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The Essential Field Guide to Afghanistan - Newsletter n°2 October 2011

> From: Edward Girardet <info@essentialfieldguides.com>
> Date: October 22, 2011 12:25:19 PM GMT+04:30
> To: destinataires inconnus:;
> Subject: The Essential Field Guide to Afghanistan – Newsletter n°2 October 2011
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> CROSSLINES Essential Media Ltd.
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> The Essential Field Guides
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> The Essential Field Guides to humanitarian and conflict zones (EFGs) are a series of handbooks for journalists, aid workers, soldiers, diplomats, academics, entrepreneurs or general interest readers seeking to grasp the context, understand a country or situation and operate safely in dangerous and what are often constantly changing environments. For an archive of past EFG newsletters, plus further information on the handbooks, please visit our website at www.essentialfieldguides.com
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> NEWSLETTER Nr 2 (October, 2011)
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> INSIDE THIS EDITION
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> The EFG to Afghanistan : Sponsor copies of the EFG for free distribution to Afghans
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> Essential Readings: the EFG editors’ selection of latest publications on Afghanistan
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> Editors’ corner
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> Follow us online
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> Support the EFG or advertise
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> The EFG to Afghanistan: sponsor copies in English and Dari for free distribution among Afghans
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> Ever since the first Essential Field Guide to Afghanistan (EFG) was published in English in 1998 – the so-called ‘Taliban edition’ – numerous Afghans have asked that it be made available in Dari. Up till now, only those with English have been able to read it. Some complained – justifiably – that the international community was only concerned about informing themselves, not Afghans. Now in its 4th fully revised edition, the EFG will finally come out both in English and Dari (Persian). And we want to make it available free to as many Afghans as possible, particularly during the current transition period.
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> Afghans need to know more about the complexities of recovery and peacekeeping in their homeland. We wish to ensure that every Afghan, whether aid professional, teacher, health worker, civil servant, police, military, student, entrepreneur, journalist or civil society representative, has a chance to read the EFG as an independent and credible information resource. For this to happen, we need the support of the international community. We ask that government donors, members of ISAF, foundations, concerned individuals and others sponsor bulk copies. We would also be happy to highlight the identity of sponsors as part of the distribution.
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> For further information, please contact the editors at: info@essentialfieldguides.com
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> Essential Readings
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> The EFG Editors have selected six must-read books on Afghanistan:
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> The Afghan Solution: the Inside Story of Abdul Haq, the CIA and how Western Hubris lost Afghanistan (published summer, 2011)
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> By Lucy Morgan Edwards
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> Extract of "When the Lion Roared: How Abdul Haq Almost Saved Afghanistan”, Michael Hughes for the Huffington Post.
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> “According to Lucy Morgan Edwards in her new book, the U.S. chose to force regime change from without while marginalizing Haq, who still valiantly tried to activate his plan on October 26, 2001 but was assassinated by the Taliban (although local sources claim his executioners were tipped off by certain foreign intelligence agencies). A decade later, it has become quite clear why Haq’s solution was — and still is — the only solution.” Read the entire review
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> Killing the Cranes: A Reporter’s Journey through Three Decades of War in Afghanistan (published September, 2011)
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> By Edward Girardet
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> Extract of Edward Girardet’s Nervous Breakdown self-interview:
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> Your book often reads like a novel or an adventure mixed with lots of personal insight. Some people have said that it’s exhausting to read because they’re traveling with you. It’s still written in the tradition of American journalism, but you obviously write from your own point of view. You consider yourself part of the Afghan story. How do you deal with this?
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> “One of my editor friends kept telling me that Killing the Cranes had to be the definitive book about Afghanistan. But I told him that there is nothing definitive about Afghanistan. All that you can do is paint a picture with broad sweeps coupled with detailed observation about certain incidents. He also complained that I wrote so much about trekking. But I did this deliberately. Almost all my reporting was done by foot across the Hindu Kush and deserts. This meant walking 14-16 hours a day. You slept in villages, bombed houses, under rocky overhangs, out in the open and so on. But you were always walking and you kept meeting people, such as fighters, refugees or farmers. You were in constant touch with local people. »
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> Buzkashi: Game and Power in Afghanistan (Revised edition)
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> By Whitney Azoy
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> Azoy writes about Buzkashi: Game and Power in Afghanistan: “This book is meant to further the [learning] process, to use a seemingly innocent folk game as a lens whereby we can understand the deep structure of a culture and a country.”
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> Much has happened since Buzkashi first appeared; the past three decades have devastated Afghanistan. Replete with significant updates, including a new chapter profiling Afghanistan’s past and recent struggles, this richly illustrated Third Edition remains the first and only full-scale anthropological examination of a single sport, buzkashi, as well as a beautifully written longitudinal case study about the game s social significance. Praise for the third edition
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> Ghosts of Afghanistan: the Haunted Battleground (published September, 2011)
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> By Jonathan Steele
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> “The notion of American exceptionalism is as old as the writings of Alexis de Tocqueville, the first analyst to describe the United States’ significant differences from European states. […] The U.S. experience runs against that of the rest of the world, where it is generally acknowledged that a war may end more quickly and at less cost through political compromise and agreement. The belligerents on all sides realize that victory is impossible, the war is essentially a stalemate and the demands for which they took up arms are not going to be achieved in full.”
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> Continue reading Chapter 12: Talking to the Taliban – How the war ends on the Truth-out.org
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> An Enemy We Created: The Myth of the Taliban / Al-Qaeda Merger in Afghanistan, 1970-2010 (to be published November, 2011)
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> By Alex Strick Van Linschoten and Felix Kuehn
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> “There is an urgent need to re-examine the known facts of the Taliban-al-Qaeda relationship and to tell the story of the Taliban’s encounter with internationalist militant Islamism. [An enemy we created] responds to the overheated rhetoric that sustains a one-sided interpretation of the alleged merger between the two groups as well as the policy implications for Afghanistan that flowed in the wake of its acceptance by Western governments and their militaries. The relationship between the two groups and the individuals who established them is undeniably complex, and has remained so for many years. Links between the Taliban and al-Qaeda were retained in the face of a shared enemy following the invasion of Afghanistan after the September 11 attacks, an adversary that was selected by al-Qaeda rather than by the Taliban, and which led the latter to become entangled in a war that was not of its choosing.” www.anenemywecreated.com
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> Captive: My Time as a Prisoner of the Taliban (published June, 2010)
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> By Jere Van Dyk
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> A reminder of Jere Van Dyk’s gripping account of his experience inside the Taliban strongholds in February 2008. Jere Van Dyk was recently interviewed on RT (October 4):
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> [About the summer attacks in Kabul] “Insurgents want to show very clearly that they can penetrate the so called ‘American ring of steel’ around Kabul and that there is no place in Afghanistan where they cannot go”.
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> [Comparing the Soviet war and the operation Enduring Freedom] “What the Allies have not done this far, although they are trying, is to create something of grandeur, a dam or a major factory, something to show that they have really maintained a successful environment that would intimidate the Taliban, like the Russians did”.
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> Editors’ corner
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> Edward Girardet has been recently traveling to the US and UK to promote “Killing the Cranes”. Girardet participated with Lucy Morgan Edwards, Horia Mosadiq and Dawood Azami to a Frontline Club event in London on October 5 discussing where war has left the people of Afghanistan. Watch it here
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> Follow us
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> Follow us on Twitter EssentialFieldG and Join our Facebook Fan page. > > Read the Essential Afghanistan Daily on Paper.Li, based on a broad variety of online information sources (media, military, humanitarian...) that do not necessarily represent the views of the publishers but provide a daily overview of Afghanistan, the conflict and the people. > > > Support the EFG or advertise > > - Become a support member > > - Sponsor the EFG or advertise on our website > > - Pre-order the 4th edition of The Essential Field Guide to Afghanistan online via PayPal or order the electronic version of the 3rd edition. (For bulk orders - 100 copies or more - please contact infoessentialfieldguides.com)

by teru kuwayama at 2011-10-22 15:34:19 UTC | Bookmark | | Report spam→


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