ankle stability. I’ve been wearing them for about 3 years now, held up great and can’t remember the last time I rolled my ankle while wearing them.

On that same site, www.uscav.com, they have pages of combat boots – many that aren’t too military looking too.

by Steve Orcutt | 29 Dec 2008 17:12 | Havelock, NC, United States | | Report spam→
wonder what hcb wore when he was out there being a pj? j.

by John Robinson | 29 Dec 2008 17:12 | around, South Africa | | Report spam→
>>wonder what hcb wore when he was out there being a pj? j. <<

Paraboot and Galibier(hiking in this last case).

by Daniel Legendre | 29 Dec 2008 17:12 (ed. Dec 29 2008) | Paris, France | | Report spam→
I would bet it’s something that caused enough discomfort to keep him awake and able to catch the guy in mid-jump over a puddle, among others.

by Max Pasion | 29 Dec 2008 17:12 (ed. Dec 29 2008) | Bayonne, NJ, United States | | Report spam→
and that was the pic that he had to crop… j.

by John Robinson | 29 Dec 2008 17:12 | around, South Africa | | Report spam→
Otherwise, Caterpillars

by Daniel Legendre | 29 Dec 2008 18:12 | Paris, France | | Report spam→
i just went onto the www.uscav.com site… i did not know that there were so many us military style boots on sale! but i think that i will stick to being a canvas sand shoes and or bare foot pj. bestest to all you booted ones… j.

by John Robinson | 29 Dec 2008 18:12 | around, South Africa | | Report spam→
HAHAAAA not this old chestnut… I remember practically the exact same thread starting up a few years ago, woooo way back when I first joined Lightstalkers!!! I still reckon it was the longest thread EVER, so popular it was! Indeed, what boots……… well, I know a lot of you good ol’ boys like your combat-type boots for your good ol’ combat-type situations, but really let’s be sensible about this… there can only be one, the great Australian workboot with the very loyal and global following for good reason: BLUNDSTONE BOOTS www.blundstone.com Actually, another Australian bootmaker RM Williams (itself with stores in places like London – back of Regent St somewhere) makes a much better & longer wearing version of the Blundstone-type workboot, my farmer brother-in-law swears by them. BUT, the Blundstones are very CHEAP and last a fair while anyway. RM Williams make jaw-dropping dress boots, can’t beat them for that. Yes Daniel, Paraboot have always been good boots but they don’t make this one particular old style that I like anymore!

by Paul KISS | 29 Dec 2008 18:12 | Melbourne, Australia | | Report spam→
I have a feeling that scarves will somehow sneak into the conversation, this thread being about PJ fashion. Maybe even the M8 as well.

by Max Pasion | 29 Dec 2008 18:12 | Bayonne, NJ, United States | | Report spam→
Burberrys or Combat M6 vest ? -:)

by Daniel Legendre | 29 Dec 2008 18:12 | Paris, France | | Report spam→
I agree Max. the M8 as a bling bling. lol.

try Magnum Boots. or if you want a boots will not stand out anywhere, as Daniel said -CATERPILLARS or any working/construction boots would do, the one being sold in hardwares.

by Buck Pago | 29 Dec 2008 19:12 | | Report spam→
Caterpillar web site

http://www.catfootwear.com/Explore/en/

by Daniel Legendre | 29 Dec 2008 19:12 | Paris, France | | Report spam→
The prior source of high intelligence on this subject was here: http://www.lightstalkers.org/what_bots_do_you_like. It was started by none other than Eros Hoagland.

BTW, you can’t really tell the difference between my Magnums and the Caterpillars unless you look closely. Danners are really military-looking, and the Special Forces wore Oakley, which were a dead giveaway.

And, Preston, if a subject is the type that will know enough about hired gun footgear to think that one might be a Blackwater guy, there should be a negotiation with them in advance.

I wish I was back in DC so I could quote the hilarious comments from the book Shutterbabe about the dress of photogs in the former Yugoslavia during the early 90s. I recall that footgear was one of the subjects that she seemed to think was correlated by nationality, education, class, age, etc.

by [former member] | 29 Dec 2008 20:12 | Washington, DC, United States | | Report spam→
Neal, perhaps it’s time to update the proper dress code.

Clearly, special ops footwear is a must. The scarf goes without saying, but a checkered kaffiyeh seems more au courant. Ball cap for the sun. Wraparound shades on a Croakie. Jeans (because James Nachtwey wore them in “War Photographer”). Synthetic travel shirt with large pockets, worn with sleeves rolled. Shoulder bag of ballistic nylon. Handheld GPS unit in clip on belt.

by [former member] | 29 Dec 2008 21:12 | New York, United States | | Report spam→
I wear scarves on my feet… ;-)

by J-F Vergel | 29 Dec 2008 23:12 | Bennington, VT, United States | | Report spam→
Nachtwey is a great photographer, but not very practical PJ-fashionwise. If I were him in the situations he shot in, I would take a cue from those mountain hikers and adopt their nylon fashion. Cotton, as jeans are made of, would not only be hot and sticky in the summer, it is also bulky and soaks up water and not really a wise choice during the other three seasons. I would estimate that you could pack three nylon or Gore-tex cargo pants in place of one pair of jeans in a backpack. And in place of keffiyeh, which could get tangled up with equipment, try Buff.

by Max Pasion | 29 Dec 2008 23:12 (ed. Dec 29 2008) | Bayonne, NJ, United States | | Report spam→
nactwy deliberately dresses in a way that looks non threatening in the situations he gets himself into, one of the many many reasons he is so damn good. for boots, anything made by Merrel are fantastic. i have 2 pairs of them!

by Tyler Cacek | 30 Dec 2008 00:12 | Columbia, Missouri, United States | | Report spam→
i try and model my footwear after this



by sbramin | 30 Dec 2008 00:12 (ed. Dec 30 2008) | ottawa, Canada | | Report spam→
for general use- these cant be beat for price, comfort, durability and looks…
http://www.leatherup.com/p/Mens-Motorcycle-Boots/Mens-X-Element-Short-Harness-Motorcycle-Boot/41914.html

(Ive used them on multiple continents, from fiormal more dress situation- to hiking, protests, street and slum work, etc. Awesome, cheap, comfortable- in black or brown. Shine-able by those dudes on the street…

for hardcore outdoor stuff- alot of hiking, climbing, wilderness work-
http://www.sportiva.com/products/prod/239
(these will last for a decade or more, are burly as hell, made by a major Italian bootmaker, and have tens of thousands of miles of trail experience in the design)

for summers, the tropics, casual use, etc- http://chacousa.com/Portal.aspx?CN=BDD282CF7BB2&MN=0BB282DB738F

(Ive used these for multiple summers in Latin America and India, often taking them as my only pair of footwear for a month out or more- way better then Tevas).

lastly, some running shoes rule, throw them in your pack and they will get you thru most situations that boots would, with half the weight and easy to pack)…

Wearing nylon is great- unless you are embedded, then youll want ultra light merino wool (like Icebreaker or Ibex) or cotton underclothes- all natural under your body armor, since if you get hit, the heat will melt the nylon clothes straight to your body. Not fun to peel off…

though generally, dark colors, conservative looking blacks, greys, blues, browns, from the outdoor stores like REI, MEC, Altrec, etc do well socially- from dirt to dilettante- are easy to hand wash and dry, can be shoved into a pack for weeks on end, and will last forever. Think Patagonia, Arcteryx, Marmot, Icebreaker, Cloudveil, Carhartt, Colombia, etc. And never pay full price- plenty of spots online to get amazing deals on great gear and clothing…

by [former member] | 30 Dec 2008 02:12 | Salt Lake City, United States | | Report spam→
George needs some more fishes…
On the foot note I recommend the HAIX models : http://www.haix.com/eng/products_en.php Check the ‘law enforcement’, ‘workwear’ and ‘outdoor’ sections.

by Frederic Harster | 30 Dec 2008 03:12 | Strasbourg, France | | Report spam→
Ok but what I really want to know is has ANYONE here actually had a Korean or Vietnamese or Indian or whatever point at their American combat boots and go, “Ha! You’re an evil American! I’m not talking to you!”? Anyone?
Tobie

by BignoseTW | 30 Dec 2008 03:12 | Taipei, Taiwan | | Report spam→
Thanks everyone. This was really helpful and now I know a more than I did before. I think a pair of red sneakers are going in to my pack so I’m faster. :)

by Tim Hodge | 30 Dec 2008 05:12 | Wilmington, NC, United States | | Report spam→
hahaha.lol. good one Tim. you got me. lol

by Buck Pago | 30 Dec 2008 05:12 | | Report spam→
I learned a thing or two myself. Molten nylon on your skin would give you more pain on top of the bullet wound. So put on a huge swath of cotton in form of a shirt and jeans, etc. It makes sense indeed when covering potentially bloody situations.

Btw, as a photography/PJ forum, I don’t think we should necessarily confine ourselves to cameras and photography techniques and ethics and news and stuff. The kind of clothes one wears to work is not odd as it is something basic too. I’m sure carpenters talk about gloves and bibs as much as we talk here about boots.

by Max Pasion | 30 Dec 2008 05:12 | Bayonne, NJ, United States | | Report spam→
i have found cheap canvas shoes as above, full length second skin lycra leggings under a kikoi sarong with a cheap “made in china” tee shirt works for me on a hot day! if you add to this a checkered kaffiyeh or non us of america scarve you should be able to differ from the blackwater wannabes. you also WILL get a smile and a laugh from the local people!

ps a camera or two will just finish off the the look for the semi casual business meeting.

oh just a thought, give your eyes a good hard rub, it will give you the just back from the front line look as in the movie salvador! this way you should be a hit with all the girls too… j.

by John Robinson | 30 Dec 2008 08:12 | around, South Africa | | Report spam→
George “Funky’ Brown, like I said in my post this ain’t the first time a thread about boots has popped up… first time was ages ago and many of the great, good, magnificent, holier than thou and handsome among us had the good humor to contribute. Why, even Bruno Stevens is a self-confessed Blundstone boot fan! I’m sure if you watch ‘War Photographer’ just a few more times, maybe another 15 times (what’s another 15 times after all?!), you might be able to ascertain what boots the star himself wears.

by Paul KISS | 30 Dec 2008 10:12 | Melbourne, Australia | | Report spam→
Blundstones and M8.

Bling. Bling.

And don’t forget the scarf.

B.

;-)

by [former member] | 30 Dec 2008 15:12 | GAZA, Occupied Palestinian Territory | | Report spam→
Try Pikolinos.
They should meet all of the needs you stated.

by Finn | 30 Dec 2008 16:12 | Hudson Valley, United States | | Report spam→
http://blog.magnumphotos.com/2008/11/wear_good_shoes_advice_to_young_photographers.html

Cheers

Petr



by Petr Antonov | 30 Dec 2008 17:12 (ed. Dec 30 2008) | Moscow, Russia | | Report spam→
See! You should wear good boots…. just like your mum used to tell you to wear clean underwear when you go out in case you have an accident. It’s elementary.

by Paul KISS | 30 Dec 2008 18:12 | Melbourne, Australia | | Report spam→
Merrill Continuum will be the LAST shoe you ever purchase.

by Nick Morris | 30 Dec 2008 20:12 | San Diego CA, United States | | Report spam→
I swear by these boots. The Merrell Phaser Peak.

http://www.merrell.com/US/Product/NZGP/Mens-Active-Footwear/Hiking/Mens/Phaser-Peak-Waterproof.aspx

I’m out in the field pretty often with soldiers and between their boots and mine, I’d take these any day of the week. Gore tex keeps the water out, the bottom tread is amazing, and they are durable as hell.

by Phil Sussman | 31 Dec 2008 00:12 | Tacoma, Washington, United States | | Report spam→
anyway fuck all that, just wear some flip-flops.

by Paul KISS | 31 Dec 2008 02:12 | Melbourne, Australia | | Report spam→

……..a pair of thongs (to non Australians……… stuff for feet not the bum crack)

by Imants | 31 Dec 2008 02:12 (ed. Dec 31 2008) | "The Boneyard 017º", Australia | | Report spam→
it’s curious that no one mentioned this.. in asia,
you have to take off your shoes/boots all the time, going
into homes and many shops. a pair of boots you can pull
on and off will make you a lot happier, instead of laces
which get annoying after a short while. a pair of zippy
white go-go boots would be lovely though.

by julia s. ferdinand | 31 Dec 2008 07:12 | chiang mai, Thailand | | Report spam→
I’m a great fan of flip-flops (a triumph of design) but they can be dangerous – one little slip in the dark on the path home and you have really messed up your foot, one rusty upward-pointing nail in the undergrowth and you are in trouble… Now reserved for holidays. Something far more solid for work…

by DPC | 31 Dec 2008 08:12 | Paris, France | | Report spam→
It’s all clear about the boots, but what laces would you guys recommend? Anyone had experience stuffing them with wires as I know some do with camera straps? And most important: which laces would help a pale-skinned photog pretend a buddy in a crowd of Africans?

by [former member] | 31 Dec 2008 18:12 | Moscow, Russia | | Report spam→
The Asian/Middle Eastern no-shoes-inside culture that Julia mentions does indeed present an issue of convenience when wearing over-the-ankle boots. But wait! My favorite brand, Magnum, has a solution. You can buy several models with zippers on the side! See, for example, http://www.magnumboots.com/us/prod/5226.asp The zipper also helps when going through airport security lines where you have to take off and put on your footgear. The zipper reduces the water protection somewhat, but, hey, life is full of compromises.

by [former member] | 31 Dec 2008 22:12 (ed. Dec 31 2008) | Washington, DC, United States | | Report spam→
I use a Salomon trail shoes, are light and resistant. are made for walking ;D

by Alberto Rey | 02 Jan 2009 20:01 (ed. Jan 2 2009) | Huelva, Spain | | Report spam→
Magnum boots http://www.magnumboots.com/us/prod/5224.asp Very good stuff and looks casual…

by [former member] | 02 Jan 2009 23:01 | Paris, France | | Report spam→
those are nifty boots with the zips, Neal. too bad
they don’t make them small enough.

by julia s. ferdinand | 03 Jan 2009 05:01 | chiang mai, Thailand | | Report spam→
“I’m sure carpenters talk about gloves and bibs as much as we talk here about boots.” ….nah we drank piss with the labourers and talked shit!

by Imants | 03 Jan 2009 06:01 | "The Boneyard 017º", Australia | | Report spam→
Julia, do you wear something smaller than size 5? Magnum has a women’s 6 inch zip boot that goes down to that size. http://www.magnumboots.com/us/prod/5185.asp

Maybe Magnum the boot company could get a sponsorship deal with Magnum the photo agency. :-)



by [former member] | 03 Jan 2009 15:01 | Washington, DC, United States | | Report spam→
looky there. assumed (wrongly) they were only mens shoes. and they are black. not purple or pink. though not sure i
can give up my dm’s even for zips.

did wonder if Magnum was diversifying into gear.

by julia s. ferdinand | 03 Jan 2009 19:01 | chiang mai, Thailand | | Report spam→
“Ok but what I really want to know is has ANYONE here actually had a Korean or Vietnamese or Indian or whatever point at their American combat boots and go, “Ha! You’re an evil American! I’m not talking to you!”?


couldn’t say about korea or vietnam but i wouldn’t go around wearing caterpillars in the west bank. MAJOR brand problem in palestine… (timberland as well)

by david sutherland | 04 Jan 2009 00:01 (ed. Jan 4 2009) | London, United Kingdom | | Report spam→
I will second the Merrell’s. I like these, they slip on well. http://www.merrell.com/US/Product/NZGP/Mens-Active-Footwear/Multi-Sport/Mens/Chameleon-Hex.aspx

I have owned about 5 pairs of Merrell’s over the years. They work great. I need to wear orthodic inserts and these work the best.

I got the best piece of advice from the late Joe DeVera who I knew when I interned at the Detroit News in the mid 1990s. “You never know when you gotta run.” Which is why he wore baggier jeans, and a pair of Timberlands. He scoffed at my Dr. Martens. I switched to Merrells not long after I had to run in a pair of Dr. Martens.

I have tried Blundstones, but I keep coming back to the Merrells.

by Tom Leininger | 04 Jan 2009 03:01 | Denton, TX, United States | | Report spam→
Go to the work wear section of any large chain store (Kmart, Target, Big W etc. They have boots and joggers that have steel toecaps and sole plates for protection on construction sites etc. The joggers look like Columbia ones and are quite presentable. They are cheap and presentable enough.
The Army have just changed their authorised tactical military and police footwear. The low rise law enforcement shoes are very presentable but are full mil spec.
See: http://www.kitbag.com.au/category10_1.htm

by Stephen Asprey | 16 Jan 2009 00:01 | Sydney, Australia | | Report spam→
Does anyone use a Luigi case for her or his Leica?

by Barry Milyovsky | 16 Jan 2009 02:01 | | Report spam→
No, but I have a Luigi jock strap….

by [former member] | 16 Jan 2009 02:01 | Washington, DC, United States | | Report spam→
I understand it is best not to use a Luigi in developing countries. “Conspicuous consumption,” and all that sort of thing. But, if you keep it under your pants I suppose it is a different story.

by Barry Milyovsky | 16 Jan 2009 03:01 | | Report spam→
a used pakistani basmati rice bag does it for me… j.

ps is this post starting up again no! no! please…

by John Robinson | 16 Jan 2009 10:01 | around, South Africa | | Report spam→
Nah you want some GSG-9 Adidas Tactical boots as mentioned by William Gibson in Spook Country http://www.wired.com/culture/culturereviews/magazine/15-08/pl_print

by John Carolan | 16 Jan 2009 16:01 | Shetland, United Kingdom | | Report spam→
Hahaha! Can’t believe this! Dude, socks are important too! How many pairs do you have? How often do you change them?
On a serious note, the ZWELGHGR-086/+7459-gj5 high insulation-morning-plus-double-cheese-BOOTS feel pretty good on my in-grown-toed-feet! Check them out!

by Jerome Favre | 18 Jan 2009 14:01 | Hong Kong, Hong Kong | | Report spam→
Keens. Lightweight, comfortable, waterproof and not to flashy.

by Paul Nelson | 25 Jan 2009 23:01 | Barrie, Ontario, Canada | | Report spam→
Just to cover as many situations as possible I wear a heavy duty combat boot on one foot and a tennis shoe on the other.

by Barry Milyovsky | 26 Jan 2009 00:01 | lost in the, United States | | Report spam→
anybody tried the MBT shoes ? http://fr.swissmasai.ch/Default.aspx?lang=fr-CH

by Heimana | 26 Jan 2009 17:01 | Brussels, Belgium | | Report spam→
Suggest you try John Lobb next time you are in London. The address is 9 St James’ Street. www.johnlobbltd.co.uk

If they have nothing to suit, they will custom make anything you desire……;-) Perhaps a hollow heel to hide that Minox in in case of capture by the enemy?

by Marcus Adams | 27 Jan 2009 01:01 | wellington, New Zealand | | Report spam→
For Korea, weather is like where you are and more humid in summer, and Koreas’ winters are like standing on Blowing Rock or Howard’s Knob in Boone. Cold and humid. In Korea, you always take off shoes/boots when you enter most restaurants and especially when you enter a home…so you quickly tire of laces. Dress for ther weather and terrain…don’t sweat the fashion statement. If you want another pr of shoes for dress, you can find some easy once you’re there and know your situation. Ted

by Ted Engelmann | 28 Jan 2009 07:01 | Denver, United States | | Report spam→
Corcoran zip-side jump boots, all the advantages of combat boots and they have a heavy-duty brass zip on the side making them fast and easy to get on and off. Those or Doc Martens. If you’re not Korean or Indian you’ll stick out no matter what boots you wear!

by Andrew Tonn | 16 Apr 2009 09:04 | Lund, Sweden | | Report spam→
Corcoran jump boots!!!

by [former member] | 16 Apr 2009 09:04 | moscow, Russia | | Report spam→
Ballerina toe shoes. Sometimes a quick pirouette can help to sidestep a situation and as long as you will stand out in Korea or India no matter what you wear…

by Barry Milyovsky | 16 Apr 2009 13:04 | lost in the, United States | | Report spam→
or you can always get a pair of good for nothings aka Flip Flops. You can’t run in them, you can’t walk long distance in them, you cannot actually do anything except flip-flop around in them but there cheap and no one in the 3rd world is going to pinch them…unless there a special Gucci edition!



by [former member] | 16 Apr 2009 13:04 | London, United Kingdom | | Report spam→
You know, Magnum boots are probably the only way the majority of us will ever get into Magnum

by Akaky | 16 Apr 2009 14:04 | New York , United States | | Report spam→
I wear ones with no holes in..

Honestly.. Is this really relevant to image making? Intelligence kinda dictates what to wear.. Am i missing the point here or can someone enlighten me to the point of this post. If you can persuade me that this post has real meaning then im just waiting for the first person to ask… Best toothpaste for Katmandu.. or maybe what nailclippers are you taking on your next Nat Geo assignment..

Honestly.. Is this really relevant to image making? Intelligence kinda dictates what to wear.. Am i missing the point here or can someone enlighten me to the point of this post. If you can persuade me that this post has real meaning then im just waiting for the first person to ask… Best toothpaste for Katmandu.. or maybe what nailclippers are you taking on your next Nat Geo assignment..“Would American combats stand out in a place like Korea or India? Any help is appreciated.” really cracks me up.. Actually your American accent and passport will get you into more trouble..

Honestly.. Is this really relevant to image making? Intelligence kinda dictates what to wear.. Am i missing the point here or can someone enlighten me to the point of this post. If you can persuade me that this post has real meaning then im just waiting for the first person to ask… Best toothpaste for Katmandu.. or maybe what nailclippers are you taking on your next Nat Geo assignment..“Would American combats stand out in a place like Korea or India? Any help is appreciated.” really cracks me up.. Actually your American accent and passport will get you into more trouble..Get a life!!

by Stewart Weir | 16 Apr 2009 15:04 | Belgrade, Serbia | | Report spam→
Stewart, could you repeat that several times in Hindi and Korean?

by Barry Milyovsky | 16 Apr 2009 15:04 | lost in the, United States | | Report spam→
Heres the Hindi..

मैं नहीं छेद अंदर से लोगों को पहन लो.
सच में .. यह सच में छवि बनाने के लिए प्रासंगिक है? खुफिया kinda क्या .. पहनने के लिए आदेश मैं यहाँ बात याद आ रही है या किसी को इस पद के मुद्दे पर मुझे बताए कर सकते हैं. यदि आपको लगता है कि इस पोस्ट बस पूछने वाले पहले व्यक्ति … Katmandu .. के लिए सर्वश्रेष्ठ टूथपेस्ट का इंतज़ार कर im तो असली मतलब है मुझे मनाने कर सकते हैं आप अपने अगले नेट भू काम .. पर ले जा रही है या हो सकता है क्या nailclippers हैं

सच में .. यह सच में छवि बनाने के लिए प्रासंगिक है? खुफिया kinda क्या .. पहनने के लिए आदेश मैं यहाँ बात याद आ रही है या किसी को इस पद के मुद्दे पर मुझे बताए कर सकते हैं. यदि आपको लगता है कि इस पोस्ट बस पूछने वाले पहले व्यक्ति … Katmandu .. के लिए सर्वश्रेष्ठ टूथपेस्ट का इंतज़ार कर im तो असली मतलब है मुझे मनाने कर सकते हैं आप अपने अगले नेट भू समनुदेशन .. "पर ले जा रही है या हो सकता है क्या nailclippers रहे हैं अमेरिकी combats कोरिया या भारत की तरह एक जगह में बाहर खड़ा करोगे? कोई भी मदद की सराहना की है. "वास्तव में दरारें मुझे .. असल में अपने अमेरिकी लहजे और पासपोर्ट और मुसीबत .. में मिल जाएगा

सच में .. यह सच में छवि बनाने के लिए प्रासंगिक है? खुफिया kinda क्या .. पहनने के लिए आदेश मैं यहाँ बात याद आ रही है या किसी को इस पद के मुद्दे पर मुझे बताए कर सकते हैं. यदि आपको लगता है कि इस पोस्ट बस पूछने वाले पहले व्यक्ति … Katmandu .. के लिए सर्वश्रेष्ठ टूथपेस्ट का इंतज़ार कर im तो असली मतलब है मुझे मनाने कर सकते हैं आप अपने अगले नेट भू समनुदेशन .. "पर ले जा रही है या हो सकता है क्या nailclippers रहे हैं अमेरिकी combats कोरिया या भारत की तरह एक जगह में बाहर खड़ा करोगे? कोई भी मदद की सराहना की है. "वास्तव में दरारें मुझे .. असल में अपने अमेरिकी लहजे और पासपोर्ट और मुसीबत में तुम्हें मिल जाएगा .. एक जीवन जाओ!!

Not sure about the Korean.. need a few more days..

by Stewart Weir | 16 Apr 2009 16:04 | Belgrade, Serbia | | Report spam→
My Hindi is getting better-I managed to pick out the words kinda, Katmandu, combats, and nailclippers. I’ll be speaking the language like a native in no time at all at this rate.

by Akaky | 16 Apr 2009 20:04 | New York , United States | | Report spam→
which leather stripe for my new white M 8.2?

by [former member] | 16 Apr 2009 21:04 | Ibiza, Spain | | Report spam→

I don’t go for Bush bashers myself,
got Ecos and love them!

by Yoav Galai | 16 Apr 2009 23:04 | London, United Kingdom | | Report spam→
Another vote for Blundstones. They’re comfortable, last forever and reasonably priced.

jack

by Jack Kurtz | 17 Apr 2009 02:04 | Phoenix, Arizona, United States | | Report spam→
This thread still going?!

Still Blundstones I say.

by Paul KISS | 17 Apr 2009 08:04 | Melbourne, Australia | | Report spam→
Slightly off subject but which kind of shoes are best for throwing at people?

by Barry Milyovsky | 17 Apr 2009 14:04 | lost in the, United States | | Report spam→
I wear industrial work shoes that look like grey/black joggers, but they have a steel sole plate and toe cap for protection. And they are cheap…get them at KMart or WalMart.

by Stephen Asprey | 20 Apr 2009 07:04 | Sydney, Australia | | Report spam→
Depends on the job. Rosa Klebb boots are the best for covering protests.
Rosa_Klebb's_deadly_weapon

by JR, (John Watts-Robertson). | 20 Apr 2009 08:04 | rothwell, United Kingdom | | Report spam→
I always wear Keen Hiking boots, or their Hiking sandals, they are comfortable, and durable, and are easy to clean because most of their products are waterproof.

by Matt Hensley | 20 Apr 2009 10:04 | Cape Town, South Africa | | Report spam→
I came across a pair of $30 boots in Peru while I was traveling…The brand is called “Power”, and they are made in Peru. Possibly the best pair of hiking boots I have ever owned. I cannot recommend them enough…going to buy 3 pairs next time I’m working down south…

by Dan Figueroa | 20 Jan 2010 07:01 | san jose, United States | | Report spam→
Vasque Sundowners have been the gold standard for hiking boots for decades. I’ve tried maybe 5 different brands since throwing out my Sundowners, and none of them compare.

by Tommy Huynh | 20 Jan 2010 11:01 | San Antonio, United States | | Report spam→
GO AWAY!

by [former member] | 20 Jan 2010 11:01 | Washington, DC, United States | | Report spam→
Neal, are GO AWAY available in different widths?

by Barry Milyovsky | 20 Jan 2010 12:01 | lost in the, United States | | Report spam→
Best shoes ever, bought at an Oakley shop at a PX somewhere in Iraq:
http://www.oakley.com/catalog/products/sabot-high

by Jake Warga | 23 Jan 2010 17:01 | Los Angeles, United States | | Report spam→
For medium duty in HOT climate’s the Vasque Breeze GTX 7466 has served me very well, has even prevented a couple sprained ankles in rough mountain terrain with a 50 lb load:
http://www.vasque.com/vasque-shoe/7466-vasque/7466-vasque-mens-breeze-gtx-taupe-burnt-orange

For more heavy duty use where the terrain is always bad, a older version of the Merrel Perimeter has lasted me 10+ years: http://www.merrell.com/US/en-us/ViewProduct.mvc.aspx/15109M/0/Mens/Perimeter-Gore-Tex?galleryId=M-F

by Bill Thomas | 23 Jan 2010 18:01 | NYC, United States | | Report spam→
Aaaargh!!
Most durable footwear in the world…..
http://www.ehow.com/how_4495148_make-pair-ho-chi-minh.html

Perfect for the modern eco-conscious photographer on a tight budget.
Next week on Lightstalkers… How to make a Leica M9 from old tin cans and used coke bottles and also
‘which is the best scarf?’

by JR, (John Watts-Robertson). | 23 Jan 2010 19:01 | rothwell, United Kingdom | | Report spam→
.. whatever brand, it seems to be a 100% male thing ;)

by eva mbk | 23 Jan 2010 19:01 | Tuscany, Italy | | Report spam→
Which brand of handbag?

by JR, (John Watts-Robertson). | 23 Jan 2010 19:01 | rothwell, United Kingdom | | Report spam→
doesn’t matter, as long as it is black with a red dot ;)

by eva mbk | 23 Jan 2010 19:01 | Tuscany, Italy | | Report spam→
If u use boots try: Blundstone 500 or U.S military desert boots

or if you use snickers try: Solomon XT

by Ilia Yefimovich | 23 Jan 2010 20:01 | Tel-Aviv, Israel | | Report spam→
.. whatever brand, it seems to be a 100% male thing ;)

Eva, are you saying that women should be barefoot and pregnant all the time?

by Barry Milyovsky | 23 Jan 2010 20:01 | lost in the, United States | | Report spam→
Barry, I think you mean barefoot and pregnant in the kitchen ;)

by AP | 23 Jan 2010 22:01 | Perth, Australia | | Report spam→
Andee, “in the kitchen,” sounds a bit sexist, don’t you think?

by Barry Milyovsky | 23 Jan 2010 22:01 | lost in the, United States | | Report spam→
oh i can’t wait for the next episode, which is the best scarf!!

by julia s. ferdinand | 24 Jan 2010 00:01 | chiang mai, Thailand | | Report spam→
Julia,
That would be an Hermés scarf…
;-)

by J-F Vergel | 24 Jan 2010 08:01 (ed. Jan 24 2010) | New York, NY, USA, United States | | Report spam→
… to go with an Hermés Leica.
http://gizmodo.com/5406164/leica-m7-hermes-edition-your-bank-account-cant-handle-this-gorgeousness

by J-F Vergel | 24 Jan 2010 08:01 | New York, NY, USA, United States | | Report spam→
hmmm.. means i’ve got to change handbag now? sheeesh..

by eva mbk | 24 Jan 2010 09:01 | Tuscany, Italy | | Report spam→
i can’t afford an Hermés scarf.. wah! and there’s no waaaaay i can afford that leica..
besides i have a mui mui handbag.. think i’d better go italian with the accessories.

by julia s. ferdinand | 24 Jan 2010 12:01 | chiang mai, Thailand | | Report spam→
Go to http://www.sierratradingpost.com/ which is a great site for stuff like that. Lugged soles, gore-tex to stay comfortable, and something that isn’t bright red or yellow, so you don’t look like a doofus. Remember stiff soled hiking boots are great for walking over rough ground carrying a load, but difficult to run in.

by David Buzzard | 24 Jan 2010 16:01 | Whistler, Canada | | Report spam→
If you have narrow feet, try Danners. They lace closer to the toe than most, and are the best I’ve tried for a narrow foot. Some versions are a bit clunky looking, but if you’re going to be carrying 40 pounds of hardware around in places with no sidewalks or roads, who cares what your boots look like? I figure, if your feet hurt, you won’t be concentrating on what you’re doing, and if you’re irritable, you won’t come across well to the people you’re trying to talk to. I worry more about bunions than about the symbolic implications of my footwear.

by John Louis Lassen Perry | 24 Jan 2010 18:01 | San Francisco, California, United States | | Report spam→
Having spent 7 years in the military and worn a variety of boots for ‘work’ purposes, the most important thing is comfort! What works for one person may not work for someone else. I still wear issue boots, strong, sturdy, able to run, fairly waterproof, acceptable in civilian life etc etc…. but whatever works for you! And yes, socks are very important as well- no point wearing thin socks that wear out. I was issued thick socks when we first got to Iraq/ Afghanistan and didn’t wear them until my civilian socks wore out as I thought they’d be too hot. Not at all; they were awesome.

Anyone who’s interested, Drake’s (British tie makers) are about to come out with a scarf/ hat that is based on a British World War 1 design. It’s a scarf that you can fold in on itself to use as a hat. Useful and warm!

by Andy Barnham | 24 Jan 2010 18:01 | London, United Kingdom | | Report spam→
I’m with Julia. In Southeast Asia, where you take off your shoes to go into people’s homes, temples etc it’s slip ons. Laces are a PITA. I’m firmly in the Blundstone camp. Best shoes I’ve ever owned.

by Jack Kurtz | 24 Jan 2010 18:01 | Phoenix, Arizona, United States | | Report spam→
How did this dumbass topic come back up?

by Akaky | 24 Jan 2010 19:01 | New York , United States | | Report spam→
You are all foot fetishers!!!!!!!!!

Otherwise how can one explain this bleeping post failing to die?

by [former member] | 24 Jan 2010 19:01 | Washington, DC, United States | | Report spam→
OK Neal, a call for foot photos:

Oda a los pies 01

by Barry Milyovsky | 24 Jan 2010 22:01 (ed. Jan 24 2010) | lost in the, United States | | Report spam→
Barry, just trying to be a little sexist… ahh, if only my wife could find the kitchen ha

by AP | 25 Jan 2010 12:01 | Perth, Australia | | Report spam→
Ow yeah and we all are older and wiser.

Especially older as I was photographing sitting on my knees…as I do a lot. And it hurts like hell! I am wrecking a jeans every 4-5 months.

Are there any hip knee protectors out there?

I know, it sounds funny but I am actually considering buying something like that.

by Tom Van Cakenberghe | 02 Mar 2013 19:03 (ed. Mar 2 2013) | Kathmandu, Nepal | | Report spam→
Tom, it doesn’t sound funny at all. My usual breakfast is coffee and Aleve, for my knees. In any typical shooting day I am on my knees 3/4 of the time. And my jeans last < 1 year. I use kneepads for carpenters, and they fit under my Carhartts. Problem is they slide down my legs when I sweat, and I haven’;t figured out how to fix this yet.

by John Rudoff | 02 Mar 2013 20:03 | Portland Oregon, United States | | Report spam→
Tom, it doesn’t sound funny at all. My usual breakfast is coffee and Aleve, for my knees. In any typical shooting day I am on my knees 3/4 of the time. And my jeans last < 1 year. I use kneepads for carpenters, and they fit under my Carhartts. Problem is they slide down my legs when I sweat, and I haven’;t figured out how to fix this yet.

by John Rudoff | 02 Mar 2013 20:03 | Portland Oregon, United States | | Report spam→
Tom, have you tried yak fleece?

by Barry Milyovsky | 02 Mar 2013 21:03 | New York, United States | | Report spam→
Whoa, dude. Boy does this thread bring back memories. Anyhow, I know a few archaeology tricks I’ve heard. One is to get some of those hard knee pads rollerbladers use. They usually slip over clothes using a wide elastic band. This looks dorky and is inconvenient, so you can cut the elastic band and have somebody stitch some velcro closures to them so that they can be put over clothes without taking your boots off. Another method is a little more custom, take a pair of fairly baggy work pants like Carhartts, for example, and have a tailor stitch a pocket into the inside of the knee, then cut a piece of dense, closed cell foam to fit the pocket. The pants just sort of look stiff at the knees, but protect the knees much better than jeans or pants alone. Above all, make sure your shoes fit right and have shock absorbent insoles. Overly hard shoes can wreck the knees faster than you would think. Hope that’s useful.

by John Louis Lassen Perry | 02 Mar 2013 23:03 | Liberty Corner, New Jersey, United States | | Report spam→
Hi Barry, no I haven’t tried it yet. Is it any good? Better then these?

Actually I am not so concerned with my jeans having holes in them, they had holes already when I bought them.

Hi John, yes I have loads of that padding here – these thin foamy trekkers mattresses. Good idea, I am not using these anyway.

by Tom Van Cakenberghe | 03 Mar 2013 06:03 | Kathmandu, Nepal | | Report spam→
Wow, those look Uber-Dorky, haha! Nice colors. But yeah, that blue bedroll stuff trekkers use, that is perfect to experiment with.

by John Louis Lassen Perry | 03 Mar 2013 13:03 | Liberty Corner, New Jersey, United States | | Report spam→
Tom, I can’t find yak fleece here. I can’t even find the yak butter for the Tibetan tea recipe you gave me two years ago.

by Barry Milyovsky | 03 Mar 2013 14:03 | New York, United States | | Report spam→
Barry! Are you still looking for yak butter? Why don’t you start a new tread here on LS?

I can send some with the mail if you want, that stuff is so rancid it can only become better over time.

by Tom Van Cakenberghe | 03 Mar 2013 16:03 | Kathmandu, Nepal | | Report spam→
Wow – great to see this thread up and running again – suddenly it’s 2008 again. Try these Rail Rider pants if you want something heavy duty with double thick knees. Pants are terrific. I gave my 15 yo son a pair and HE thinks they’re terrific, too. I have no ideas on yak butter, however.

by John Robert Fulton Jr. | 03 Mar 2013 18:03 | Spring Lake, Michigan, United States | | Report spam→
Thanks for the offer Tom, but ever since people here began mailing envelopes containing anthrax to their elected political representatives a few years ago the US Postal Service has become rather cautious. I think a package containing rancid yak butter might cause alarm. I would hate for you to become the victim of an unmanned drone strike.

by Barry Milyovsky | 04 Mar 2013 03:03 (ed. Mar 4 2013) | New York, United States | | Report spam→
I love this thread! Tom I’m glad you resurrected it.

BTW, you used to be able to buy tactical pants from 5.11 that had two layers of fabric over the knees so that you could slip a pad into it. When you are a cop kneeing some perp in the groin, you don’t want to hurt your knees. They looked pretty much like regular cargo pants. Best of all they have an elastic waist which allows for, ahem, adjustment around pot bellies. I don’t know if they still have that feature buy you can check it out here:

http://www.511tactical.com/All-Products/Pants.html

by Neal Jackson | 05 Mar 2013 02:03 | Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam | | Report spam→

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Participants

Tim Hodge, Semi-Student/Full Photog Tim Hodge
Semi-Student/Full Photog
Conway, Sc , United States
Max Pasion, Street Photographer Max Pasion
Street Photographer
Bayonne, Nj , United States ( EWR )
Imants, gecko hunter Imants
gecko hunter
" The Boneyard" , Australia
Petr Antonov, photographer//oil trash Petr Antonov
photographer//oil trash
(photographer // oilfield trash)
Moscow , Russia
John Robinson, Photographer John Robinson
Photographer
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Martin Mraz, Photographer & Translator Martin Mraz
Photographer & Translator
Prague , Czech Republic ( PRG )
JR, (John Watts-Robertson)., Photographer JR, (John Watts-Robertson).
Photographer
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Software Architect
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Paris , France
James Colburn, Photographer/Photo Editor James Colburn
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Joel Sackett, photographer Joel Sackett
photographer
Puget Sound, Washington , United States ( AAA )
Steve Orcutt, Marine /  Aspiring Photoj Steve Orcutt
Marine / Aspiring Photoj
All Over , Italy
Daniel Legendre, Photographer Daniel Legendre
Photographer
Paris , France
Paul KISS, Paul KISS
Melbourne , Australia
Buck Pago, UNEMPLOYED Buck Pago
UNEMPLOYED
[undisclosed location].
J-F Vergel, photographer J-F Vergel
photographer
New York, Ny , United States ( JFK )
Tyler Cacek, Nursing Student Tyler Cacek
Nursing Student
Missouri , United States
sbramin, flaneur sbramin
flaneur
London , United Kingdom ( LHR )
Frederic Harster, Frederic Harster
[undisclosed location].
BignoseTW, Videographer/Photographer BignoseTW
Videographer/Photographer
(Tobie Openshaw)
Taipei , Taiwan
Finn, un callejon sin salida Finn
un callejon sin salida
Hudson Valley , United States
Nick Morris, Photojournalist/Photograp Nick Morris
Photojournalist/Photograp
(The Image Group Photography)
San Diego Ca , United States
Phil Sussman, Photojournalist Phil Sussman
Photojournalist
Tampa, Fl , United States
julia s. ferdinand, photographer julia s. ferdinand
photographer
Chiang Mai , Thailand ( CNX )
DPC, Photographer DPC
Photographer
Paris , France
Alberto Rey, Freelance Photographer Alberto Rey
Freelance Photographer
(Alberto Rey)
Bursa , Turkey
david sutherland, travel photographer david sutherland
travel photographer
London , United Kingdom
Tom Leininger, i take pictures Tom Leininger
i take pictures
Denton, Tx , United States
Stephen Asprey, Photojournalist Stephen Asprey
Photojournalist
(Visual Journalism)
Sydney , Australia
Barry Milyovsky, totally unprofessional Barry Milyovsky
totally unprofessional
(emperor of ice cream )
New York , United States
John Carolan, Photographer John Carolan
Photographer
Shetland , United Kingdom
Jerome Favre, Photojournalist Jerome Favre
Photojournalist
Hong Kong , Hong Kong
Paul Nelson, Travel/Freelance Photogra Paul Nelson
Travel/Freelance Photogra
(Photographer)
Toronto, Ontario , Canada ( YYZ )
Heimana, Moment catcher Heimana
Moment catcher
(Freelance Photographer)
Leh Ladakh , India ( IXL )
Marcus Adams, Photographer & Guide Marcus Adams
Photographer & Guide
(Guide, Photographer & Fixer)
Singapore , Singapore
Ted Engelmann, Photographer/Writer Ted Engelmann
Photographer/Writer
Baghdad , Iraq
Andrew Tonn, Documentary Journalist Andrew Tonn
Documentary Journalist
(Photography/Writing/Documentar)
Lund , Sweden
Akaky, Contemptible lout Akaky
Contemptible lout
New York , United States ( AAA )
Stewart Weir, Photographer Stewart Weir
Photographer
Bangkok , Thailand
Yoav Galai, Photographer Yoav Galai
Photographer
London , United Kingdom
Jack Kurtz, Photojournalist Jack Kurtz
Photojournalist
Bangkok , Thailand
Matt Hensley, Photojournalist Matt Hensley
Photojournalist
(photojournalist)
Auckland , New Zealand ( AKL )
Dan Figueroa, Photographer Dan Figueroa
Photographer
(DanFigPhoto)
Based Out Of Ensenadad , Mexico
Tommy Huynh, Travel & Corporate Photog Tommy Huynh
Travel & Corporate Photog
Houston , United States
Jake Warga, Freelancer Jake Warga
Freelancer
(Radio/Photo)
Seattle , United States
Bill Thomas, Photographer-Videographer Bill Thomas
Photographer-Videographer
Nyc , United States
eva mbk, cabby eva mbk
cabby
Tuscany , Italy ( SAY )
Ilia Yefimovich, Photographer Ilia Yefimovich
Photographer
Tel Aviv , Israel
AP, AP
Busan , Korea (South) ( PUS )
David Buzzard, Photographer David Buzzard
Photographer
Whistler , Canada ( YVR )
John Louis Lassen Perry, Photoanthropologist John Louis Lassen Perry
Photoanthropologist
Jersey City , United States
Andy Barnham,  Freelance photographer Andy Barnham
Freelance photographer
(carpe D.M.- grab your boots)
London , United Kingdom
Tom Van Cakenberghe, Tom Van Cakenberghe
Kathmandu , Nepal
John  Rudoff, Still Photography John Rudoff
Still Photography
(Photographer)
Portland Oregon , United States
John Robert Fulton Jr., Photographs John Robert Fulton Jr.
Photographs
Spring Lake, Michigan , United States
Neal Jackson, Neal Jackson
(Flaneur, Savant and Scapegrace)
Washington, Dc , United States ( IAD )


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