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RED HOOK custom B+W lab services

Being that I have an under-utilized darkroom, I want to start offering some custom black+white services…

1) Film developing + contact sheets at reasonable rates.
2) Darkroom rental so you can DIY, both developing and printing. Three enlargers to print up to 4×5 neg. and 16×20 fiber prints, with archival washer.
3) B+W training…either for beginners or refresher course. You watch, and then you try it the second time. Also tricks for printing, testing of developers, etc.

The idea is to provide and share skills from a photographer to other photographers, a friendly, personal way to get your work done, rather than dealing with some big lab that ruins your film.

We’re located in friendly Red Hook, Brooklyn, so give us a call or send us an email!

RedHookLab@gmail.com
(917) 309-8866

Thanks,

Alan

by [a former member] at 2008-12-17 14:54:21 UTC Brooklyn , United States | Bookmark | | Report spam→

Great idea Alan, but where is Red Hook?

by [former member] | 17 Dec 2008 15:12 | | Report spam→
the last time i checked, Andy, you were born in Brooklyn. so you should know where Red Hook is…right here in Brooklyn!

by [former member] | 17 Dec 2008 15:12 | Brooklyn, United States | | Report spam→
highly recommended!

by [former member] | 17 Dec 2008 15:12 | New York, United States | | Report spam→
I was born in Manhattan, the parents were from the Bronx, but its a great idea, and if you drop of film at Alan’s you can go to Ikea and Fairway which are all close by…..also there is a nearby bar that is very famous.

by [former member] | 17 Dec 2008 15:12 | | Report spam→
I’ve seen this darkroom (when I visited Christian last May) and I give two thumbs up.
Alan Chin is a highly-skilled badass, you should hire him.

by P. Money | 17 Dec 2008 15:12 | | Report spam→
Red Hook, Brooklyn

by Tomoko Yamamoto | 17 Dec 2008 16:12 | Baltimore, MD, United States | | Report spam→
I haven’t seen this darkroom but I spent some time with Alan and I can only recommend this. You can learn about photography from this guy even when just drinking with him… I can only imagine how much you can learn actually working alongside him in the darkroom (that is if you don’t prefer that he does the work while you go to Ikea).

by [former member] | 17 Dec 2008 16:12 | Montreal, Canada | | Report spam→
Another shameless plug for the workshop http://www.mardigras360degrees.org Of course Alan is king and we are going to encourage people to shoot film, preferably tri-x.

by [former member] | 17 Dec 2008 16:12 | | Report spam→
People, listen… Were talking about a man who has processed film, out of a toilet, in the middle of a war zone… Alan is more than qualified to handle you film! Do It!

by [former member] | 17 Dec 2008 17:12 | Washington, DC, United States | | Report spam→
Talk about your negatives looking like shit—

by [former member] | 17 Dec 2008 17:12 | | Report spam→
I help him build a part of it. So at least I know that the plumbing is good:) Jiro

by [former member] | 17 Dec 2008 17:12 | Beirut, Lebanon | | Report spam→
Anyone have advice on ways I could process B+W/make contact sheets while in South East Asia? Going to be traveling all around but will base myself out of Bangkok, trying to find a darkroom to rent space out there. Although processing out of a toilet sounds awesome I’m not sure that I have the expertise to do so! -Bobby

by Robert Sukrachand | 17 Dec 2008 18:12 | New York City, United States | | Report spam→
Here’s the tried and true “on-the-road developing kit” — now i don’t actually develop film out of the toilet when I’m traveling, I sit on it (closed) while agitating the film over the bathtub!

1) laptop computer as normal + portable harddrives, DVD/CDs, etc.
2) 35mm Nikon scanner
3) 100 sheets plastic negative sleeves (or glassine envelopes)
4) loupe

5) 2 4 reel stainless steel developing tanks with 8 reels total
6) 8 clothespins, piece of string to hang the film from.
7) thermonmeter
8) small graduate/measuring cup
9) changing bag
10) swiss army knife (to pop open the rolls of film, also scissors on it)

11) 1 16 oz. bottle HC-110 developer and/or 1 pack XTOL powder to make 5 liters
12) 1 liter Rapid Fixer (enough to make 4 liters of working solution)
13) 1 small bottle PermaWash (3 oz. per gallon, this goes a long way)
14) 1 small bottle Photo-Flo

locally, you should get liter and 2 liter empty bottles for the working solutions. blowdryer, a small lightbox, canned dust-off air, anti-static cloth, negative cleaning solution, are all useful additional tools.

Everything except the chemicals fits in a bag the size of a six-pack. Very portable.


Thanks for all the good karma!

I want to add that yes, I am right across the street from Ikea and down the block from Fairway. But also I am offering pickup/delivery of your film within New York City as one of the potential services…the idea here is to make this work on an individual basis for people. Within reason, I’m open to photographers’ needs and excited to try new developers or techniques that people like.

The dust on the digital vs. film battle has settled. K+M can’t keep any of its ASA 400 black+white film in stock, whether it be Kodak or Ilford. But the days when your neighborhood drugstore sent you back snapshots printed on fiber-paper, or you could get huge discounts at the big labs, that’s over. It’s a much smaller, niche market for film-based photography, so it’s imperative that we keep the knowledge and practice alive…

by [former member] | 17 Dec 2008 22:12 (ed. Dec 17 2008) | Brooklyn, United States | | Report spam→
Can I get some Red Hook ale while in Red Hook, Brooklyn?

And can you get my T-Max 400 from Penn Station if I send it up on the train?

by [former member] | 18 Dec 2008 01:12 | Washington, DC, United States | | Report spam→
Alan, You dog…. But do you provide a bed to sleep…

by Christopher Morris | 18 Dec 2008 03:12 | Tampa, Florida, United States | | Report spam→
Thanks for the info Alan. I have most of the things you recommended, except most notably the scanner. But I was thinking I should be able to find a flatbed somewhere in BKK just to make some digital contact sheets for preview until I return to NY. I look forward to processing on the road! One other question – should there be any concerns about water quality anywhere in Asia for development? Thanks! -Bobby

by Robert Sukrachand | 18 Dec 2008 05:12 | New York City, United States | | Report spam→
Hi,

I notice that you take a penknife to pop open the film cannister. I’ve always struggled to do this. I use one of those plastic thingamajigs that allows you to get the film out of the cannister once it’s wound in. In the light, I get the lead out, and cut it off square, so I’ve got my exposed cannister with a squared off end of film coming out. In the dark I load off that end, loading and winding the film out of the cannister at the same time.

When I reach the end of the film, I cut it off square, leaving the cannister unopened, and ready to be reloaded with new film for reuse.

It works like a dream for me, and means that I’ve always got a surfeit of good cannisters to use for rolling my own.

All the best Alan – would love to come visit if I’m ever in NY again.
Craig

PS: Robert, I’ve sometimes used a mini-light-table, and a small digital camera with macro mode for ‘scanning’ negatives. The quality is terrible – even with 6×6 – but it’s enough to get an idea of what the image will look like.

by Craig Mason-Jones | 18 Dec 2008 06:12 (ed. Dec 18 2008) | Cape Town, South Africa | | Report spam→
Hi Robert, I would rent my darkroom out to you, only I live it in!!
Here’s an idea for you to consider, you can buy these light tight bags to get your film out of the canisters, and then roll them onto the reels from ‘within’…..they have elasticated wrist bands, and although tricky, they do work!! All of this can be done anywhere, of course, hotel room, where-ever, then as you know, the rest is done in the light. I know of one place in Bangkok that used to sell them, not sure if they do anymore – but perhaps you should by one in the States before you arrive – easier to find n’est-ce-pas??
The water here is fine….although I’ve had some problems with reticulation once or twice…that’s cuz the water was 30 plus degrees (hot season), and coming from a 20 degree bath, I guess it was just too much of a shock for the film emulsion to handle. The water’s clean though (ish)….hope this helps

by Olivier Pin-Fat | 18 Dec 2008 07:12 | | Report spam→
Typo…‘buy’, not by

by Olivier Pin-Fat | 18 Dec 2008 07:12 | | Report spam→
:-))…2nd TYPO…‘I live in it’…not ‘I live it in’…although ‘living it in’ sounds quite interesting

by Olivier Pin-Fat | 18 Dec 2008 07:12 | | Report spam→
One last thing Robert, you can buy your chemistry here…saves you having to carry it…(D-76…or Tetanol liquid….the choice is yours)…send me an email if you need to know addresses etc…good luck!!

by Olivier Pin-Fat | 18 Dec 2008 07:12 | | Report spam→
Awesome thank you Craig + Olivier for the tips.

I’m bringing a few bags of XTOL with me but it’s great to know I can get developer in BKK just in case! Olivier, is it also easy to get fixer, hypoclear, etc.? Thanks again. -Bobby

by Robert Sukrachand | 19 Dec 2008 05:12 | New York City, United States | | Report spam→
Yes, Robert, you can. Dev, stop, fixer, hypo agent, it’s all here. (Tri-X too)…I get my chemistry from here:

Pro Colour Lab
35 Soi Rachadaniwet
Pracharatbamphen Road
Huay Kwang
Bangkok 10320

Call them for taxi directions

Tel: 02 691 3649
02 691 3650

Enjoy Bangkok!!

by Olivier Pin-Fat | 20 Dec 2008 04:12 | | Report spam→
I’ve used Alan’s darkroom before, it’s one of the better ones I’ve ever been in, best custom-built one that’s for sure. There’s a very “homey” atmosphere to it.

If you need custom b&w work or training take advantage of the offer, you won’t regret it.

by Christopher Guess | 20 Dec 2008 18:12 | Madison, Wisconsin, United States | | Report spam→
UPDATE:

Due to the economy, BIG SPRING DISCOUNTS at the Red Hook Lab! Prices you can’t beat, and they won’t last….

Pricing:

1) Film Developing is $5 per roll (was $10), with contact sheet, $10. (was $15) Normal chemistry used is HC-110 or X-TOL, but you can request other, such as D-76 or anything else.

Price is same for 35mm or 120 film. We are not currently set up for sheet film. No extra charge for pushing/pulling.

MORE Discounts available for high volume.

2) Darkroom rental: $50 per day, (was $80) price includes chemistry but not paper. Discounts available if you book more than one day.

3) Training: $120 for 4 hours instruction + rest of the day by yourself in the darkroom. (was $150)

Currently we are NOT offering printing services other than contact sheets, but may do so in the future.

We can also arrange to pick up and drop off your film within NYC.

Thank you,

Alan Chin
Red Hook Lab
46 Beard Street
Brooklyn, NY 11231
(917) 309-8866

by [former member] | 22 Apr 2009 15:04 | Brooklyn, United States | | Report spam→
Wow this sounds great Alan, I’ll definitely give you a call next time I’m back in NY.

by Menashe Wodinsky | 22 Apr 2009 17:04 | Jerusalem, Israel | | Report spam→
He’s also got a damn comfortable futon and can make a killer stir fry out of last weeks leftovers.

by [former member] | 22 Apr 2009 18:04 | Washington DC, United States | | Report spam→
Alan, I might be dropping some film off. Even shipping from DC its still cheaper than local developing.

by Bill Putnam | 22 Apr 2009 23:04 | Washington, DC, United States | | Report spam→
I’ll send you my first rolls of 620 from the marche au puce Lumiere!

by [former member] | 23 Apr 2009 02:04 | Washington, DC, United States | | Report spam→
Alan, I need my contact sheets printed as van dyke browns, what is the charge and turn around for this?

by [former member] | 23 Apr 2009 03:04 | | Report spam→
alan also provides other services besides film: he handrolls a lovely cigarette.

by Erin Siegal McIntyre | 23 Apr 2009 16:04 | New York, New York, United States | | Report spam→

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Participants

P. Money, Creative & Futurist P. Money
Creative & Futurist
(See That Which Cannot Be Seen)
[undisclosed location].
Tomoko Yamamoto, Multimedia Artist Tomoko Yamamoto
Multimedia Artist
Vienna , Austria ( VIE )
Robert Sukrachand, Photographer Robert Sukrachand
Photographer
New York City , United States
Christopher Morris, Christopher Morris
Tampa, Florida , United States
Craig Mason-Jones, IT / Photographer Craig Mason-Jones
IT / Photographer
Cape Town , South Africa
Olivier Pin-Fat, Olivier Pin-Fat
(.)
[undisclosed location].
Christopher Guess, Documentary Photojournali Christopher Guess
Documentary Photojournali
Brooklyn , United States ( LGA )
Menashe Wodinsky, Freelance Menashe Wodinsky
Freelance
(Be your own hero)
New York , United States ( JFK )
Bill Putnam, Producer. Bill Putnam
Producer.
(Video-Photo)
Washington, D.C. , United States
Erin Siegal McIntyre, Photographer & Writer Erin Siegal McIntyre
Photographer & Writer
Tijuana , Mexico


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